Author Topic: Vertical Jump  (Read 13361 times)

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adarqui

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Vertical Jump
« on: June 07, 2009, 02:45:04 am »
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Of course there could be a million studies in here.. There are some other VJ studies in the other topics, but regardless, any study related to vertical jump can be put in here.



1. The influence of squat depth on maximal vertical jump performance

Quote
Because jumping from a deep squat is rarely practised, it is unlikely that these jumps were optimally coordinated by the participants. Differences in experimental vertical ground reaction force patterns also suggest that jumps from a deep squat are not optimally coordinated. These results suggest there is the potential for athletes to increase jump performance by exploiting a greater range of motion.




2. Effects of ballistic training on preseason preparation of elite volleyball players.

Quote
The treatment group produced a significant increase in both SJR (STANDING JUMP) and AJR (APPROACH JUMP) of 5.9 +/- 3.1% and 6.3 +/- 5.1%, respectively. These increases were significantly greater than the pre- to postchanges produced by the control group, which were not significant for either jump. Analysis of the data from the various other jump tests suggested increased overall force output during jumping, and in particular increased rate of force development were the main contributors to the increased jump height.

Conclusions: These results lend support to the effectiveness of ballistic resistance training for improving vertical jump performance in elite jump athletes.






3. INFLUENCE OF TRAINING BACKGROUND ON JUMPING HEIGHT

Quote
The power-trained
group jumped significantly higher (p
0.05) than the BB and
PA groups (0.40
0.05, 0.31
0.04, and 0.30
0.05, respec-
tively). The difference in jumping height was not produced by
higher rates of force development (RFD) and shorter center of
mass (CM) displacement. Instead, the PT group had greater CM
excursion (p
0.05) than the other groups. The PT and BB
groups had a high correlation between jumping height and 1RM
test (r
0.93 and r
0.89, p
0.05, respectively). In conclusion,
maximum strength seems to be important for jumping height,
but RFD does not seem relevant to achieve maximum jumping
heights. High RFD jumps should be performed during training
only when sport skills have a time constraint for force applica-
tion

adarqui

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Re: Vertical Jump
« Reply #1 on: June 07, 2009, 02:46:39 am »
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zgin

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Re: Vertical Jump
« Reply #2 on: March 18, 2010, 08:07:16 pm »
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wow squid would probably get a massive erection if he discovered that the rfd wasnt important in jumping.
37.5

DamienZ

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Re: Vertical Jump
« Reply #3 on: November 28, 2010, 11:26:26 am »
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adarqui

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Re: Vertical Jump
« Reply #4 on: November 28, 2010, 01:40:58 pm »
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http://athletesunited.net/Articles/TrainingforVert.htm i really liked this article!

very nice article, quick overview & nice comparison charts.. very useful.

peace!

DamienZ

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Re: Vertical Jump
« Reply #5 on: November 28, 2010, 02:24:26 pm »
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i really found it interesting that at some point just max strength squatting will make you slower if you don't incorporate any explosive work or jumps

adarqui

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Re: Vertical Jump
« Reply #6 on: November 29, 2010, 02:00:35 am »
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i really found it interesting that at some point just max strength squatting will make you slower if you don't incorporate any explosive work or jumps

yup, regardless of explosive work, excessive strength work can still cause decreases in RFD, especially when the weights get very big. If one is allowed to move heavy weight slowly, then those gains in strength won't translate well to improving explosive strength, at all, in fact it will hurt it.. for example, say you squat 2xBW in 2s, well, if you become squat-obsessed and end up squatting 2.5xBW in 5-6 seconds, those gains in maximal strength past 2x probably won't transfer well to explosive movements.. an emphasis on bar speed has to be there, otherwise you're just training slow like a power lifter.. oly lifters with huge squats, usually do them very fast.. check the 69kg lifter thread in the oly lifting subforum, boevsky 3.6xBW squat, very fast.. then check his oly lifting performance.. just clean's the bar like it's nothing.. so ya that power translates, but obviously, if he had a 3.6xBW PL squat that takes 5+ seconds, that power definitely wouldn't be there in his oly's/explosive movements.

pc

steven-miller

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Re: Vertical Jump
« Reply #7 on: November 29, 2010, 08:25:28 pm »
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It is sort of funny to read what scholars have to say about the topic of VJ training. I am extremely skeptical towards this information because it is usually based on poorly designed research with limited application value. The information in the article is really shallow, especially regarding appropriate training design. It is just stating conventional wisdom and many points can be debated. I heavily disagree with the standard advice to use a periodization model for everything regardless of training level and I think this is just a waste of time and display of a poor understanding of what will be necessary for example for an athlete without previous exposure to strength training.
The hesitancy on the topic of heavy vs. light loads for strength training I find especially amusing. Those guys are seriously suggesting that it MIGHT be good to let an athlete do "strength" training with <70% of his 1rm? This MIGHT be better because it does not take as long to lift the load? There are so many things wrong and illogical about this thought, that not even the opposite is true and one has to doubt if those people have actually put any thought into this instead of blindly adopting things others have said before to give apology for their idiotic research.

