Author Topic: Innate potential of the human organism - Intensification of training  (Read 6659 times)

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adarqui

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3 hours sleep, pulled quad, ya im proud of this jump:



What are we capable of, as athletes? Are we to accept our "genetic destiny" without a fight? Are we to believe that in order to truly achieve elite gains, we need to accept anabolic drug use, though our body can readily produce these compounds through intensification of training? Why does a guy like t-dub jump ~50 inches at age 18, and continue to jump this high the rest of his athletic life, but not more? Why do most high school track & field athletes running insane 100m numbers rarely improve their times considerably throughout college and the rest of their career? Why do we need to gain weight to get stronger when our body's are capable of so much more?

To understand the rest of this blog, you'll need to go over this small concept from my Verkhoshansky notes posted on this site, and subsequently found on http://verkhoshansky.com:

Quote
innate potential of the human organism:
- reserves employed in reactive movements (15%)
- physiological reserves employed under conditions of elevated motor activity (20%)
- special reserves mobilized only under conditions of muscle performance of great intensity or long duration (35%)
^^ inhibited by the CNS
- innate defended reserves mobilized only in extreme, life threatening situations (30%)
^^ inhibited by the CNS

these reserves not accessible regardless of the intensity of the volutional effort without special long term training.

the cns mechanism controlling the mobilization of the contractile function of muscles of gymnists gradually is perfected during many years of training - making it possible to realize the motor potential fully (including the special reserves) in a volitional effort).

the application of special reserves with traditional methods of SPP, through strength of will impulse, becomes increasingly difficult and involves major time & energy by the athlete.

the subsequent increase of the special work capacity level requires increases in the force (intensity) of the training.

"consequently it is necessary to create the training conditions that will force the body to mobilize the hidden (concealed) functional reserves and to form central nervous system mechanisms for their application, ie to make them accessible for mobilization from strength of will impulse"

The difference between every single athlete, lies in their natural ability to tap into their special & innate reserves, the "force production potential" that is protected from us, due to evolutionary and safety reasons. Regardless of biomechanical differences, we are all able to achieve elite level performance, for this one simple reason: elite level performance is inherently human, anything less is a lack of development of the human organism. We are all capable of insane jumping ability, blazing speed, extremely high levels of fitness & strength, and great endurance capabilities. Anything less than elite performance, is "sub human", ie, a "negative adaptation due to society, food, sex, technology, etc. (negative regarding performance, positive in other regards)". Not having to hunt for our food would be an example, not having to worry about being hunted for food would be another.

So what does that mean? It means some people have it easier than others starting out, naturally due to genetic variation, but we all have very similar athletic potential at the rawest levels.

A guy like t-dub, disregarding his biomechanical leverages, grew up being able to utilize a higher percentage of his special & innate reserves than most athletes. For some reason, those energetic reserves were "less protected" to him specifically. This lead to adaptations, over the course of his development, until full maturity. One of the most explosive athletes on this planet is the result of these adaptations over the course of his chronological development. But now what? Why doesn't he jump 55? Why doesn't he jump 60? Is it possible, probably. The reason he doesn't achieve these numbers is very simple:

"consequently it is necessary to create the training conditions that will force the body to mobilize the hidden (concealed) functional reserves and to form central nervous system mechanisms for their application, ie to make them accessible for mobilization from strength of will impulse" -- Verkhoshansky

Though I do not know t-dub, I (& other coaches) can pretty much say, without a doubt, that he has "failed to intensify his training" (natural athleticism, no weights), thus further adaptations cannot take place. Therefore, t-dub has remained in a state of stagnation, albeit insanely impressive stagnation, for quite some time. Athletes who fail to improve their performance are ALL subject to what has caused t-dub to fail at improving his performance, the failure to intensify the training regime & cause further adaptations to occur.

Since we are all human, we all are subject to this very same issue, the only difference is where along the spectrum we naturally fit into as individuals. Using running vertical jump as an example, my true "stagnation point" may be 27" RVJ, T-DUB's may be 52", someone elses might be 44" RVJ, yet another 35". Some may be thinking, "how is your stagnation point 27 inch RVJ if you're nearly jumping 40 inches?". The answer: intensification of training. I can guarantee you I put in just as much, if not more work than t-dub on the basketball court growing up. I worked my a$$ off, basketball was my dream. I jumped max all of the time, barely nicking the rim with my fingertip until age 24, where I finally got a few inches of my fingers over due to being extremely lean from boxing. So, given all of that work on that court, jumping, sprinting, boxing, bodyweight exercises, etc, I had never achieved anything even remotely close to what I currently have. Why? Again, I had to progressively intensify my training regime to achieve my current results. What did that take? Well for example, I struggled with a 1xBW squat for 4 reps at 6'1 147 lb at 26 years old, yet I was in the best condition of my life due to boxing. Now i'm ~152 squatting 325 for 5 at the same depth. The ~1.2xBW to ~2.5xBW increase in squat is not the point, the ability to tap into protected motor potential, is. There's a 5 lb difference between then and now, and I was actually leaner then, due to my intense conditioning/boxing routine. I'm still skinny as hell, so it's obviously not muscle gain. What changed? My ability to tap into protected motor potential improved & of course some physiological changes to tendon, fasciae, and muscle, though not much.

