Author Topic: Petey Basketball Training  (Read 4893 times)

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D-Rose Jr

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Petey Basketball Training
« on: March 27, 2011, 10:10:54 pm »
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So I wanted to get in detail with my basketball training and anything else basketball related like games, etc. and only use the other log for the progress tracker (helps a lot)
I was hoping you could make a subforum for basketball training.

D-Rose Jr

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Re: Petey Basketball Training
« Reply #1 on: March 27, 2011, 10:14:46 pm »
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http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ja4L-DJgFLg
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YFsUaLY1aME
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xYhGGQy8c_E
Any tips on my crossover. i am trying to make it look like Iverson's crossover
I was bored at home no ride to the gym.
« Last Edit: March 27, 2011, 10:59:00 pm by Petey0109 »

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Re: Petey Basketball Training
« Reply #2 on: March 28, 2011, 09:14:56 am »
+1
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ja4L-DJgFLg
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YFsUaLY1aME
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xYhGGQy8c_E
Any tips on my crossover. i am trying to make it look like Iverson's crossover
I was bored at home no ride to the gym.

Obviously, since you even mentioned it, it's tough to work on a certain basketball skill without a gym. So no problem there, at least you're doing something.

However, I wouldn't do it in the kitchen for multiple reasons, I would go out to the street/parkinglot/driveway.

Here's my tips on your crossover than I would tell the kids I coach:
1. Do. Not. Emulate. The crossover is a tough move that relies on quickness, ball control and timing. If you're trying to emulate somebody elses crossover, you're throwing in a whole new set of parameters that could be holding back your body-type's potential. Iverson had long arms, low-center of gravity, lightning-quick moves, and didn't weigh hardly anything. All these things attributed to his crossover. Trying to emulate his crossover on looks is one thing; trying to emulate its -effectiveness- is a whole nother ambition and it's the one I would aim for.

2. This one is tough if you have to practice in the kitchen a lot. But don't worry about going side-to-side on your crossover. A good form crossover is actually side-to-backwards-step, then go. I'll try to explain this one as best as I can but it's tough without a visualization. Imagine, you have a defender right in front of you. Step 1, attack to your right (his left) to make him step back with his left foot. Step 2, cross over from your right hand to your left while stepping back slightly (a few inches) with your left foot. This causes an exact opposite change of direction that you are controlling in your defender, he -has- to react. He's giving you too much space if he doesn't. Step 3, time your next move with the defenders close-out. As he steps up to you after you stepped back, then you blow by him with your left as he's stepping towards you leaving him in the dust and you with a clear path to the basket/etc. (Side note: My best move is by using the double crossover, instead of blowing by him with my left when he steps up, cross it back over to your right hand and go that direction. It requires slightly better skill on the crossover, but it's a stronger move for most people as they are right handed most of the time and it will be me attacking with my dominate hand.) If any of that wasn't clear, just ask.

3. Now, the move above was described for a 1-on-1 type, halfcourt offensive move. You also have in-transition crossovers that you do not step backwards on. These are your more consistently -highlight reel- type crossovers. You have to remember the speed that the top-level elite players are moving at. Even from a standstill, it's practically transition speeds once they start moving. With this crossover, the main thing to remember is move your shoulders with the ball around your defender (Example: When crossing from left to right at full speed, drop your left shoulder with the ball when you cross over to your right, and get your left shoulder past your defender. Then you're by them.).

4. Don't focus on the crossover as a way to embarrass your defender. If you're out to embarrass somebody you're not looking for your teammates, you're not making the correct play and you're 9x out of 10 taking your team out of their offensive sets. Iverson was the king of the crossover, but he wasn't the consummate teammate. He dominated the ball and his teammates suffered for it. Sure he got points, won a few games and got some awards. But no rings. His gameplay was unique and amazing to watch, but other than 1 above-average year, he didn't win much of anything. It's a bad mindset.

The crossover is a great skill to have in your bag of tricks, but it should be one of many. Dribble hard and strong, work on manipulating the ball and your defender to the parts of the court where you're more successful and capable of helping your team more often and you'll go a long way.

Hope that helps. Let me know if you have any questions on other subjects. I tend to write novels in my replies but I try to be informative. Good luck!
My real name is Daniel. (6'5" - 217lbs.)

