Author Topic: The proper English thread  (Read 5911 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

vag

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4979
  • Respect: +2669
    • View Profile
The proper English thread
« on: February 01, 2016, 01:04:05 pm »
+2
LBSS , enjoy  :P
woot

vag

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4979
  • Respect: +2669
    • View Profile
Re: The proper English thread
« Reply #1 on: February 01, 2016, 01:07:08 pm »
+2
So, what happens with the final 'n' before an acronym? Do we consider the sound of the first word or the first letter of the word?

Is it 'an RDL' ( an Er Di El ) or 'a RDL' ( a Romanian deadlift )?
woot

maxent

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2348
  • Respect: +1495
    • View Profile
Re: The proper English thread
« Reply #2 on: February 01, 2016, 01:08:40 pm »
+2
Training for sub 20 5K & 40" RVJ & 170kg BS @ 85kg bw. log entry template

LBSS

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 11301
  • plugging away...
  • Respect: +5813
    • View Profile
    • Email
Re: The proper English thread
« Reply #3 on: February 01, 2016, 01:15:11 pm »
+1
So, what happens with the final 'n' before an acronym? Do we consider the sound of the first word or the first letter of the word?

Is it 'an RDL' ( an Er Di El ) or 'a RDL' ( a Romanian deadlift )?

depends on the first consonant of the acronym. if the letter's name starts with a vowel, as in "R" ("ar), then it's "an." if the letter's name starts with a consonant, as in "C" ("cee), then it's "a."

so it's "an RDL."
Muscles are nonsensical they have nothing to do with this bullshit.

- Avishek

handstand + backflip + flag

LBSS

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 11301
  • plugging away...
  • Respect: +5813
    • View Profile
    • Email
Re: The proper English thread
« Reply #4 on: February 01, 2016, 01:23:30 pm »
+1
also i am a huge supporter of this thread.  :goodjobbro: :goodjobbro: :goodjobbro: :goodjobbro: :goodjobbro:
Muscles are nonsensical they have nothing to do with this bullshit.

- Avishek

handstand + backflip + flag

Raptor

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 14464
  • Respect: +2393
    • Yahoo Instant Messenger - raptorescu
    • View Profile
    • Email
Re: The proper English thread
« Reply #5 on: February 01, 2016, 02:06:37 pm »
0
Why does the verb "play" has the form "played" but "pay" has the form "paid"?

Dreyth

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2776
  • Respect: +821
    • View Profile
    • Email
Re: The proper English thread
« Reply #6 on: February 01, 2016, 02:22:06 pm »
0
So, what happens with the final 'n' before an acronym? Do we consider the sound of the first word or the first letter of the word?

Is it 'an RDL' ( an Er Di El ) or 'a RDL' ( a Romanian deadlift )?

It depends on how you read it out loud. If you read it as Romanian Deadlift, then it would be A. If you read it as Ar Dee Ell, then it would be AN.

Since acronyms are read out loud as acronyms, it should be AN in my opinion.
I'm LAKERS from The Vertical Summit

LBSS

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 11301
  • plugging away...
  • Respect: +5813
    • View Profile
    • Email
Re: The proper English thread
« Reply #7 on: February 01, 2016, 03:38:28 pm »
0
Why does the verb "play" has the form "played" but "pay" has the form "paid"?

Great question and I have no idea. Weirdly, "paid" is said like "played" but "said" is said like "head".

As an aside, "paid" vs. "payed" actually depends on the sense in which you're using "pay." There's the normal meaning of give someone money for something. There's also a more esoteric meaning about letting out rope that can be conjugated "payed."
Muscles are nonsensical they have nothing to do with this bullshit.

- Avishek

handstand + backflip + flag

seifullaah73

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3098
  • Respect: +1196
    • View Profile
    • Email
Re: The proper English thread
« Reply #8 on: February 01, 2016, 03:48:26 pm »
0
So, what happens with the final 'n' before an acronym? Do we consider the sound of the first word or the first letter of the word?

Is it 'an RDL' ( an Er Di El ) or 'a RDL' ( a Romanian deadlift )?

depends on the first consonant of the acronym. if the letter's name starts with a vowel, as in "R" ("ar), then it's "an." if the letter's name starts with a consonant, as in "C" ("cee), then it's "a."

so it's "an RDL."

I would also like to expand on LBSS's statement.

