Author Topic: The Single Leg Jumper's Toolbox: Part 1, 2, & 3  (Read 20774 times)

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The Single Leg Jumper's Toolbox: Part 1, 2, & 3
« on: February 21, 2010, 08:16:10 am »
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02/11/2010: Single Leg Jumper's Toolbox: Part 1, 2, & 3

By: Andrew Darqui


 

eddie-jump-sideview_00003 eddie-jump-sideview_00005 eddie-jump-sideview_00008 eddie-jump-sideview_00009 eddie-jump-sideview_00011 eddie-jump-sideview_00012 eddie-jump-sideview_00014 eddie-jump-sideview_00015 eddie-jump-sideview_00017 eddie-jump-sideview_00018 eddie-jump-sideview_00020 eddie-jump-sideview_00023 eddie-jump-sideview_00024 eddie-jump-sideview_00026





INTRO

Ever so often, the topic of increasing single leg running vertical jumping (SLRVJ) ability comes up. The advice given by others seems to lean towards plyometric dominated routines, with less emphasis given to weightlifting. To me, this overemphasis on "plyometric" training is just the typical useless strength & conditioning regurgitation. On the same note, if I see another person recommend smolov or starting strength to someone who wants to improve single leg jumping, my brain is going to implode.

In this 3-part article, I will provide a framework for improving single leg running vertical jump. In part 1, I'm just going to outline what exercises are important depending on your experience level. Part 2 will provide general details on each exercise. Part 3 will provide various routines & training ideologies.

Stay tuned for part 4, because I will provide actual templates for those who have problems following this huge article. However, there should be no problem following this article. :) The templates will include general program layouts for beginner/intermediate/and advanced athletes.

Show-N-Improve: Eddie flying
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T-zLl_IlNcY" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T-zLl_IlNcY</a>


PART 1: OVERVIEW

SLRVJ performance gains depend on a few things:
  • Improving efficiency with SLRVJ itself
  • Improving muscular strength in the ankles, calves, quads, glutes, and hamstrings
  • Improving the ability to overload various movements that transfer to SLRVJ (for example: bounds or heavy stepups)
  • Improving core strength, especially with stabilization exercises (core plank variations)
  • Improving arm swing by increasing shoulder power
  • Improving body composition
  • Experiencing the most significant gains in periods of high intensity and low volume training (re: peaking @ this blog entry)


Want SLRVJ, but can't bound? Master it.

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lM-IndBayWA" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lM-IndBayWA</a>



Training for single leg jumping depends on a few things:

SLRVJ Movement Efficiency:
  • Poor (LEVEL-1)
  • Good (LEVEL-2)
  • Advanced (LEVEL-3)


Weight Training Experience Level:
  • Beginner
  • Intermediate
  • Advanced


As usual in performance enhancement, training will depend on which categories you fall into.




PART 1(A): SLRVJ Movement Efficiency

Movement efficiency refers to how coordinated a movement is, particularly SLRVJ in this case. Explosive/reactive training will be guided depending on the level of movement efficiency. For example, performing truly plyometric movements with poor movement efficiency is risky and ineffective.

Judging SLRVJ movement efficiency is more of a "does it look good" approach. Bounding tests & SLRVJ jump height could be used to place an individual into a certain category, but this can fail in the case where someone has great movement efficiency yet lacks a decent amount of strength (basketball player example). So for that reason, I will use other observations to categorize SLRVJ movement efficiency.

Poor (LEVEL-1)
  • Little to no experience with SLRVJ's
  • Joints collapsing during plant & takeoff, for example; ankle, knee, or hip collapse
  • Plant, arm swing, and takeoff do not look fluid (one motion)
  • Unable to accelerate aggressively into a 3-step jump, without getting too much horizontal displacement. Jump angle <= 60-65 degrees.


Good (LEVEL-2)
  • Moderate to great experience with SLRVJ's
  • No obvious collapsing at the joints during plant & takeoff
  • Plant, arm swing, and takeoff look fluid
  • Able to accelerate aggressively into a 3-step jump, without getting too much horizontal displacement. Jump angle > 60-65 degrees.
  • Unable to accelerate aggressively into a 5-step jump, without getting too much horizontal displacement. Jump angle <= 60-65 degrees.
  • Unable to proficiently perform single leg bounding


Advanced (LEVEL-3)
  • Great experience with SLRVJ's
  • No obvious collapsing at the joints during plant & takeoff
  • Plant, arm swing, and take off are very fluid
  • Able to accelerate aggressively into a 5-step jump, without getting too much horizontal displacement. Jump angle > 60-65 degrees.
  • Proficiency in single leg bounding


Now that you know where you stand movement-efficiency wise, you don't have to spend your time with exercises that are too far above or below your experience level.