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dirksilver

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Re: Petey Basketball Training
« Reply #3 on: March 28, 2011, 02:05:27 pm »
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i just liked your PJ's

your handles are about 100000000000 times as good as mine

D-Rose Jr

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Re: Petey Basketball Training
« Reply #4 on: March 28, 2011, 05:00:54 pm »
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Nah bruh. I practice around the neighborhood, the garage, the gym, driveway, etc. I was just watching tv and that's what I do when I am bored. My parents have gotten used to it after 2 years.

D-Rose Jr

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Re: Petey Basketball Training
« Reply #5 on: March 28, 2011, 05:32:11 pm »
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http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ja4L-DJgFLg
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YFsUaLY1aME
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xYhGGQy8c_E
Any tips on my crossover. i am trying to make it look like Iverson's crossover
I was bored at home no ride to the gym.

Obviously, since you even mentioned it, it's tough to work on a certain basketball skill without a gym. So no problem there, at least you're doing something.

However, I wouldn't do it in the kitchen for multiple reasons, I would go out to the street/parkinglot/driveway.

Here's my tips on your crossover than I would tell the kids I coach:
1. Do. Not. Emulate. The crossover is a tough move that relies on quickness, ball control and timing. If you're trying to emulate somebody elses crossover, you're throwing in a whole new set of parameters that could be holding back your body-type's potential. Iverson had long arms, low-center of gravity, lightning-quick moves, and didn't weigh hardly anything. All these things attributed to his crossover. Trying to emulate his crossover on looks is one thing; trying to emulate its -effectiveness- is a whole nother ambition and it's the one I would aim for.

2. This one is tough if you have to practice in the kitchen a lot. But don't worry about going side-to-side on your crossover. A good form crossover is actually side-to-backwards-step, then go. I'll try to explain this one as best as I can but it's tough without a visualization. Imagine, you have a defender right in front of you. Step 1, attack to your right (his left) to make him step back with his left foot. Step 2, cross over from your right hand to your left while stepping back slightly (a few inches) with your left foot. This causes an exact opposite change of direction that you are controlling in your defender, he -has- to react. He's giving you too much space if he doesn't. Step 3, time your next move with the defenders close-out. As he steps up to you after you stepped back, then you blow by him with your left as he's stepping towards you leaving him in the dust and you with a clear path to the basket/etc. (Side note: My best move is by using the double crossover, instead of blowing by him with my left when he steps up, cross it back over to your right hand and go that direction. It requires slightly better skill on the crossover, but it's a stronger move for most people as they are right handed most of the time and it will be me attacking with my dominate hand.) If any of that wasn't clear, just ask.

3. Now, the move above was described for a 1-on-1 type, halfcourt offensive move. You also have in-transition crossovers that you do not step backwards on. These are your more consistently -highlight reel- type crossovers. You have to remember the speed that the top-level elite players are moving at. Even from a standstill, it's practically transition speeds once they start moving. With this crossover, the main thing to remember is move your shoulders with the ball around your defender (Example: When crossing from left to right at full speed, drop your left shoulder with the ball when you cross over to your right, and get your left shoulder past your defender. Then you're by them.).

4. Don't focus on the crossover as a way to embarrass your defender. If you're out to embarrass somebody you're not looking for your teammates, you're not making the correct play and you're 9x out of 10 taking your team out of their offensive sets. Iverson was the king of the crossover, but he wasn't the consummate teammate. He dominated the ball and his teammates suffered for it. Sure he got points, won a few games and got some awards. But no rings. His gameplay was unique and amazing to watch, but other than 1 above-average year, he didn't win much of anything. It's a bad mindset.

The crossover is a great skill to have in your bag of tricks, but it should be one of many. Dribble hard and strong, work on manipulating the ball and your defender to the parts of the court where you're more successful and capable of helping your team more often and you'll go a long way.

Hope that helps. Let me know if you have any questions on other subjects. I tend to write novels in my replies but I try to be informative. Good luck!

1. I am quick, and have ball control. I probably need to work on my timing. I thought Iverson would be one to emulate because his cross was so darn effective.
2. I have other places to practice but I dribble around when I am bored and watching TV. Do you have a youtube video or can you make one PLEASE?
3. My transition game is NASTY. i usually have more time to react and can change speeds, cross, etc. fairly easily. My half court is WACK though.
4. I just wanted one go to perimeter move not to emberass anyone. I am more of a pass first kinda guy. actually a little to pass quick.