Constantly challenging yourself under the bar & intensifying the regime, is what causes these adaptations. If a near maximal weight causes you to elevate HR and "worry about being safe" prior to lifting it, what happens when you've made a 50 lb gain in your 1RM? That weight won't give you the same physiological stress response that it once did, thus, training at that old poundage would eventually result in detraining. It also means that you are now tapping into more motor potential than you once were. What will it take for me to achieve my goal of 47" RVJ? The exact same thing I've been doing, progressively intensifying the training regime, making strength gains, becoming more "fit", improving my work capacity, etc. For example, that might mean going from 2.5xBW half squat to 3.0xBW half squat while getting in even more total work each week under the bar. That type of training doesn't get any easier, it in fact gets harder. If your goal is a 20 inch vert gain, the first 10 are going to seem hard at the time, but compared to the next 10 inches, looking back it will look like a walk in the park. Intensification of training never gets easier, it ALWAYS gets harder, otherwise it wouldn't be called intensification now would it? Challenging yourself means:

"... to create the training conditions that will force the body to mobilize the hidden (concealed) functional reserves and to form central nervous system mechanisms for their application, ie to make them accessible for mobilization from strength of will impulse" -- Verkhoshansky

An elevation in HR, nervousness, self doubt, increased ventilation rate, increased focus, self talk, pacing back and forth, and many others, are all signs that you are intensifying the regime. There should be at LEAST 2 training sessions per week which set forth these symptoms, if not, what are you doing, sounds like you're deloading or maintaining (nothing wrong with that, but it needs to be defined).

Some athletes spend their entire lives in stagnation, will you?

Athletes who constantly look for shortcuts will never understand or realize the brevity of Verkhoshansky's quote, and thus will never realize an impressive transformation in athleticism.

Like I said in a thread recently today, in regards to gaining weight to squat more: "If someone were to stab you with an adrenaline shot, why then are you able to squat more without gaining weight?" => SPECIAL & INNATE RESERVES => PERCENTAGES OF SPECIAL/INNATE RESERVES ARE NOW LESS PROTECTED. This means that in fact you do not have to gain weight to squat more, instead you need to intensify the training regime over time to tap into those protected reserves through "voluntarily strength of will", ie, when you say go, your body gives you more.

I will leave you with another quote, read them, think about them, realize that we are all capable of so much more, it's already inside of us. It's about getting in there and digging it out through intensification of training.

"Nature has provided man with the possibility to enhance his abilities in extreme situations, and we need to utilize it in the training of the high class athlete." -- Prof. Yuri Verkhoshansky


Some athletes spend their entire lives in stagnation, will you?

(ps: none of the Verkhoshansky quotes promote drug use, they are in fact anti drug use, "nature has provided", ie, it already exists within us, the end.)

lamp

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Re: Innate potential of the human organism - Intensification of training
« Reply #1 on: March 15, 2011, 01:31:41 am »
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Well said man...



I hope you don't think I believe drug use to be essentially for improving athletic performance

would it help...obviously

is it necessary...no



One question i have for you is: 

eventually you will reach a plateau on your squat, how do you plan further "intensify" after that? 

Furthermore, I assume (but please correct me if I am wrong), that following this "intensification", when you returned to squatting your squat would increase beyond your plateau, which is what happened when you described the transformation from 1xbw to your current abilities, no?


lamp

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Re: Innate potential of the human organism - Intensification of training
« Reply #2 on: March 15, 2011, 01:32:18 am »
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as an extension to your intensification question, how would someone like t-dub intensify and provide a training stimulus?

adarqui

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Re: Innate potential of the human organism - Intensification of training
« Reply #3 on: March 15, 2011, 01:56:51 am »
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Well said man...

thanks man




Quote
I hope you don't think I believe drug use to be essentially for improving athletic performance

would it help...obviously

is it necessary...no

nah man i'm not going at you specifically, i'm going at the mindset that drugs would even "help". I think the risks of drugs far outweigh the benefits, which make the "would it help - yes" and turn it into a "would it help - no". The body's negative feedback systems just get overrided on anabolics, which can lead to a wide variety of issues including tendon tears & joint issues. When your body gives you more through the use of drugs, especially through muscular hypertrophy, the risk to joint & tendon increase greatly because those adaptations simply do not happen as fast as hypertrophy gains.