Explosive exercises for SLRVJ based on movement efficiency level

Explosive exercises for LEVEL-1

- Should not perform exercises in the LEVEL-2 or LEVEL-3 brackets before progressing properly.

- Athletes in this bracket should ONLY do these exercises.

PRIMARY EXERCISES:
  • Single leg running vertical jumps should make up the majority of your explosive training
  • SLRVJ's from 1 step, 2 step, 3 step, and 'normal' (how you normally do them). Emphasizing 60-65 degree takeoff angle (vertical emphasis).


SECONDARY EXERCISES:
  • Power skips


ASSISTANCE EXERCISES:
  • [Force absorption]: Paused quick lunges
  • [Force absorption]: Paused single leg lateral jumps
  • [Reactivity]: Quick lunges


ANKLE ASSISTANCE EXERCISES:
  • [Reactivity]: Double leg RFI line hops (lateral, linear)
  • [Reactivity]: Double leg lateral barrier jumps (rebounding). An imaginary barrier could be used. Optimally, the barrier would be a hurdle with a rope on top. Boxes or actual hurdles can lead to injury.


Explosive exercises for LEVEL-2

- Athletes in this bracket can perform exercises / progressions from the LEVEL-1 bracket, but should not perform LEVEL-3 exercises without proper progression.

- Bounding should be progressed slowly, over a period of months in most cases, emphasizing knee drive and a cyclic motion of the heel under the butt in a sprint-like motion. If you aren't experienced with bounding, it's essential to start off slow and work on proper arm drive / hip drive / leg turnover. Hurdles with ropes are one of the best tools for teaching single leg bounding, as you are forced to drive the hip up and cycle the leg over the rope.

PRIMARY EXERCISES:
  • SLRVJ's from 5 steps and normal. Emphasizing 60-65 degree takeoff angle (vertical emphasis).


SECONDARY EXERCISES:
  • [Force absorption + Reactivity]: Alternate leg bounding progression (LRLR...).
  • [Force absorption + Reactivity]: Single leg bounding progression (LLRR, LLLRRR, LLLL..., RRRRR...)


ASSISTANCE EXERCISES:
  • [Force absorption]: Vertical Jump to split squat landings
  • [Reactivity]: Weighted quick lunges
  • [Explosive strength]: Single leg box jumps / hurdle jumps (single response)


ANKLE ASSISTANCE EXERCISES:
  • [Reactivity]: Single leg RFI line hops (lateral, linear, multi-directional)
  • [Reactivity]: Weighted single leg RFI line hops (lateral, linear, multi-directional)
  • [Reactivity]: LOW-ROPE Single leg lateral barrier jumps (rebounding). An Imaginary barrier could be used. Optimally, the barrier would be a hurdle with a rope on top. Boxes or actual hurdles can lead to injury.



Explosive exercises for LEVEL-3

- Athletes in this bracket can do any exercise (LEVEL-1, LEVEL-2 & LEVEL-3 brackets).

PRIMARY EXERCISES:
  • SLRVJ's from 5 steps and normal. Emphasizing 60-65 degree takeoff angle (vertical emphasis).


SECONDARY EXERCISES:
  • [Force absorption + Reactivity]: Max effort alternate leg bounds (LRLR...)
  • [Force absorption + Reactivity]: Max effort single leg bounds (LLRR, LLLRRR, LLL...., RRRRR...)
  • [Force absorption + Reactivity]: Max effort weighted single leg bounds


ASSISTANCE EXERCISES:
  • [Force absorption]: ADA split squat landings
  • [Force absorption + Reactivity]: Single leg box jumps (multi response)
  • [Explosive strength]: Explosive weighted rebounding lunge jumps
  • [Reactivity]: Single leg lateral barrier jumps (rebounding). An imaginary barrier can be used. Optimally, the barrier would be a hurdle with a rope on top. Boxes or actual hurdles can lead to injury.