Thanks this was informative, but I will probably have to read it several more times to fully understand it.

I was wondering what would be a great go to perimeter move in the half court.

D-Rose Jr

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Re: Petey Basketball Training
« Reply #6 on: March 28, 2011, 05:33:37 pm »
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My go to moves right now are my floater, pull back to a jumper, three pointer, midrange pullup, and spin move in the paint

aiir

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Re: Petey Basketball Training
« Reply #7 on: March 28, 2011, 06:42:03 pm »
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http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ja4L-DJgFLg
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YFsUaLY1aME
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xYhGGQy8c_E
Any tips on my crossover. i am trying to make it look like Iverson's crossover
I was bored at home no ride to the gym.

Obviously, since you even mentioned it, it's tough to work on a certain basketball skill without a gym. So no problem there, at least you're doing something.

However, I wouldn't do it in the kitchen for multiple reasons, I would go out to the street/parkinglot/driveway.

Here's my tips on your crossover than I would tell the kids I coach:
1. Do. Not. Emulate. The crossover is a tough move that relies on quickness, ball control and timing. If you're trying to emulate somebody elses crossover, you're throwing in a whole new set of parameters that could be holding back your body-type's potential. Iverson had long arms, low-center of gravity, lightning-quick moves, and didn't weigh hardly anything. All these things attributed to his crossover. Trying to emulate his crossover on looks is one thing; trying to emulate its -effectiveness- is a whole nother ambition and it's the one I would aim for.

2. This one is tough if you have to practice in the kitchen a lot. But don't worry about going side-to-side on your crossover. A good form crossover is actually side-to-backwards-step, then go. I'll try to explain this one as best as I can but it's tough without a visualization. Imagine, you have a defender right in front of you. Step 1, attack to your right (his left) to make him step back with his left foot. Step 2, cross over from your right hand to your left while stepping back slightly (a few inches) with your left foot. This causes an exact opposite change of direction that you are controlling in your defender, he -has- to react. He's giving you too much space if he doesn't. Step 3, time your next move with the defenders close-out. As he steps up to you after you stepped back, then you blow by him with your left as he's stepping towards you leaving him in the dust and you with a clear path to the basket/etc. (Side note: My best move is by using the double crossover, instead of blowing by him with my left when he steps up, cross it back over to your right hand and go that direction. It requires slightly better skill on the crossover, but it's a stronger move for most people as they are right handed most of the time and it will be me attacking with my dominate hand.) If any of that wasn't clear, just ask.

3. Now, the move above was described for a 1-on-1 type, halfcourt offensive move. You also have in-transition crossovers that you do not step backwards on. These are your more consistently -highlight reel- type crossovers. You have to remember the speed that the top-level elite players are moving at. Even from a standstill, it's practically transition speeds once they start moving. With this crossover, the main thing to remember is move your shoulders with the ball around your defender (Example: When crossing from left to right at full speed, drop your left shoulder with the ball when you cross over to your right, and get your left shoulder past your defender. Then you're by them.).

4. Don't focus on the crossover as a way to embarrass your defender. If you're out to embarrass somebody you're not looking for your teammates, you're not making the correct play and you're 9x out of 10 taking your team out of their offensive sets. Iverson was the king of the crossover, but he wasn't the consummate teammate. He dominated the ball and his teammates suffered for it. Sure he got points, won a few games and got some awards. But no rings. His gameplay was unique and amazing to watch, but other than 1 above-average year, he didn't win much of anything. It's a bad mindset.

The crossover is a great skill to have in your bag of tricks, but it should be one of many. Dribble hard and strong, work on manipulating the ball and your defender to the parts of the court where you're more successful and capable of helping your team more often and you'll go a long way.

Hope that helps. Let me know if you have any questions on other subjects. I tend to write novels in my replies but I try to be informative. Good luck!

great post, very useful
Log

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D-Rose Jr

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Re: Petey Basketball Training
« Reply #8 on: March 28, 2011, 10:26:46 pm »
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03.28.11

Planned on playing 3 on 3. Shit happened. Did some stationary work. Then tested out some moves. I did some floaters off 2 feet, some 3's, pullups, crosses to floaters.