If you are training using some advanced methods, without the use of anabolics, you will be able to listen to your body much better in terms of when to push and when to hold back/rest. On anabolics or a host of other drugs, that negative feedback either doesn't occur or is ignored for whatever reason. This is where things get dangerous. If your body is telling you something, listen to it, those feedback responses get muffled while on anabolics.

So in the long run, I don't see PED's being beneficial or helpful in the least.







Quote
One question i have for you is: 

eventually you will reach a plateau on your squat, how do you plan further "intensify" after that? 

Well, i've already been close to plateauing. "close" because i'm still making progressive yet small gains. For myself specifically, I am utilizing squats at different depths to provide more overload at higher depths, just to get my body used to the tension. For example, last night I squatted 355 off pin 6, and 385 off pin 7, which is about a 2-3 inch difference. Both of those were PR's given my weight, and I had done a 2 hour dunk session in the afternoon earlier, all on 3 hours sleep, so I am hopeful my recent training changes are kicking in already. Those recent changes to my training include: higher frequency squatting. I've been squatting multiple times per day, submax, in order to "stay primed" and train my brain in the sense that, I am trying to trick it into "believing I am in a new environment where I have to perform multiple times per day, near max intensity". So it's sort of a form of psychological training using resistance. I want my body to understand it has to "adapt or die", but not give it enough stimulus (95+% max) that would cause it to "shut down" and hold back. So far so good, given the recent PR's under those circumstances, and the fact that I am easily squatting 315 lb singles today the day following on a low calorie diet, I think it's working out good so far. But that is my current intensification of training, hope that helps. Here's the last few days squatting:

- 03/08/2011: 3 sessions of pin 6 squat: 225 x 5 {6pm, 7pm, 10pm}, one heavy half squat session also
- 03/09/2011: 4 sessions of pin 6 squat {3:30pm=225x5, 5:30pm=225x5, 2am=245x5, 4am=225x5}
- 03/10/2011: 2 sessions of pin 6 squat {11pm=225x10, 12:30am=225x10}, 2 heavy half squat sessions also
- 03/11/2011: 3 sessions of pin 6 squat {6pm=225x10, 9pm=225x10, 1am=225x10}
- 03/12/2011: 3 sessions of pin 6 squat {6pm=245x5, 9pm=245x5, 1:40am=245x5}
- 03/13/2011: 1 session of pin 6 squat {10am=225x5}, dunking, heavy squat session at night
- 03/14/2011: 3 sessions of pin 6 squat {7:30pm=135x10,225x5,275x5,295x1,315x1}, {11:30pm={135x8,225x5,275x5,295x1,315x1}, {3am={135x8,225x5,275x5,295x1,315x1}

the 3am session for today is written in, in advance.. all of the "heavy squat sessions" lsted, were all over 315 lb for reps etc.

so you can see my overall workload for each week has drastically increased, mostly due to the big increase in frequency..

so far so good, I feel crazy since i've started this on 3/08/2011.. I should be setting some PR's as long as i'm jumping well rested, hopefully wednesday indoor.




Quote
Furthermore, I assume (but please correct me if I am wrong), that following this "intensification", when you returned to squatting your squat would increase beyond your plateau, which is what happened when you described the transformation from 1xbw to your current abilities, no?

well the intensification of training doesn't necessarily mean there has to be a "delay" in the adaptations.. most of my training is not centered around delayed results, i try to stay as close to "peak" ability as possible, in terms of being able to achieve my true 1RM or true jumps at least 1x/week. But yes, something like a concentrated block would definitely have that effect, having squat stay the same or go down during the block, then have it be realized following the block by reducing volume or frequency gradually.

peace man!!

aiir

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Re: Innate potential of the human organism - Intensification of training
« Reply #4 on: March 15, 2011, 02:01:13 am »
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Nice blog....
Though now b/c of you I won't be able to sleep haha ;D
Log

"Everybody look at you strange, say you changed -
 Like you really work that hard, to stay the same."
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adarqui

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Re: Innate potential of the human organism - Intensification of training
« Reply #5 on: March 15, 2011, 02:02:55 am »
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as an extension to your intensification question, how would someone like t-dub intensify and provide a training stimulus?

He would have to prepare using normal methods for a while, so he could become acclimated to the various lifts, low level reactive exercises etc. Initially it would only have a minor stimulatory effect. After a year or more, for example, he would then be able to utilize more advanced methods successfully, such as stim, frequency, shock-like protocols, etc.. We don't know how much "potential" he has left, so he'd have to push himself just like us and get to the point where he's lifting some maximal weights, good form etc. Regardless of what he eventually achieves, which I imagine would be impressive, it would still have the same effect.. So stuff like stim & frequency could greatly potentiate his jump sessions, maximal lifting could allow him to tap into even more motor potential voluntarily, and shock would achieve both of the things I just mentioned to an even greater degree..

