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adarqui

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Maximum Strength Effort Method
« on: February 05, 2010, 05:02:11 am »
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Blog #1: 2/05/2010: Maximal Strength Effort Method

By: Andrew Darqui



*** Keep in mind this method is intended for intermediate athletes who have plenty of experience, or advanced athletes. Beginners shouldn't play with the stuff in this blog entry. ***


When people think about performing one rep (singles), they always think about maxing out (1RM lifting). There is a method out there which utilizes single repetitions in order to improve maximal & explosive strength. This method is formally referred to as the "Maximal Strength Effort Method" (MSEM) as described by Verkhoshansky (http://www.verkhoshansky.com). I have found this method to be extremely effective, from experience in my own training & for those who I have coached.


  • MSEM improves Max strength (MxS) & Explosive Strength (ExS)


Improving maximal strength (MxS) & explosive strength (ExS) are both very important for athletic performance. When ExS reaches a certain limit or threshold, the most effective way to improve it further is to improve your MxS. ExS is the ability to produce maximal tension in minimal time, this is what we see in sport, whether it be jumps, acceleration, or change of direction. Simply put, if you produce the same force in less time, or produce more force in the same amount of time, you will jump higher or run faster.


  • MSEM improves the ability of your muscles to relax following an intense contraction


Not only does MSEM improve MxS & ExS, it also improves the ability of your muscles to relax following an intense contraction. This becomes especially important in sport, because it means you recover sooner in between explosive movements. A faster recovery allows for replenishment of high energy substrates (fuel, ATP-CP) sooner, which allows for an even more powerful contraction - this offers a significant enhancement in cyclic activities such as sprinting.


  • MSEM reduces fatigue & soreness, increases CNS stimulation


Another very important aspect of MSEM is the effect it has on your central nervous system (CNS) & musculoskeletel system. When comparing MSEM versus 5x5, MSEM leads to much less CNS fatigue, as well as barely any soreness or fatigue. In fact, from my own personal accounts with MSEM, it is a potent CNS stimulator; power and nervous system excitability are increased. This makes MSEM a perfect tool to be used in the pre-season or in-season.


  • MSEM increases strength without an appreciable increase in body mass


Finally, for those athletes wishing to improve power without an increase in body weight, MSEM becomes a valuable tool. Increasing power without an increase in muscle mass is not the easiest thing to do, but it can be done. Since MSEM is low volume & uses single repetitions, instead of consecutive repetitions, there simply is not enough time under tension (TUT) to cause any sort of significant hypertrophy (increase in muscle size). Instead, MSEM improves power by improving maximal strength and the rate at which muscle fibers fire (rate coding).The rate at which muscle fibers fire, has an important impact on rate force development (RFD), because this firing frequency directly affects two of rfd's main components: starting strength & acceleration strength.



  • MSEM can help to break out of traditional strength training ruts


Utilizing moderate/high volume + high intensity (> 75 to < 90% 1RM) strength training programs for too long can lead to negative effects on RFD & various hormones. Though traditional strength training programs (TSTP's) such as 5x5 increase lean muscle mass far better than does MSEM, TSTP's are notorious for causing RFD to "shfit to the right", in other words, TSTP's can cause one to produce more force in a greater amount of time (not good). The reason this happens is simple: Heavy consecutive repetition lifts require that the body & muscle groups involved maintain a high amount of tension for a significant amount of time, move each rep with a decreased amount of speed, and require more time & resources for the body/CNS to recover. When it comes to hormones, spending too much time in a fatigued state, especially when frequently going to failure, can lead to decreases in testosterone and increases in cortisol, which can negatively impact power production.


The graph below will illustrate my point. The explosively trained group produces a greater amount of force in less time, this is essential in sport, as most plays & movements occur in fractions of a second.


Sedentary vs. Explosively Trained vs. Excessively Strength Trained:




  • Grinding out rep after rep for too long can negatively impact the FORCE / TIME curve


The above paragraph is for people whose performance seems to be dropping or stagnating for far too long (~1 month). TSTP's have their place of course, they are good for general physical preparedness (GPP), hypertrophy, strength gain, etc. They can effectively be done in blocks or in conjunction with explosive training, but if done excessively and for too long, performance can suffer. So if that's your case, you might want to consider MSEM (this blog) or some other strategy (future blogs).