Ok so after seeing things. My basketball training should GENERALLY look like this:

1. Dynamic Warmup
2. Effective ball handling
3. Driving, footwork, moves
4. Prolific Shooting drills
5. Finishing Drills

I need do Prolific Shooting drills, effective ball handling, work on my moves, driving drills and other better basketbal stuff.

JelloPuddinPup

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Re: Petey Basketball Training
« Reply #9 on: March 28, 2011, 10:28:49 pm »
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1. I am quick, and have ball control. I probably need to work on my timing. I thought Iverson would be one to emulate because his cross was so darn effective.
2. I have other places to practice but I dribble around when I am bored and watching TV. Do you have a youtube video or can you make one PLEASE?
3. My transition game is NASTY. i usually have more time to react and can change speeds, cross, etc. fairly easily. My half court is WACK though.
4. I just wanted one go to perimeter move not to emberass anyone. I am more of a pass first kinda guy. actually a little to pass quick.


Thanks this was informative, but I will probably have to read it several more times to fully understand it.

I was wondering what would be a great go to perimeter move in the half court.

I'll see if I can make a video, but with my shoulder messed up right now I haven't gone to the gym lately. I'll see what I can do. It definitely makes more sense when you can see it in action step by step with each move overemphasized.

As for a go-to move. I've never found a move more easily executed and effective as a simple jab-step or cross step. Basically, it's a shot fake to the side, only instead of faking a shot, you're faking the direction of your drive. It's by far the most effective move if you're reading the direction the defender is closing out, or rotating to you on. You just fake the direction he is already going to keep his momentum up and then drive opposite. Simple and easy. Manu Ginobili is king of mastering this skill. He's slow by NBA standards, but his ability to use this move to get to the basket is amazing! I'm not the quickest guy, but it has a similar effect for me. It allows me to play on a defenders quickness and use it to my advantage. If someone as quick as you masters it then it can be deadly.
My real name is Daniel. (6'5" - 217lbs.)

Website: http://www.nbachat.co (Coming Soon) [40/100% Complete]
Blog: http://www.callyourownfouls.com (Coming Soon) [65/100% Complete]
YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/jellopuddinpup

Jard

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Re: Petey Basketball Training
« Reply #10 on: March 29, 2011, 02:54:44 am »
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http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ja4L-DJgFLg
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YFsUaLY1aME
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xYhGGQy8c_E
Any tips on my crossover. i am trying to make it look like Iverson's crossover
I was bored at home no ride to the gym.

Obviously, since you even mentioned it, it's tough to work on a certain basketball skill without a gym. So no problem there, at least you're doing something.

However, I wouldn't do it in the kitchen for multiple reasons, I would go out to the street/parkinglot/driveway.

Here's my tips on your crossover than I would tell the kids I coach:
1. Do. Not. Emulate. The crossover is a tough move that relies on quickness, ball control and timing. If you're trying to emulate somebody elses crossover, you're throwing in a whole new set of parameters that could be holding back your body-type's potential. Iverson had long arms, low-center of gravity, lightning-quick moves, and didn't weigh hardly anything. All these things attributed to his crossover. Trying to emulate his crossover on looks is one thing; trying to emulate its -effectiveness- is a whole nother ambition and it's the one I would aim for.

2. This one is tough if you have to practice in the kitchen a lot. But don't worry about going side-to-side on your crossover. A good form crossover is actually side-to-backwards-step, then go. I'll try to explain this one as best as I can but it's tough without a visualization. Imagine, you have a defender right in front of you. Step 1, attack to your right (his left) to make him step back with his left foot. Step 2, cross over from your right hand to your left while stepping back slightly (a few inches) with your left foot. This causes an exact opposite change of direction that you are controlling in your defender, he -has- to react. He's giving you too much space if he doesn't. Step 3, time your next move with the defenders close-out. As he steps up to you after you stepped back, then you blow by him with your left as he's stepping towards you leaving him in the dust and you with a clear path to the basket/etc. (Side note: My best move is by using the double crossover, instead of blowing by him with my left when he steps up, cross it back over to your right hand and go that direction. It requires slightly better skill on the crossover, but it's a stronger move for most people as they are right handed most of the time and it will be me attacking with my dominate hand.) If any of that wasn't clear, just ask.