If the first letter's name starts with a vowel sounding letter then it would be an e.g. an RDL (an ar dee el)

but if it has a consonant sound but is a vowel then it would be a.
e.g. a UDL (a yuu dee el)

but if it starts with a consonant but the sounding can differ between people
e.g. a HUV (a haich yu vee) with consonant sound or
an HUV (an aich yu vee) with vowel sound.

so it depends on the letters starting sound.
that was fun lol
----------------------------------------------------------------
So, verily, with every difficulty, there is relief.
Holy Quran 94:5
-------------------------------------------------------------
Measuring reminder:
5 toe to heel steps = 148cm
------------------------------------------------------------------------

�Strength comes from the legs, Power comes from the torso and Speed comes from the arm.� � Al Vermeil

My Progress Log
A Journey to Running fast and Jumping High

seifullaah73

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3098
  • Respect: +1196
    • View Profile
    • Email
Re: The proper English thread
« Reply #9 on: February 01, 2016, 03:57:29 pm »
0
One of the thing I find strange of English is it seems to take the approach of 'make the rule as you go along'

such as why is 'put' sound like 'pʊt' but 'gut' or 'rut' is pronounced with a 'gət'

the vowels are the same but the letters are different, which should change the vowel sound.

but regarding paid and payed that payed is for letting out rope, cable or sealing the deck or hull of a ship and paid is finance.
« Last Edit: February 01, 2016, 04:02:36 pm by seifullaah73 »
----------------------------------------------------------------
So, verily, with every difficulty, there is relief.
Holy Quran 94:5
-------------------------------------------------------------
Measuring reminder:
5 toe to heel steps = 148cm
------------------------------------------------------------------------

�Strength comes from the legs, Power comes from the torso and Speed comes from the arm.� � Al Vermeil

My Progress Log
A Journey to Running fast and Jumping High

Raptor

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 14464
  • Respect: +2393
    • Yahoo Instant Messenger - raptorescu
    • View Profile
    • Email
Re: The proper English thread
« Reply #10 on: February 01, 2016, 04:07:23 pm »
0
Why does the verb "play" has the form "played" but "pay" has the form "paid"?

Great question and I have no idea. Weirdly, "paid" is said like "played" but "said" is said like "head".

As an aside, "paid" vs. "payed" actually depends on the sense in which you're using "pay." There's the normal meaning of give someone money for something. There's also a more esoteric meaning about letting out rope that can be conjugated "payed."

Someone told me it has to do with the verb being an irregular verb or whatever, I have no idea, I never did English in school or English grammar so I don't know what that means. I guess it's some sort of strange form for a few verbs.

seifullaah73

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3098
  • Respect: +1196
    • View Profile
    • Email
Re: The proper English thread
« Reply #11 on: February 01, 2016, 06:33:23 pm »
0
Why does the verb "play" has the form "played" but "pay" has the form "paid"?

Great question and I have no idea. Weirdly, "paid" is said like "played" but "said" is said like "head".

As an aside, "paid" vs. "payed" actually depends on the sense in which you're using "pay." There's the normal meaning of give someone money for something. There's also a more esoteric meaning about letting out rope that can be conjugated "payed."

Someone told me it has to do with the verb being an irregular verb or whatever, I have no idea, I never did English in school or English grammar so I don't know what that means. I guess it's some sort of strange form for a few verbs.

irregular verbs to me are just exception verbs that don't follow the rule.
such as shake, i would think past is shaked and past participle is shaken but past is shook.
----------------------------------------------------------------
So, verily, with every difficulty, there is relief.
Holy Quran 94:5
-------------------------------------------------------------
Measuring reminder:
5 toe to heel steps = 148cm
------------------------------------------------------------------------

�Strength comes from the legs, Power comes from the torso and Speed comes from the arm.� � Al Vermeil

My Progress Log
A Journey to Running fast and Jumping High

Dreyth

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2776
  • Respect: +821
    • View Profile
    • Email
Re: The proper English thread
« Reply #12 on: February 02, 2016, 11:20:02 am »
+1
Here's one I like to tell people

Through
Remove the r and you get...
Though. You think it would be pronounced "thoo" instead its "tho." actually its a harder th sound, "dho"
Remove the h and you get...
Tough. You think it would be pronounced like toe/finger. Nope. Now it's "tuff"

wtf?
I'm LAKERS from The Vertical Summit

LBSS

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 11301
  • plugging away...
  • Respect: +5813
    • View Profile
    • Email
Re: The proper English thread
« Reply #13 on: February 02, 2016, 11:40:37 am »
0
Here's one I like to tell people

Through
Remove the r and you get...
Though. You think it would be pronounced "thoo" instead its "tho." actually its a harder th sound, "dho"
Remove the h and you get...
Tough. You think it would be pronounced like toe/finger. Nope. Now it's "tuff"

wtf?

you're just scratching the surface of "ough," though.

through (oo)
though (oh)
tough (uff)
bough (ow)
thought (ɒ)
cough (off)
Muscles are nonsensical they have nothing to do with this bullshit.

- Avishek

handstand + backflip + flag

Raptor

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 14464
  • Respect: +2393
    • Yahoo Instant Messenger - raptorescu
    • View Profile
    • Email
Re: The proper English thread
« Reply #14 on: February 02, 2016, 12:45:14 pm »
0
Why do people say to cough, "cough"? Doesn't make any sense. I mean, when they're describing the act of coughing, the sound of it.