With MSEM, two sets of three (2 x 3) refers to:

- Set 1: Rep1, rest, Rep2, rest, Rep3
- recovery
- Set 2: Rep1, rest, Rep2, rest, Rep3
- recovery

Example MSEM Session by SpikeJon
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r9TWw5cycJU" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r9TWw5cycJU</a>

So, if we use the barbell squat in our MSEM example, this would require the barbell be re-racked after each rep, giving a brief amount of rest to shake out the legs, take deep breathes, and rid yourself of some tension. The rest you take between reps could be anywhere from 15 seconds to 1 minute.

MSEM Protocol as defined by Verkhoshansky

The two variants

  • Variant 1
    Parameters
    • Sets: 2-4
    • Reps: 2-3 (rest between reps)
    • Intensity: 90-95% 1RM
    • Rest between reps: 15s-1min
    • Rest between sets: 4-6 minutes
    • Frequency Off-season: 1 session every 2-3 weeks
    • Frequency In-season: 1 session every 1-2 weeks
  • Variant 2 - Much more intense:
    Parameters:
    • Sets: Wave loaded
    • Reps: 2-3 (rest between reps)
    • intensity:
      • Set 1: 90%
      • Set 2: 95%
      • Set 3: 100%
      • Set 4: 95%
      • Set 5: 100%
      • Set 6: Attempt PR
    • Rest between reps: 15s-1min
    • Rest between sets: 4-6 minutes
    • Frequency Off-season: 1 session every 2-3 weeks
    • Frequency In-season: 1 session every 1-2 weeks




  • MSEM is STIM, it help to PR on the field or in the weight room


I have seen success with those exact methods, and slight deviations. Instead of limiting it to 2-4 x 2-3, I've used just one set of 4-8 singles, increasing or decreasing weight by 5-10 lb. depending on how I feel after each single. When playing with MSEM, you will notice that sometimes the second and third reps feel more explosive than the first. This is a stimulatory effect, which can definitely be taken advantage of. Another stimulatory effect is seen in the performance of subsequent sets, such as the 2nd and 3rd. This is taken advantage of in Verkhoshansky's second variant.


I personally wouldn't use Variant 2 in-season for sports like basketball, tennis, baseball, football etc... Variant 2 lends itself more to track and field / weightlifting events, or sports with more time to recover in between events.


To implement MSEM, make sure you're in a strength or power block. Not a good idea to utilize MSEM sessions in a GPP block. If you're in a strength or power block, you could throw in a session once every 1-3 weeks, making sure to include adequate recovery time before AND after. For your next session following the MSEM session, test your vert or speed. Use a session like this to get rid of some fatigue, prime the nervous system, and test your performance a few days following. So, in general, start off throwing in an MSEM session once every 3 weeks, and as you get closer to trying to peak your vert utilize MSEM once every 2 weeks, then 1 week, then peak.

I've effectively used MSEM using the barbell squat for double leg jumpers, single leg jumpers, and sprinters.

Example sessions might be:

Session:
- (~8 minutes) warmup
- (~35 minutes) sprints / jumps / explosive stuff / something
- (~45 mins)
- barbell squat: MSEM: 2 x 3
OPTIONAL: db walking lunges: 2x5e (for people who love the unilaterals)
- core
- (~10 minutes)
- stretch


  • MSEM can be used by sprinters, double & single leg jumpers, weightlifters, or in-season strength maintenance/improvement


If you're a single leg jumper or sprinter, and would like to try using this method with more specificity, it's a little tough but the best way to do it would be to utilize 12" barbell stepups. Alot of experience with this lift is required before hitting 90-95%. I would stay clear of 100% lifts using 12" barbell stepups. You can perform the singles on both legs, one at a time, then rest. Otherwise, as purely a jumper, you could just perform MSEM on your dominant jumping leg, and then perform lighter reps after the session on your non-dominant leg.