3. Now, the move above was described for a 1-on-1 type, halfcourt offensive move. You also have in-transition crossovers that you do not step backwards on. These are your more consistently -highlight reel- type crossovers. You have to remember the speed that the top-level elite players are moving at. Even from a standstill, it's practically transition speeds once they start moving. With this crossover, the main thing to remember is move your shoulders with the ball around your defender (Example: When crossing from left to right at full speed, drop your left shoulder with the ball when you cross over to your right, and get your left shoulder past your defender. Then you're by them.).

4. Don't focus on the crossover as a way to embarrass your defender. If you're out to embarrass somebody you're not looking for your teammates, you're not making the correct play and you're 9x out of 10 taking your team out of their offensive sets. Iverson was the king of the crossover, but he wasn't the consummate teammate. He dominated the ball and his teammates suffered for it. Sure he got points, won a few games and got some awards. But no rings. His gameplay was unique and amazing to watch, but other than 1 above-average year, he didn't win much of anything. It's a bad mindset.

The crossover is a great skill to have in your bag of tricks, but it should be one of many. Dribble hard and strong, work on manipulating the ball and your defender to the parts of the court where you're more successful and capable of helping your team more often and you'll go a long way.

Hope that helps. Let me know if you have any questions on other subjects. I tend to write novels in my replies but I try to be informative. Good luck!

Amazing post, agree w. pretty much everything on here.
You should make a thread in here and start basketball-blogging every once in a while man, seen nothing but good info coming from you.
Thanks

D-Rose Jr

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Re: Petey Basketball Training
« Reply #11 on: March 29, 2011, 02:47:00 pm »
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seriously you should have your own blog or thread

D-Rose Jr

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Re: Petey Basketball Training
« Reply #12 on: March 29, 2011, 08:59:22 pm »
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I went to the park today.

I shot around a little and then I:
played 1 game of 21 with three other players
played 3 games of 2 on 2
played 1 game of 4 on 4

Ok I was driving a lot and attacking during 21 and the first game of 1 on 1. I was finishing pretty well. For finishing I need to remember to look at the basket throughout the whole shot. I probably shouldn't have played the other games because I started settling for jumpers and wasn't hustling. 

I NEED to make my floater automatic.
I NEED to remember that no one remembers pickup games. Play without a conscious and test shit out.
I NEED to attack the basket and play defense.
I NEED to stop playing once I start get tired for recovery and to not develop bad habits.*

*Focus write now is skills and strength.

aiir

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Re: Petey Basketball Training
« Reply #13 on: March 30, 2011, 12:44:40 am »
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I NEED to remember that no one remembers pickup games. Play without a conscious and test shit out.

x2
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 Like you really work that hard, to stay the same."
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Re: Petey Basketball Training
« Reply #14 on: March 30, 2011, 09:08:25 am »
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Amazing post, agree w. pretty much everything on here.
You should make a thread in here and start basketball-blogging every once in a while man, seen nothing but good info coming from you.
Thanks

seriously you should have your own blog or thread

Thanks guys. I love this game and have a fair amount of experience at most levels of it. I don't get to coach enough do to work/school so this is one of my only outlets to fulfill that itch.

I actually have a domain/blog semi-ready to go that I was working on. I was going to combine both basketball training/teaching and my love for the NBA/somecollege ball. It's not really in working order yet but the domain is http://callyourownfouls.com. I would like to get it set up by summertime to a working website. I also am developing another one based off a chat system for the NBA called http://NBAChat.co. That one will feature chat rooms specific to each NBA team plus some general basketball rooms as well as blog-rolls/articles from some of the more popular basketball blogs.

I used to be -very- good at developing websites and made quite a bit of money off it them but that took too much time. If I can just develop these enough to be self-sufficient and a fun little hobby then that would really be a great release to take time off of my schedule for work/school.

Anyways, back on topic.

I went to the park today.

I shot around a little and then I:
played 1 game of 21 with three other players
played 3 games of 2 on 2
played 1 game of 4 on 4

Ok I was driving a lot and attacking during 21 and the first game of 1 on 1. I was finishing pretty well. For finishing I need to remember to look at the basket throughout the whole shot. I probably shouldn't have played the other games because I started settling for jumpers and wasn't hustling. 

I NEED to make my floater automatic.
I NEED to remember that no one remembers pickup games. Play without a conscious and test shit out.
I NEED to attack the basket and play defense.
I NEED to stop playing once I start get tired for recovery and to not develop bad habits.*

*Focus write now is skills and strength.