I'm pretty sure he has more in the tank, we're talking around 60" max RVJ jumping ability or slightly lower. He's already around 52" RVJ max, no reason he couldn't use the traditional methods to tap into more motor potential AND get structurally stronger.

it would be freaky :D

adarqui

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Re: Innate potential of the human organism - Intensification of training
« Reply #6 on: March 15, 2011, 02:03:59 am »
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Nice blog....
Though now b/c of you I won't be able to sleep haha ;D

lmao, told you.. :F

pc

adarqui

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Re: Innate potential of the human organism - Intensification of training
« Reply #7 on: March 15, 2011, 02:23:57 am »
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Nice blog....

thanks man

Quote
Though now b/c of you I won't be able to sleep haha ;D

lmao, told u :F

dirksilver

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Re: Innate potential of the human organism - Intensification of training
« Reply #8 on: March 15, 2011, 04:43:33 am »
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nice post man! makes me want to work harder!...makes me feel more confident that i can do more and better also!

Raptor

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Re: Innate potential of the human organism - Intensification of training
« Reply #9 on: March 15, 2011, 07:02:01 am »
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Good post, but I don't get this PED hate. Everything you do can be considered "cheating". Training is cheating. Resting is cheating. Having money to buy better food is cheating. And by "cheating" I mean improving beyond your natural ability. Just because PEDs do the job fast and good doesn't mean that's cheating. Cheating does not exist.

Oh, yeah, it exists if you sign a paper where you say you won't use PEDs, I agree with that. But in terms of achieving maximal human potential quick and good, PEDs are good for that. Don't see anything wrong with that, if you decide to take them.

LBSS

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Re: Innate potential of the human organism - Intensification of training
« Reply #10 on: March 15, 2011, 09:56:30 am »
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Just reading the post made my heart beat faster and breathing get shallower. Amped. Too bad it's 10 AM and I won't get to the gym until at least 6:30 PM. Need to calm down and re-read right before I leave work.
Muscles are nonsensical they have nothing to do with this bullshit.

- Avishek

sunday: long very easy run 80+ mins @ 5:40+ (14+ km)
monday: strength/cross training
tuesday: easy run 60+ mins @ 5:20-5:30 (11+ km)
wednesday: fartlek (mostly easy pace with mix of strides, hills, long tempo) 45 mins (8+ km)
thursday: easy run 60+ mins @ 5:20-5:30 (11+ km), strength/cross-training
friday: rest
saturday: short tempo 6-8x500 @ sub-4:00 (7 km)

strength would be:
- hops 2x10
- box jumps or ME SVJ 2x5
- squats 3x6-8 or weighted BSS/lunges 3x10/leg
- RDL/hypers 2x10-12 or SLRDL 2x10-12/leg
- upper push myo-reps or sets to technical failure
- upper pull myo-reps or sets to technical failure
- leg raises, holds, pallof presses

lamp

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Re: Innate potential of the human organism - Intensification of training
« Reply #11 on: March 15, 2011, 10:05:16 am »
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Good post, but I don't get this PED hate. Everything you do can be considered "cheating". Training is cheating. Resting is cheating. Having money to buy better food is cheating. And by "cheating" I mean improving beyond your natural ability. Just because PEDs do the job fast and good doesn't mean that's cheating. Cheating does not exist.

Oh, yeah, it exists if you sign a paper where you say you won't use PEDs, I agree with that. But in terms of achieving maximal human potential quick and good, PEDs are good for that. Don't see anything wrong with that, if you decide to take them.

I think adarq is saying none of us have even come close to reaching our non-enhanced potential... so why use PEDS

Raptor

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Re: Innate potential of the human organism - Intensification of training
« Reply #12 on: March 15, 2011, 02:41:53 pm »
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Well yeah, there's nothing wrong in not using PEDs, just as much as there's nothing wrong in using them.

swishhboy25

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Re: Innate potential of the human organism - Intensification of training
« Reply #13 on: March 15, 2011, 02:58:29 pm »
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I really like this post, real inspiring and has some real life experience to it too. How exactly would one intensify training? Like for example I'm doing just an introductory strength & conditioning base, gaining mass and strength at the same time. You on the other hand mentinoed getting better without gainnig weight. How would I achieve this? I'm always trying to increase my load and progress, how do i know when to stop, and change things?

vag

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Re: Innate potential of the human organism - Intensification of training
« Reply #14 on: March 15, 2011, 04:30:53 pm »
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Agree with everyone , awesome post!  :highfive:
woot