Example sessions for advanced single leg jumper

Session:
- (~8 minutes) warmup
- (~35 minutes) sprints / jumps / explosive stuff / something
- (~45 mins)
- 12" barbell stepup: MSEM: 2 x 3
- core
- (~10 minutes)
- stretch




testing mpegstreamclip : MSEM half squat 315 x 9 @ 154 *AFTER* 2 hours of conditioning ::: adarq.org






WEAK DEPTH, msem half sq 325 @ 2x4 singles after 1 hour of fatiguing reactive work






MSEM EXAMPLE: 315 x 8 singles @ 154 lb Bodyweight. Maximal Strength Effort Method ::: adarq.org












An example progression, incorporating upper body, utilizing MSEM in weeks 9-12:

Ok, so for people who have no idea what i'm talking about, here's a general example 12 week program which illustrates how to phase in MSEM. It includes upper body work to give an idea of how to taper it.


GPP: Weeks 1-4
STRENGTH: Weeks 5-8
POWER: Weeks 9-12
PEAK: Week 13+
F: Failure
AF: Almost Failure
10e: 10 each
SL: Single Leg



Weeks 1 & 2:

Monday: Upper Body:
- (~5 minutes) warmup
- (~10-25 minutes) footwork / skill stuff / something
- (~3 minutes) shoulder prehab (prone Y T W)
- (~45 minutes)
- flat db bench (3x10) SUPERSET seated row (3x10)
- incline db bench (2x10) SUPERSET pullups (2xF)
- pushups (3xF) SUPERSET horizontal pullup (3xF)
- shoulder matrix (3x10) SUPERSET tricep pushdown (3x10)
- core
(~10 minutes)
- stretch


Tuesday: Lower Body:
- (~8 minutes) warmup
- (~25 minutes) sprints / jumps / something
- (~45 mins)
- barbell squat (3x10)
- db walking lunges: 3x10e
- 18" db stepup: 3x10e
- Double leg glute bridges: 3xF SUPERSET Standing double leg calf raise: 3x10
- core
- (~10 minutes)
- stretch


Thursday: Same as Monday


Saturday: Same as Tuesday




Weeks 3 & 4:

Monday: Upper Body:
- (~5 minutes) warmup
- (~10-25 minutes) footwork / skill stuff / something
- (~3 minutes) shoulder prehab (prone Y T W)
- (~45 minutes)
- flat db bench (3x8) SUPERSET seated row (3x8)
- incline db bench (2x8) SUPERSET pullups (2xF)
- pushups (3xF) SUPERSET horizontal pullup (3xF)
- shoulder matrix (3x10) SUPERSET tricep pushdown (3x10)
- core
(~10 minutes)
- stretch


Tuesday: Lower Body:
- (~8 minutes) warmup
- (~25 minutes) sprints / jumps / something
- (~45 mins)
- barbell squat (3x8)
- db walking lunges: 3x8e
- 18" db stepup: 3x8e
- Double leg glute bridges: 3xF SUPERSET Standing db calf raise: 3x8
- core
- (~10 minutes)
- stretch


Thursday: Same as Monday


Saturday: Same as Tuesday





Week 5 & 6:

Monday: Upper Body:
- (~5 minutes) warmup
- (~10-25 minutes) footwork / skill stuff / med ball throws
- (~3 minutes) shoulder prehab (prone Y T W)
- (~45 minutes)
- flat db bench: 3x8
- seated row: 3x8
- incline pushups (3xF) SUPERSET pullups (3xF)
- shoulder matrix (3x10) SUPERSET Tricep Pushdown (3xF)
- (~10 minutes)
- stretch


Tuesday: Lower Body:
- (~8 minutes) warmup
- (~35 minutes) sprints / jumps / something
- (~45 mins)
- barbell squat (4x8)
- walking lunges (4x8e)
- double leg glute bridges (3xF) SUPERSET standing calf raise: 3x8
- core
- (~10 minutes)
- stretch