Good job with the right mentality for 21. 21 is a one-on-everybody game. It's the perfect time to work on attacking the basket and what I call half-court-transition. Obviously, 21 is a half-court game, but it's you-versus-everybody so it's almost as if every time you take the ball back you're trying to finish a 1-on-__ fast break. It's pefect to work on change of direction/speed and practice getting the ball to your favorite spots under pressure of multiple defenders.

Also, don't worry about settling for jumpers. Some days, getting to the basket will be tough. If you can transition your game to mid-range or short-shot-game w/ floaters and elbow jumpers or 10-foot baseline jumpers then you'll be ahead of the game. Take it from someone who has played too much basketball, if you have multiple facets of your game to offer, then you'll almost always have something to fall back on if your go-to skillset just isn't working that day. I'm 6'5" and have been blessed with some decent basketball skills through a bit of hard work. However, despite being that height I'm am naturally a guard, but there are days where my shot just isn't falling from outside. Now, my height allows me to also have developed a good post game to fall back on. And usually those 2 parts of my game are all I need. Sometimes though, both aren't working. That's when my ability to play at the high-post as well as the mid-range baseline have come in real handy. The perks that my height allowed me to develop a strong inside-outside game are great but not necessary. You can learn other parts of the game (post-up, mid-range, perimeter) without natural inclinations such as height/speed/etc. One of the best post players I know is 5'9". He just knows his body and how to get space where space doesn't seem available. Basically all I am saying is be multi-faceted. Don't focus on one thing all the time. Don't be single-minded/limited on the court. That's what ballhogs, dumb players, and people that don't care do.

One note about floaters though: They're a great tool to have at the higher levels of basketball (aau, college, etc). If you can develop one that's great. But I would not focus on the floater before I mastered/learned the jump-stop and short-pull-up shot. The problem with younger players focusing on the floater is that it is a shot that is generally taken while your momentum is still carrying you towards the basket. If that is your only shot that you are capable of making when you get to higher-levels, you're going to commit a -lot- of charges. I don't know if you've ever run the 3on2-2on1 drill in a basketball practice. But basically it's a drill where you have 2 defenders on one end, and you attack with 3 players (1 in the middle w/ ball, 2 on outside.) The point is to cause the defense to commit to the ball and make a jump-stop and pass to the open player because once you're picked up, there is only 1 defender for 2 players. If you can learn that in a half-court setting to stop your momentum and make the jump-shot or correct pass you will go -way- farther in your game that with the floater. Coaches notice these things. They see a player that makes the right move and will not draw silly fouls and end up sitting next to them on the bench. So sure, floaters are nice, but they're not going to get you through a try-out with a traveling team or help you make varsity in the end.

Last thing, on defense in pick-up games. This might be the toughest thing of all to focus on in pick-up. It's a relaxed setting overall and 90% of people don't take pick-up seriously. So it's obvious that you may lose focus during it. Here's what I tell my players to do if they play. I won't get mad at them if they are playing the passing lanes, or staying in perfect on-ball defensive stance during the entire pick-up game. But, what I will not accept, (and I watch my players play pick-up a lot when I can, and I will take them out of pick-up games if they don't do the following things). 1. Stay between their player and the basket. (It's the easiest thing to do and it promotes always being in position to guard your man.) 2. Attack for rebounds. (Just a regular box out or following the ball. My teams win off rebounds so this is important to me.) 3. Close-out correctly. (If they help-down into the post and the post man kicks the ball out to the perimeter, all I ask is that they close out quickly and low to the ground so as to contest outside shots but not let their man just blow by them towards the basket.) If my players will follow just those 3 rules I do not mind them not playing the ultimate defense in pick-up. Those 3 things allow them to be good defenders and they are the basics to teaching team-defense. (Of course, once they come to practice they have about 15 other defensive rules to follow that if they do not do they will be running suicides. I'm strict on defense.) I have to say though, many if not most of my players follow all my defensive rules even in pick-up. It's a good habit to get into. If your coach likes you to play a certain way, study that and play that way as often as possible.

Okay, that's all. :)

If you have any more question I'd be more than happy to help. As always, if you have any questions about what I've said or need some more clarifications, just let me know.
My real name is Daniel. (6'5" - 217lbs.)

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