Author Topic: Articles on effectiveness of plyometrics?  (Read 1379 times)

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Dreyth

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Articles on effectiveness of plyometrics?
« on: April 23, 2015, 11:12:41 am »
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Any articles showing clear benefits of them? Like real scientific stuff. I already play basketball 1-3 times a week, so im not talking about movement efficiency and side hops and stuff. I mean depth drops and depth jumps.

I just can't help but think increasing squat:bw ratio, being coordinated, and practicing max effort jumps is enough. That it's simply not worth doing depth jumps and burning out your CNS when that energy could be used to increase my squat:bw ratio instead.

Just *how effective* are depth jumps in *actually* increasing your ROFD? Is it THAT much more effective than lifting a load at maximum effort? Remember, ROFD can be increased by even lifting 80% loads, as long as its with 100% effort...

FWIW, my vertical has 100% of the time correlated with my squat:bw ratio provided I had decent movement efficiency. Maybe once I get to a 2.5xbw squat that will change and I'll have to do plyometrics?
« Last Edit: April 23, 2015, 11:19:16 am by Dreyth »
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LBSS

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Re: Articles on effectiveness of plyometrics?
« Reply #1 on: April 23, 2015, 11:59:48 am »
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Quick search on PubMed doesn't actually turn up that much.

Effects of in-season short-term plyometric training program on sprint and jump performance of young male track athletes. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25647644

Acute potentiating effect of depth jumps on sprint performance. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23799423

This abstract seems to indicate that power and stretching training increase depth jump height and also ground contact time during depth jumps, i.e., those things are correlated. Interesting. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11880813
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Dreyth

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Re: Articles on effectiveness of plyometrics?
« Reply #2 on: April 23, 2015, 04:04:27 pm »
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Interesting stuff. I know that for potentiation purposes, depth jumps can work very well. Actually, 40yd sprints can work well too. in order to do my first dunk i did 4x40yd sprints the day before testing it and nothing else.

Plyos are probably something i wont worry about until (A) i start seeing diminished returns from increasing my squat:bw ratio or (B) increasing my squat:bw is so difficult after a certain point, that i would better spend my time focusing on plyos
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LBSS

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Re: Articles on effectiveness of plyometrics?
« Reply #3 on: April 23, 2015, 04:47:35 pm »
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^^^makes sense.
Muscles are nonsensical they have nothing to do with this bullshit.

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Raptor

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Re: Articles on effectiveness of plyometrics?
« Reply #4 on: April 24, 2015, 06:21:57 pm »
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Completely agree. I think one thing that is not discussed enough is the overload that is occuring during plyos, that can't otherwise be replicated in the gym.

So in terms of CNS training to accept that overload in terms of not shutting down the muscles and also accepting that tension in the associated tendons (the tendons themselves have to adapt etc) - that is underrated with plyos.

For example, right now I can dunk on 2.95 off a standing vertical jump, but off even one step I jump lower. I just can't "cope" with the overload, as little as it is, that is occuring. Maybe it's the body position that is different (legs not under me) or whatever, but I feel the collapse occuring.