Thursday: Upper Body:
- (~5 minutes) warmup
- (~10-25 minutes) footwork / skill stuff / med ball throws
- (~3 minutes) shoulder prehab (prone Y T W)
- (~45 minutes)
- flat db bench: 4x8
- single arm db row: 4x8
- flat pushups (3xF) SUPERSET horizontal pullups (3xF)
- shoulder matrix (3x10) SUPERSET Tricep Pushdown (3xF)
- (~10 minutes)
- stretch


Saturday: Lower Body:
- (~8 minutes) warmup
- (~35 minutes) sprints / jumps / something
- (~45 mins)
- barbell squat (3x8)
- 18" lunges (3x8e)
- single leg glute bridges (3xF) SUPERSET standing calf raise: 3x8
- core
- (~10 minutes)
- stretch





Week 7 & 8:

Monday: Upper Body:
- (~5 minutes) warmup
- (~10-25 minutes) footwork / skill stuff / med ball throws
- (~3 minutes) shoulder prehab (prone Y T W)
- (~45 minutes)
- flat db bench: 4x8
- seated row: 4x8
- weighted incline pushups (3xF) SUPERSET weighted pullups (3xF)
- shoulder matrix (3x10) SUPERSET Tricep Pushdown (3xF)
- (~10 minutes)
- stretch


Tuesday: Lower Body:
- (~8 minutes) warmup
- (~35 minutes) sprints / jumps / something
- (~45 mins)
- barbell squat (3x5)
- walking lunges (3x5e)
- double leg glute bridges (3xF) SUPERSET standing calf raise: 3x8
- core
- (~10 minutes)
- stretch



Thursday: Upper Body:
- (~5 minutes) warmup
- (~10-25 minutes) footwork / skill stuff / med ball throws
- (~3 minutes) shoulder prehab (prone Y T W)
- (~45 minutes)
- flat db bench: 4x8
- single arm db row row: 4x8
- weighted flat pushups (3xF) SUPERSET weighted horizontal pullups (3xF)
- shoulder matrix (3x10) SUPERSET Tricep Pushdown (3xF)
- (~10 minutes)
- stretch


Saturday: Lower Body:
- (~8 minutes) warmup
- (~35 minutes) sprints / jumps / something
- (~45 mins)
- barbell squat (3x5)
- 18" lunges (3x5e)
- single leg glute bridges (3xF) SUPERSET standing calf raise: 3x5
- core
- (~10 minutes)
- stretch



Week 9 & 10:

Monday: Upper Body:
- (~5 minutes) warmup
- (~10-25 minutes) footwork / skill stuff / med ball throws
- (~3 minutes) shoulder prehab (prone Y T W)
- (~45 minutes)
- flat db bench: 3x5
- seated row: 3x5
- weighted incline pushups (2xF) SUPERSET weighted pullups (2xF)
- weighted horizontal pullups (2xF)
- shoulder matrix (3x10) SUPERSET Tricep Pushdown (3xF)
- (~10 minutes)
- stretch


Tuesday: Lower Body
- (~8 minutes) warmup
- (~35 minutes) sprints / jumps / something
- (~45 mins)
- barbell squat: workup to a max 5 rep set (say 135x5, 185x5, 225x5, 245x5, 265x5)
- db walking lunges: 2x5
- db stepup: 2x5
- double leg glutes bridges: (3xF)
- single leg glute bridges: (2xF)
- core
- (~10 minutes)
- stretch



Thursday: Upper Body:
- (~5 minutes) warmup
- (~10-25 minutes) footwork / skill stuff / med ball throws
- (~3 minutes) shoulder prehab (prone Y T W)
- (~30 minutes)
- incline db bench: 3x5
- single arm db row: 3x5
- (~10 minutes)
- stretch



Saturday: Lower Body:
- (~8 minutes) warmup
- (~35 minutes) sprints / jumps / explosive stuff / something
- (~45 mins)
- barbell squat: MSEM: 2 x 3
- walking lunges: 3x5
- core
- (~10 minutes)
- stretch




Week 11:

