Author Topic: Analysing the one-leg jump, part VII: The tendons  (Read 1343 times)

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seifullaah73

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Re: Analysing the one-leg jump, part VII: The tendons
« Reply #1 on: June 19, 2014, 06:52:19 am »
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Its here the article I have been waiting for. The least talked about topic its all been about muscle strength development leaving tendons the hidden topic that plays a major role.  :highfive:

Now, I'm going to read it.

Edit 1. my calf when stretched is about just a little less than half way down. So I guess I have long achilies tendon, would that be good for sprinter as appose to one leg jumping ankle dorsiflexion and knee bend is important in the sprint.

Edit2 so for sprinting the achilies would have to be stiff due dorsiflexion to apply force to ground, which is short, but sprinters have long achilies tendons, as ball calfs,  is it difficult to make long tendons stiff?

The hip flexor tendon is a mysterious one, you require compliancy to extend knee with hip and stiffness to produce force by extending hip by bringing leg back wards which is straight to drive body forward and paw back so is the stiffness and compliancy like steps ups combined with bss for hip extension and mobility.

What workout helps with compliancy band workout, bss. I have heard most workouts to increase stiffness but not much for compliancy.




« Last Edit: June 19, 2014, 07:49:10 am by seifullaah73 »
Measuring reminder:
5 toe to heel steps = 148cm
------------------------------------------------------------------------

�Strength comes from the legs, Power comes from the torso and Speed comes from the arm.� � Al Vermeil

My Progress Log
A Journey to Running fast and Jumping High

Raptor

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Re: Analysing the one-leg jump, part VII: The tendons
« Reply #2 on: June 19, 2014, 07:06:57 am »
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You bet! Hopefully it will make sense.

seifullaah73

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Re: Analysing the one-leg jump, part VII: The tendons
« Reply #3 on: June 19, 2014, 07:50:51 am »
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Any way to determine if you are tendon dominant but muscularly weak like me
Measuring reminder:
5 toe to heel steps = 148cm
------------------------------------------------------------------------

�Strength comes from the legs, Power comes from the torso and Speed comes from the arm.� � Al Vermeil

My Progress Log
A Journey to Running fast and Jumping High

Raptor

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Re: Analysing the one-leg jump, part VII: The tendons
« Reply #4 on: June 19, 2014, 07:52:03 am »
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Tendon dominant = reactive and quick, but not necessarily explosive.
Muscle bound = sluggish and slow, but not necessarily non-explosive.

Raptor

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Re: Analysing the one-leg jump, part VII: The tendons
« Reply #5 on: June 19, 2014, 07:56:32 am »
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To increase compliancy, the load has to be light. When you do a dynamic warm-up, or dynamic stretching, you don't put out a lot of force or load on that joint, so the load is light and it goes on a long ROM => increases that tendon's compliance.

So you want compliant hip flexor tendons (dynamic warm-up, leg swings, stuff like that), stiff quad tendons (1/4 and 1/2 squats, high intensity 2-leg bounds, consecutive hurdle jumps - this is the area where I'm personally the weakest, and an area where you can FINALLY find a good reason to do half squats and quarter squats) and stiff Achilles tendons (heavy calf raises, intense calf-oriented plyos (one leg bounds, depth jumps)).

If you break it down like this, then you can have a good idea of how to program a plyo workout to get all these three better.

seifullaah73

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Re: Analysing the one-leg jump, part VII: The tendons
« Reply #6 on: June 19, 2014, 12:09:42 pm »
+1
Interesting, now i know to train muscle and tendons as hip muscle strength through squats hyperextension for strength and hip tendon compliancy through light load such light bands or leg swings dynamic warm up plyos etc.

I have learnt a lot, excellent article
Thanks
Measuring reminder:
5 toe to heel steps = 148cm
------------------------------------------------------------------------

�Strength comes from the legs, Power comes from the torso and Speed comes from the arm.� � Al Vermeil

My Progress Log
A Journey to Running fast and Jumping High