Author Topic: Endurance & Temperature  (Read 911 times)

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adarqui

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Endurance & Temperature
« on: September 18, 2016, 03:11:00 pm »
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pvplvspdlvsd

adarqui

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Re: Endurance & Temperature
« Reply #1 on: September 18, 2016, 03:11:40 pm »
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http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2010/11/03/phys-ed-will-training-in-the-heat-improve-your-performance/?_r=0

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The cyclists who were heat acclimated performed anywhere from 4 to 8 percent better than they had before they trained in the heat, while the control group did not improve at all.

adarqui

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Re: Endurance & Temperature
« Reply #2 on: September 18, 2016, 03:27:46 pm »
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http://www.runningstrong.com/temperature.html

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Let's say your athlete has previously turned in a 3:00 marathon in cool temperatures (40 degrees F). Today's race day dawns with a WBGT temperature of 60 degrees F (15 C). Based on this research, it's reasonable to anticipate they'll be about 6% slower than they would be at around 40F. If you do the math for your 3:00 marathoner, you'll find it changes the anticipated finish time to about a 3:10. Pace per mile should be adjusted from the "planned" 6:52 to a more realistic 7:17. Failure to take the environmental conditions into account will likely come with a penalty later in the race!

adarqui

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Re: Endurance & Temperature
« Reply #3 on: October 04, 2016, 10:31:11 am »
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saw someone quote this in a running chat:

10:28 < Mattias> Found it! "While all running improves blood volume, a 2012 study from New Zealand documented significantly increased plasma volume and performance following training in the heat, with the stipulation that mild dehydration (no more than 2 percent) must be allowed to occur to reap the full benefit. Runner's  World's Alex Hutchinson noted in his blog, Sweat Science, that studies like this illustrate "the importance of allowing your body to undergo training-induced stresses, rather than making heroic efforts to cushion your body from discomfort...[Leaving] the water bottle at home may be a good call.""

nice.