Monday: Upper Body
- (~5 minutes) warmup
- (~10-25 minutes) footwork / skill stuff / med ball throws
- (~3 minutes) shoulder prehab (prone Y T W)
- (~45 minutes)
- flat db bench: 3x5
- seated row: 3x5
- weighted incline pushups (2xAF)
- weighted pullups (2xAF)
- weighted horizontal pullups (2xAF)
- shoulder matrix (3x10) SUPERSET Tricep Pushdown (3xAF)
- (~10 minutes)
- stretch



Wednesday: Lower Body:
- (~8 minutes) warmup
- (~35 minutes) sprints / jumps / explosive stuff / something
- (~45 mins)
- barbell squat: MSEM: 2 x 3
- core
- (~10 minutes)
- stretch


Friday: Upper Body
- (~5 minutes) warmup
- (~10-25 minutes) footwork / skill stuff / med ball throws
- (~3 minutes) shoulder prehab (prone Y T W)
- (~45 minutes)
- weighted incline pushups (2xAF)
- weighted pullups (2xAF)
- (~10 minutes)
- stretch



Week 12:

Monday: Lower Body
- (~8 minutes) warmup
- (~35 minutes) sprints / jumps / explosive stuff / something
- (~45 mins)
- barbell squat: MSEM: 2 x 3
- core
- (~10 minutes)
- stretch


Friday: Lower Body
- (~8 minutes) warmup
- (~35 minutes) sprints / jumps / something
- (~45 mins)
- barbell squat: MSEM: 2 x 3
- core
- (~10 minutes)
- stretch



Week 13: Peak


-- adarq

vag

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Re: Maximum Strength Effort Method
« Reply #1 on: February 05, 2010, 09:06:09 am »
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Awesome , epic , jizz in my pants!!!
woot


Joe

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Re: 02/05/2010: Maximum Strength Effort Method
« Reply #3 on: February 07, 2010, 02:25:04 pm »
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Me like.
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Kellyb

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Re: Maximum Strength Effort Method
« Reply #4 on: March 28, 2010, 09:09:25 pm »
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Nice article man. One interesting thing about that and a good example of how things sometimes get lost in translation is that's the original max effort method espoused by westside barbell, but I think most people interpret their version a bit differently. It can be tough when you read a bunch of different strength/performance texts because different researchers from different countries will often use different names and slightly different variations.  For example, the brief maximal tension method is much the same but I think you'll hear that from German researchers. I believe Bompa calls his the mxs method or something similar.

adarqui

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Re: Maximum Strength Effort Method
« Reply #5 on: March 28, 2010, 09:46:23 pm »
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Nice article man. One interesting thing about that and a good example of how things sometimes get lost in translation is that's the original max effort method espoused by westside barbell, but I think most people interpret their version a bit differently. It can be tough when you read a bunch of different strength/performance texts because different researchers from different countries will often use different names and slightly different variations.  For example, the brief maximal tension method is much the same but I think you'll hear that from German researchers. I believe Bompa calls his the mxs method or something similar.

thanks mang.

Well the main difference is the rest between resp. West side's max effort days include sets of singles, doubles, or triples. They mention their ME days are extremely fatiguing etc, but from what I've found, MSEM with rest between reps is hardly that. They don't generally psyche up on ME days, which is good, but the multi-rep lifting definitely takes it's toll and requires that 72 hour recovery.

From what I see on sites/youtube, their ME method has become radically different. People want to rep shit out too. The thought of only performing singles with rest in between reps, would leave most people completely baffled. So ya, it's no wonder their ME days have changed so much. Also, they have hundreds of variations for their ME lifts. As far as performance goes, I don't see that as being a good thing. I don't even know where they got that? Accommodation can certainly happen, but there's just way too many variations of shit.

One thing I always found funny, is that WSB guys consider box jumps as shock. Well, they list it as a form of shock training. That is the furthest thing from shock that I can even think of.

Have you ever noticed that?

