Author Topic: Changes in exercises are more effective than loading schemes to improve muscle  (Read 2033 times)

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Raptor

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seifullaah73

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Interesting, I have heard this from a lot of people also, try to change up the exercise over weekly periods or two. as you also mentioned having cycle of chin ups pull ups dips.

it also makes the exercise interesting instead of doing same thing over and over again. so it stimulates cns as well i guess.
----------------------------------------------------------------
Note for self:
A
>>    Jump Squats
>>    Half Squats
>>    Partials at the bottom: 3-5 x 15 (very controlled)
>>    Calf Raises
>>    RDL
>>
>> B
>>    Jump Squats
>>    Half Squats
>>    Squat singles x 10, reset between reps, just working on hitting
>> depth comfortably with moderate loads
>>    Calf Raises
>>    RDL
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Measuring reminder:
5 toe to heel steps = 148cm
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Dreyth

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Never thought this would be better, but I have my reasoning for it. At least for me, if I don't perform an exercise for a while then I lose neural strength in it. So I feel like keeping the neural strength in an exercise would be better than changing it up because you could be doing more weight due to your efficiency in that exercise!
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vincevega

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Never thought this would be better, but I have my reasoning for it. At least for me, if I don't perform an exercise for a while then I lose neural strength in it. So I feel like keeping the neural strength in an exercise would be better than changing it up because you could be doing more weight due to your efficiency in that exercise!

I agree with this. If i skip and exercise for a while. No matter how good my workouts have been and how similar other exercises ive been performing are i dont see progress in the skipped exercise or even lose ground.

Raptor

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Well I took a two week COMPLETE break from any gym work whatsoever, and I came back and squatted 140 kg with ease (while before that I was struggling mildly). You could argue that the recovery I got during those two weeks was better for my squat than any loss of efficiency that might've happened during that time span.

Dreyth

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Well I took a two week COMPLETE break from any gym work whatsoever, and I came back and squatted 140 kg with ease (while before that I was struggling mildly). You could argue that the recovery I got during those two weeks was better for my squat than any loss of efficiency that might've happened during that time span.

I could definitely argue that, and I could also argue that you could have squatted MORE than 140kg if you were working up to 90% singles 2-3 days a week during that time :)

fwiw i took 6 weeks off and bench went from 230x5 to 185x6 :(
obviously 6 weeks is too much haha. but in my personal experience, and i have logged this many times, if i take so much as a single week off from lifting, my lifts drop temporarily.
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