Regarding squat strength: Lifting a heavy weight will slow the lift down. A 1rm will look rather slow for the squat, otherwise it is not a 1rm. The last 1 or 2 reps of a 5rm might look rather similar. Here is the thing though: After you got those last 2 rather slow reps, you might next time be able to do the same number of reps with 5 lbs more and in a month you might have a 5rm considerably heavier than previously. The last reps of that new 5rm will still look slow, but how does the set look like with your previous 5rm weight? Probably not so slow anymore - I think everyone can follow that thought. Now, will that squat strength transfer to gains in the VJ? No, not if the guy training is in fact more advanced than a novice strength trainee. But we are doing resisted explosive lifts, right? See, they do take care of that problem ridiculously well if used correctly. What happened during the heavy training though is that we gained strength and muscle which makes progress in the explosive lifts a lot easier which in turn helps with jumping tremendously.
Now, when we would instead have trained with super light weights, what would have happened is that maybe we would have gotten a little stronger and that strength might even be relatively transferable to a VJ. But the gains would have been vastly inferior considering the trainee did stall in a power phase earlier on. The reason being that max strength, a necessary component of power, would still be a limiting factor.
« Last Edit: November 29, 2010, 08:27:09 pm by steven-miller »

Dreyth

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Re: Vertical Jump
« Reply #8 on: February 02, 2011, 12:53:10 pm »
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for example, say you squat 2xBW in 2s, well, if you become squat-obsessed and end up squatting 2.5xBW in 5-6 seconds, those gains in maximal strength past 2x probably won't transfer well to explosive movements

Agreed. However, consider this possibility:

Athlete A:

Squats 2.0xbw in 2s

Three months later

Squats 2.5xbw in 4s
Squats 2.0xbw in 1.75s

I think going from a 2xbw squat to a 2.5xbw squat is more effective in increasing the amount of time it takes to squat 2xbw (in terms of how long the rep takes) versus incorporating RFD work and not increasing to a 2.5xbw squat.
Not only that, but the RFD work may fade away over time once you switch to more strength oriented work, and you wouldn't be able to keep up with that 2xbw squatting speed.

I prefer strength work over RFD work pretty much all the time. Plyos, on the other hand, are a bit of a different story imo (yes I know they increase RFD as well).


I'm LAKERS from The Vertical Summit

Raptor

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Re: Vertical Jump
« Reply #9 on: February 02, 2011, 03:40:12 pm »
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I agree with Lakers...

The lower a % your whatever squat is (2x in this case) of your 1RM, the faster you'll usually move it.

adarqui

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Re: Vertical Jump
« Reply #10 on: February 03, 2011, 09:08:47 pm »
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for example, say you squat 2xBW in 2s, well, if you become squat-obsessed and end up squatting 2.5xBW in 5-6 seconds, those gains in maximal strength past 2x probably won't transfer well to explosive movements

Agreed. However, consider this possibility:

Athlete A:

Squats 2.0xbw in 2s

Three months later

Squats 2.5xbw in 4s
Squats 2.0xbw in 1.75s

I think going from a 2xbw squat to a 2.5xbw squat is more effective in increasing the amount of time it takes to squat 2xbw (in terms of how long the rep takes) versus incorporating RFD work and not increasing to a 2.5xbw squat.

well sure but i'm talking incorporating RFD work WHILE you increase to 2.5xBW squat.. i'm saying that has to be utilized, to make sure squat gains always have a speed emphasis.. explosive RFD work while utilizing max strength methods, results in faster reps than if you had just been squatting alone, at least that's been my experience and what i've seen in the field..


Quote
Not only that, but the RFD work may fade away over time once you switch to more strength oriented work, and you wouldn't be able to keep up with that 2xbw squatting speed.

to me, it's not about it 'fading', it's about using it as a constant tool to stimulate/potentiate better squat/jump sessions.

sure it fades fast, but that's because the body 'wants to get slower' to lift more weight.. it's a highly type IIa low velocity stimulus.




Quote
I prefer strength work over RFD work pretty much all the time. Plyos, on the other hand, are a bit of a different story imo (yes I know they increase RFD as well).

yes most of us need strength work more than pure rfd work, that's if we had to choose.. but i'm for both concurrently.

ya plyos are still RFD work.. for resistance RFD work, I like REA squat, jump squat, and/or REA low squat ankle hops.

really love those REA LSAH's.

pc

Dreyth

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Re: Vertical Jump
« Reply #11 on: February 06, 2011, 12:54:31 pm »
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Oh and I'm still confused about some stuff on RFD "vs" plyos. Like is there a need to do resisted RFD when you can just do plyos? I'm asking because plyos also increase explosive strength as well as elastic strength, and I feel like you'll get more bang for your buck doing an extra set of depth jumps versus a few sets of paused weighted jumps squats.
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adarqui

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Re: Vertical Jump
« Reply #12 on: February 06, 2011, 06:17:51 pm »
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Oh and I'm still confused about some stuff on RFD "vs" plyos. Like is there a need to do resisted RFD when you can just do plyos? I'm asking because plyos also increase explosive strength as well as elastic strength, and I feel like you'll get more bang for your buck doing an extra set of depth jumps versus a few sets of paused weighted jumps squats.

well I prefer reactive/plyos over traditional rfd work (jump squat, oly's), for sure, but traditional rfd work is more necessary for people who are interested in SVJ.

regardless, depth jumps can still improve SVJ.. other reactive work, for example, bounds & other rebounding drills, are less effective at increasing RFD without considerable preloading..

so, if you're more into RVJ (short run ups or full), then ya, you could definitely just focus completely on reactive work.. your more intense exercises would be:

- depth jumps & single leg bounds

Accessory reactive work would be:
- MR drills (half tucks, pogos, double leg bounds)
- jump rope/sprints

so, when it comes to generating forces without considerable preload, oly's/jump squats/rea squat etc will yield more gains.

pc

Dreyth

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Re: Vertical Jump
« Reply #13 on: February 09, 2011, 12:20:20 am »
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Well I mean there's still significant reactive "activity" for lack of a better term in the SVJ, and since depth jumps increase "voluntary RFD" as well as "involuntary RFD" I feel like there's really no need for traditional RFD work unless added in for variety.
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adarqui

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Re: Vertical Jump
« Reply #14 on: May 09, 2011, 11:18:17 pm »
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add these to index when you get "unlazy":



http://www.springerlink.com/content/w0281m2811x34132/