Louie makes some pretty funny claims, sometimes I wonder if he's a serial exaggerator. He has helped a ton of people out so I'm not trashing him, but some of the "performance" stories he mentions to promote his system, just seem unfounded.

pc man

Kellyb

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Re: Maximum Strength Effort Method
« Reply #6 on: March 29, 2010, 02:26:09 pm »
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It's been a while since I've looked into any westside stuff I just think it's funny how so many things get oddly translated. The "conjugate method" is another one.  I'm sure there are others.

As for the pauses, I can kinda see why they wouldn't want to pause reps.  When you get really strong one of the hardest things is just unracking and walking out the bar plus all that equipment makes it even more difficult.

On another note, I also think the psych thing is something that contributes the most to the variabiilty in how fatiguing some people feel low rep lower body training...especially high load/high frequency training.   I've noticed (and I remember Glenn Pendlay saying this too) that people that have a big gap between training and competitive max will burn themselves out very easily if they're not careful because they tend to get too adrenalized. I 've had some guys who can't succeed with even low volume high frequency training because they burn theirselves out. I suspect a big reason is they just naturally run in high adrenaline mode all the time.  Westside guys usually train in "packs" that promotes a competitive high adrenaline atmosphere, so even if they're not supposed to be getting fired up, they do.  I used to do westside with a group of guys for  a while in the late 90's. We'd work up to a max and try for PRs once per week. I rmember it being extremely fatiguing after a while.

But anyway, for some guys I started using a built in buffer to prevent that. For example, instead of 5 x 1 @90-100% I'll restrict them to nothing more than 85% with specific directions to stay relaxed.  Or I'll say something like, "Use perfect form and use a weight you could do 5 reps if you absolutely had to." The buffers are especially something I use the stronger a person gets.  In my experience 90% for a 400 lb squatter will be considerably different than 90% for a 200 lb squatter.

AlexV

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Re: Maximum Strength Effort Method
« Reply #7 on: March 29, 2010, 05:19:26 pm »
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It's been a while since I've looked into any westside stuff I just think it's funny how so many things get oddly translated. The "conjugate method" is another one.  I'm sure there are others.

As for the pauses, I can kinda see why they wouldn't want to pause reps.  When you get really strong one of the hardest things is just unracking and walking out the bar plus all that equipment makes it even more difficult.

On another note, I also think the psych thing is something that contributes the most to the variabiilty in how fatiguing some people feel low rep lower body training...especially high load/high frequency training.   I've noticed (and I remember Glenn Pendlay saying this too) that people that have a big gap between training and competitive max will burn themselves out very easily if they're not careful because they tend to get too adrenalized. I 've had some guys who can't succeed with even low volume high frequency training because they burn theirselves out. I suspect a big reason is they just naturally run in high adrenaline mode all the time.  Westside guys usually train in "packs" that promotes a competitive high adrenaline atmosphere, so even if they're not supposed to be getting fired up, they do.  I used to do westside with a group of guys for  a while in the late 90's. We'd work up to a max and try for PRs once per week. I rmember it being extremely fatiguing after a while.

But anyway, for some guys I started using a built in buffer to prevent that. For example, instead of 5 x 1 @90-100% I'll restrict them to nothing more than 85% with specific directions to stay relaxed.  Or I'll say something like, "Use perfect form and use a weight you could do 5 reps if you absolutely had to." The buffers are especially something I use the stronger a person gets.  In my experience 90% for a 400 lb squatter will be considerably different than 90% for a 200 lb squatter.

I always like the AREG clusters ala CT for ME work.  so pick like 85-90% and do 1 rep, rest 10-30 sec, and keep doing singles until you slow down.  Very simple and when training alone easy to regulate.   It works kinda like a buffer esp since you stop when you gen noticeably slower.
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steven-miller

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Re: Maximum Strength Effort Method
« Reply #8 on: May 23, 2010, 08:15:37 am »
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Variant 2 from Verkoshansky is pretty interesting since it involves regular PR testing and allows to monitor strength increases pretty well for an intermediate lifter. However what puzzles me is that you are supposed to do 2-3 reps at 100%1rm, albeit with ~15s-60s rest in between. I would still think that this would kill me and I suppose that I would fail the second rep. Do I misinterpret the recommendations? Is 100% meant as 100% of a 2rm or 3rm?


