Author Topic: Random Strength and Conditioning Posts/Articles/Info That I Like  (Read 10407 times)

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LanceSTS

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Re: Random Strength and Conditioning Posts/Articles/Info That I Like
« Reply #32 on: June 30, 2012, 12:55:56 am »
+2
Quote
Bosch and Klomp (2005) wrote that hams, calfs are more pennate muscles bi-articular more suited for reactive work and energy trnasfers (isometrical), while glutes and quads are more parallel and uniarticular suited for concentric explosive actions.
The more the 'elastic' jump, the more the contribution from hams and calfs.... the deeper the jump and slower, the greater the contribution of quads and glutes.


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LanceSTS

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Re: Random Strength and Conditioning Posts/Articles/Info That I Like
« Reply #34 on: September 10, 2012, 04:15:56 am »
0
Chris Thibaudeau wrote:
>
> The autoregulation concept which is closely linked the cybernetic
> periodization and which refers to the actual self-adjustment of the
> training load according to the daily capacity of the athlete. I first
> learned this concept from one of Dr. Siff's article in the Soviet
> Sports Review (1993) on APRE Training and from the work of Dr.
> Ladislav Pataki.
>
> The article by Dr. Siff and the book by Dr. Pataki detailed 2
> different method of adjusting your training load to your capacity for
> that day.
>
> Dr. Siff's method consisted of training using a fixed number of reps
> during a specific workout and increasing intensity until one hit the
> maximum load he could use for the prescribed number of reps.
>
> For example, if the prescribed number of reps was 6, one could have
> the following progression during his training session:
>
> Set no.0: Warm-up
> Set no.1: 6 reps with 50% of his 6RM
> Set no.2: 6 reps with 75% of his 6RM
> Set no.3: 6 reps with 100% of his 6RM*
>
> * If the third set is successful:
>
> Set no.4: 6 reps with an additional 5lbs**
>
> **If the fourth set is successful:
>
> Set no.5: 6 reps with an additional 5lbs
>
> And this goes on until one is unable to complete the prescribed 6
> reps ... the last load achieved then become the new 6RM which is used
> as the basis for the planification of the load to use for the next
> session.
>
> Dr. Pataki's method is slightly different. The load is constant (and
> must be challenging for the prescribed number of reps) throughout the
> training session and so is the number of reps per set and the rest
> between sets. The athlete do as much sets as he can until he cannot
> complete the number of reps prescribed.
>
> For example, if the prescribed number of reps was 6:
>
> Set no.0: warm-up
> Set no.1: 6 reps with 95% of 6RM (completed)
> Set no.2: 6 reps with 95% of 6RM (completed)
> Set no.3: 6 reps with 95% of 6RM (completed)
> Set no.4: 6 reps with 95% of 6RM (completed)
> Set no.5: 6 reps with 95% of 6RM (only 5 reps completed)
>
> If the athlete is able to sustain a lot of work the load must be
> increased in the next session or the rest between sets is decreased.
>
> To these 2 methods one could add the classic bulgarian wave loading
> method where you gradually work up to your maximum capacity for a
> given workout, reduce the load and do more sets, then go back up.
>
> Example:
>
> Set no.0: warm-up
> Set no.1: 3 reps with 60% of 1RM
> Set no.2: 3 reps with 70% of 1RM
> Set no.3: 3 reps with 80% of 1RM
> Set no.4: 2 reps with 90% of 1RM
> Set no.5: 1 rep with 95% of 1RM*
>
> * If successful:
>
> Set no.6: 1 rep with an additional 5-10kg*
>
> * If successful:
>
> Set no.7: 1 rep with an additional 5-10kg*
> Set no.8: 2 reps with 90% of 1RM
> Set no.9: 2 reps with 95% of 1RM
> Set no.10: 1 rep with daily max
>
> ***Of course this is not a real Bulgarian loading pattern, just an
> example.
>
> Still, one could add the 3-2-1 wave loading method of Canadian
> weightlifting coach Pierre Roy where one does sets in wave pattern
> ... each wave comprising 3 sets of increasing intensity. When one is
> able to complete a wave, he starts a new one with the same reps
> scheme but with increased loading.
>
> Example:
>
> Set no.0: warm-up
> Set no.1: 3 reps with 88% of 1RM
> Set no.2: 2 reps with 92% of 1RM
> Set no.3: 1 rep with 98% of 1RM
>
> If all 3 sets are successful:
>
> Set no.4: 3 reps with 90% of 1RM
> Set no.5: 2 reps with 94% of 1RM
> Set no.6: 1 rep with 100% of 1RM
>
> If all 3 sets are successful:
>
> Set no.7: 3 reps with 92% of 1RM
> Set no.8: 2 reps with 96% of 1RM
> Set no.9: 1 rep with 102% of 1RM
>
> If all 3 sets are successful:
>
> Set no.10: 3 reps with 94% of 1RM
> Set no.11: 2 reps with 98% of 1RM
> Set no.12: 1 rep with 104% of 1RM
>
> Regardless of what scheme you use, the thing I like with this type of
> training is that it"s highly adjustable to the ever-changing
> capacities of the athlete. Some days the athlete has not fully
> restored his glycogen or protein structures so he will not be able to
> do as much work ... having him stick to a set loading parameters in
> that case can be overkill and further delay the supercompensation
> process and vice-versa.
>
> IMHO, autoregulating training methods are much more adequate to
> develop high performance athletes than set-in-stone loading schemes
> (even one carefully planned taking all physiological aspects in
> consideration).
>
> References:
>
> Pataki, L., "Autoregulation of Training Load" in Zbornik VR UV CSZTV,
> Bratislava, 1983, pp 233-236.
>
> Pataki, L., Holden, L., "Winning Secrets" (sorry, I don't have the
> full ref. I borrowed the book from a friend).
>
> Siff MC & Verkhoshansky YV "Supertraining" 1999 Ch 6
>
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LanceSTS

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« Last Edit: September 10, 2012, 04:38:34 am by LanceSTS »
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