Med ball throws
  • Can be used by any experience level
  • Consists of overhead throw, scoop toss, scoop throws, etc.





PART 1(B): Weight Training Experience Level

As far as weight training exercises go, you won't really find anything fancy in this section. Instead, you'll find simple weight training exercises that transfer very well to single leg jumping, that is, they strengthen the muscles & movements involved in SLRVJ's. Although bilateral strength exercises are very important to single leg jumpers, the primary emphasis should be on improving strength using unilateral exercises.

Quick note about olympic lifts: Olympic lifts (snatch, clean & jerk) and their assistance lifts (power clean, power snatch, hang clean, hang snatch) can be very effective at improving explosive strength. However, it is not something I recommend, because these lifts usually need quite a bit of coaching. It is rare to find people who are self taught in the oly's (olympic lifts) who have proper technique. Performing oly's with crap form is just a waste of time, their are safer & more effective alternatives. If you are proficient with oly's, feel free to add them to the list of exercises in the PRIMARY ASSISTANCE category.

Strength Exercises: Beginner

MAIN EXERCISES:
  • DB Walking Lunges
  • DB 18" Stepups


PRIMARY ASSISTANCE EXERCISES:
  • BB Squat


SECONDARY ASSISTANCE EXERCISES:
  • Single & Double leg glute bridges
  • Reverse hypers
  • Peterson stepups
  • Calf raises


Strength Exercises: Intermediate

MAIN EXERCISES:
  • BB/DB Walking Lunges
  • BB Squat
  • DB 18" Stepups


PRIMARY ASSISTANCE EXERCISES:
  • DB 24" Stepups
  • GHR Bench or Poor Man's GHR's
  • REA Squat


SECONDARY ASSISTANCE EXERCISES:
  • SL elevated glute bridges
  • Calf raises


Strength Exercises: Advanced

MAIN EXERCISES:
  • BB Walking Lunges
  • BB 1/2 - 1/4 Squat
  • BB 12" Stepups


ASSISTANCE EXERCISES:
  • ANYTHING FROM INTERMEDIATE/BEGINNER ASSISTANCE



General Upperbody Exercises:

- This can either be extensive or very minimal. At the very least, a few bodyweight exercises should be performed, adding weight, sets, or reps as you progress. Listed below are two types of exercises: push & pull. Using just these exercises, significant strength can be gained without the need for more advanced dumbell and barbell exercises. The only requirement is that, eventually intensity be added to the bodyweight exercises.

  • Variations of pullups and Chinups
  • Variations of pushups and dips






PART 1(C): SLRVJ Technique

I rarely teach form on VJ, SLRVJ, or DLRVJ. Instead, I believe that improving strength will naturally improve form. Strength is improved by progressing the movement efficiency exercises & the weightlifting exercises. For example, one may coach you to change your SLRVJ form in a certain way. For the most part, in order for this new form to be utilized, a huge amount of sub-maximal reps must be performed. In the end, this new form may or may not result in improved performance. Consciously changing your form during a maximal SLRVJ is impossible, because for it to be a maximal attempt, there can't exist conscious interference in such a high speed movement. Instead, you want everything to be pre-programmed & reflexive.

Strengthening the correct muscle groups, strengthening positions, mastering new movements, and continuing to jump maximally will lead to improved form. For example, improving strength may allow you to aggressively run up from a 5 step approach, as opposed to a 3 step approach. This new strength may also allow you to plant your leg further out, or further back. Regardless of what adaptations your body makes, they will be none other than positive if you progress the movement efficiency exercises & strength exercises.
 
I'll use eddie as an example. Some High Jump coaches may advise him to plant his foot further back. When eddie first started training, his foot did plant further back. As he got stronger, his best jumps came when he planted his leg way out in front of his body. His body just adjusted, and thus was able to handle a new and improved position that resulted to inches gained on his SLRVJ. The only thing that was conscious, was aggressively accelerating into the run up and powerful armswing, but these were cues we used pre-jump.

Below are 3 jumps from eddie. Click the thumbnails underneath the pictures to see how long his lead-in step is, where he plants his foot, etc. By no means try and consciously change your form. Eddie improved his strength immensely, through consistent hard work. The slight changes in his SLRVJ happened naturally as a result of increased strength.