adarqui

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Re: Maximum Strength Effort Method
« Reply #9 on: May 23, 2010, 08:21:22 pm »
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Variant 2 from Verkoshansky is pretty interesting since it involves regular PR testing and allows to monitor strength increases pretty well for an intermediate lifter. However what puzzles me is that you are supposed to do 2-3 reps at 100%1rm, albeit with ~15s-60s rest in between. I would still think that this would kill me and I suppose that I would fail the second rep. Do I misinterpret the recommendations? Is 100% meant as 100% of a 2rm or 3rm?



Yea, those are Verkhoshansky's EXACT recommendations, of which I have come to my own conclusion. I feel the 100% 1RM lifts in variant 2 are "100% non-psyche up", which would be less than a psyched up pure maximum attempt. Also, I feel that people who utilize this technique adapt in a way in which 100% non-psyche up singles can be attempted with short rest: the body learns another single is coming, the tonic effect of the first single carries over to the second etc. With Variant 2, I would imagine only 2 reps or so could really be performed at 100%. During the second set, that tonic effect (stim) usually carries over quite well and you do feel a bit stronger, which can explain the 105% 1RM guidelines etc..

I definitely would use Variant 1 most often, or variations of variant 1.

Some of my own variations of variant 1 include a much higher volume and slightly lower intensity of singles than is prescribed. Rip is about to start utilizing that during his maintenance phase in June.

I hope that helps, I'd have to ask the man himself for his exact reasoning on his great forum. I have been meaning to post on his forum about my experience with MSEM like I did with my post about shock way back. MSEM hardly receives any attention, even by himself in his online documents, which is funny because I think it is the most powerful method I have utilized. His shock method is extremely effective but VERY intense, so it's not something you can easily recommend over the internet, MSEM however, easily prescribed. It seems everyone who starts utilizing MSEM protocols gets great results from it very quickly, I'm glad more people are experimenting with it, one thing I've noticed is that everyone who has experimented with it has kept it in their programming to some extent, so it definitely is showing results.

peace man

steven-miller

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Re: Maximum Strength Effort Method
« Reply #10 on: May 24, 2010, 08:27:32 am »
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Would that be a reasonable variant to do? I think it is close to Verkoshansky's recommendations for variant 1, but with a regular PR attempt.

Squat

Set 1: 2 paused reps at 90%1rm
Set 2: 2 paused reps at 90-95%1rm
Set 3: 2 paused reps at 95%1rm
Set 4: 1 repetition; PR attempt

1rm would be determined by the weight done during the 4th set of the last MSEM session (but only if the lift was successful).

Also in a session like that, should additional lifts be added if one would be in a power block? I would have thought that power snatches might work well after the squats and for most lifters they won't add much fatigue due to the relatively low weights. Then maybe one upperbody lift for maintenance and that's it.

Thanks for your thoughts!
« Last Edit: May 24, 2010, 08:29:04 am by steven-miller »

adarqui

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Re: Maximum Strength Effort Method
« Reply #11 on: May 24, 2010, 09:31:35 pm »
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Would that be a reasonable variant to do? I think it is close to Verkoshansky's recommendations for variant 1, but with a regular PR attempt.

ya it definitely would be, but i would use it much less than variant 1, for sure.. maybe in a 4:1 ratio of variant-1 to variant-2, for example.

Quote
Squat

Set 1: 2 paused reps at 90%1rm
Set 2: 2 paused reps at 90-95%1rm
Set 3: 2 paused reps at 95%1rm
Set 4: 1 repetition; PR attempt

1rm would be determined by the weight done during the 4th set of the last MSEM session (but only if the lift was successful).

Also in a session like that, should additional lifts be added if one would be in a power block? I would have thought that power snatches might work well after the squats and for most lifters they won't add much fatigue due to the relatively low weights. Then maybe one upperbody lift for maintenance and that's it.

Thanks for your thoughts!


ya that looks good, I wouldn't try to set a new 1RM (or test 1RM) though every session.. using these little variants you will easily know when to push it, for example, during the work up sets, the weight will be just flying up compared to normal, so ya, it's PR time then.

additional lifts can definitely be done.. power exercises such as REA squat/depth jump I would advise doing prior to the MSEM squat session. Jump squat and power snatch etc can also be done before, but those could also be done after. REA squat/depth jump help improve squat session imo, thats why i pretty much restrict them to being placed before MSEM squatting..

Here are some lifts/exercises you could do after MSEM squatting:

potentiated exercises:
- sprints
- med ball throws
- broad jumps / SVJ's
- RFI
- power snatch, clean pulls, jump squat

other work:
- low volume upper body lifting OR regular volume bodyweight stuff
- assistance lower body exercises such as walking lunges etc
- core

I wouldn't do too much though on these stim days, just stick to something like:

- WARMUP
- REA and/or DJ's
- MSEM squat
- 1-2 potentiation exercise OR quick upper body stuff OR lower body assistance
- CORE
- LIGHT STRETCH
done.

I don't really like doing RVJ's after heavy squatting so I never advise it, too risky for knee tendonitis issues IMO.


peace man!

steven-miller

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Re: Maximum Strength Effort Method
« Reply #12 on: May 24, 2010, 09:55:42 pm »
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Hey adarqui,

thanks for your thoughts again. I will let the information sink in a bit but thanks to you I already have a general idea about how the next block will have to be designed.

One question came up regarding this:


ya it definitely would be, but i would use it much less than variant 1, for sure.. maybe in a 4:1 ratio of variant-1 to variant-2, for example.


Why do you think that the variant I posted needs to be done in a less frequent manner? The only difference I see is the fourth set with a heavy single. Do you think that this would have such a dramatic effect on fatigue?

adarqui

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Re: Maximum Strength Effort Method
« Reply #13 on: May 24, 2010, 10:02:06 pm »
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Hey adarqui,

thanks for your thoughts again. I will let the information sink in a bit but thanks to you I already have a general idea about how the next block will have to be designed.

One question came up regarding this:


ya it definitely would be, but i would use it much less than variant 1, for sure.. maybe in a 4:1 ratio of variant-1 to variant-2, for example.


Why do you think that the variant I posted needs to be done in a less frequent manner? The only difference I see is the fourth set with a heavy single. Do you think that this would have such a dramatic effect on fatigue?


well I just don't think you should try and PR your MAX 1RM *every* MSEM session, but that's because I like to rotate things and PR in other aspects like volume etc, for example:

session 1: MSEM var 1: 2 x 2 with 95%
session 2: MSEM var 1: 2 x 3 with 95%
session 3: MSEM var 2: ... obtain PR
session 4: MSEM var 1: 2 x 2 with 95% (of new PR)
session 5: MSEM var 1: 2 x 3 with 95% (of new PR)
session 6: MSEM var 2: ....

so you see there, that's how I like to rotate through, trying to "PR" added volume and then PR max strength 1RM.

hope that clarifies what I meant, cya!

steven-miller

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Re: Maximum Strength Effort Method
« Reply #14 on: May 25, 2010, 07:52:22 am »
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well I just don't think you should try and PR your MAX 1RM *every* MSEM session, but that's because I like to rotate things and PR in other aspects like volume etc, for example:

session 1: MSEM var 1: 2 x 2 with 95%
session 2: MSEM var 1: 2 x 3 with 95%
session 3: MSEM var 2: ... obtain PR
session 4: MSEM var 1: 2 x 2 with 95% (of new PR)
session 5: MSEM var 1: 2 x 3 with 95% (of new PR)
session 6: MSEM var 2: ....

so you see there, that's how I like to rotate through, trying to "PR" added volume and then PR max strength 1RM.

hope that clarifies what I meant, cya!

This looks like a clever approach. Will it work however if I only have one MSEM session every 10 days? I am not even sure if my gains in the VJ will last 60 days after my strength block, I would think they don't but I don't have any experience with that situation...