 

dunk-1-slowmo_00000 dunk-1-slowmo_00001 dunk-1-slowmo_00002 dunk-1-slowmo_00003 dunk-1-slowmo_00004 dunk-1-slowmo_00005 dunk-1-slowmo_00006 dunk-1-slowmo_00007 dunk-1-slowmo_00008 dunk-1-slowmo_00013 dunk-1-slowmo_00017 dunk-1-slowmo_00021 dunk-1-slowmo_00025 dunk-1-slowmo_00072 dunk-1-slowmo_00076





eddie-137p5-vertec_00001 eddie-137p5-vertec_00003 eddie-137p5-vertec_00004 eddie-137p5-vertec_00006 eddie-137p5-vertec_00007 eddie-137p5-vertec_00009 eddie-137p5-vertec_00011 eddie-137p5-vertec_00012 eddie-137p5-vertec_00014 eddie-137p5-vertec_00016 eddie-137p5-vertec_00017 eddie-137p5-vertec_00018 eddie-137p5-vertec_00020 eddie-137p5-vertec_00021 eddie-137p5-vertec_00022 eddie-137p5-vertec_00026






eddie-138-dunk_00000 eddie-138-dunk_00001 eddie-138-dunk_00002 eddie-138-dunk_00003 eddie-138-dunk_00004 eddie-138-dunk_00005 eddie-138-dunk_00006 eddie-138-dunk_00007 eddie-138-dunk_00008 eddie-138-dunk_00009 eddie-138-dunk_00010 eddie-138-dunk_00011 eddie-138-dunk_00012 eddie-138-dunk_00013 eddie-138-dunk_00014 eddie-138-dunk_00015 eddie-138-dunk_00016 eddie-138-dunk_00017 eddie-138-dunk_00018 eddie-138-dunk_00019 eddie-138-dunk_00020 eddie-138-dunk_00021 eddie-138-dunk_00022 eddie-138-dunk_00024







PART 2: EXERCISES

Below are some links to the exercises listed. Some are not listed, because I have deleted some of my old footage. I'll try to get everything linked eventually. I can't be arsed listing out the "rep ranges" for each exercise, because they depend on the block, athlete, goal, etc. To spare my sanity, if you have a question about an exercise, post it.

MOVEMENT EFFICIENCY EXERCISES

Explosive exercises for POOR (LEVEL-1) movement efficiency

  1. PRIMARY EXERCISES
    Single leg running vertical jumps (SLRVJ's)
  2. SECONDARY EXERCISES
    Power Skips
  3. ASSISTANCE EXERCISES
    Paused quick lunges
    Paused single leg lateral jumps
    Quick lunges (rebounding)
  4. ANKLE ASSISTANCE EXERCISES
    Double leg RFI line hops (lateral, linear)  Another-angle
    Double leg lateral barrier jumps (rebounding). *CAUTION*



Explosive exercises for GOOD (LEVEL-2) movement efficiency

  1. PRIMARY EXERCISES
    SLRVJ's from 5 steps and normal. Emphasizing 60-65 degree takeoff angle (vertical emphasis).
  2. SECONDARY EXERCISES
    Alternate leg bounding progression (LRLR...)
    Single leg bounding progression (LLRR, LLLRRR, LLLL..., RRRRR...)
  3. ASSISTANCE EXERCISES
    Vertical Jump to split squat landings
    Weighted quick lunges
    Single leg box jumps / hurdle jumps (single response)
  4. ANKLE ASSISTANCE EXERCISES
    Single leg RFI line hops (lateral, linear, multi-directional)
    Weighted single leg RFI line hops (lateral, linear, multi-directional)
    Single leg lateral barrier jumps (rebounding). *CAUTION*





Explosive exercises for ADVANCED (LEVEL-3) movement efficiency

  1. PRIMARY EXERCISES
    SLRVJ's from 5 steps and normal. Emphasizing 60-65 degree takeoff angle (vertical emphasis).
  2. SECONDARY EXERCISES
    Max effort alternate leg bounds (LRLR...)
    Max effort single leg bounds (LLRR, LLLRRR, LLL...., RRRRR...) : #1 #2
    Max effort weighted single leg bounds
  3. ASSISTANCE EXERCISES
    Paused quick lunges
    ADA split squat landings
    Single leg box jumps (multi response)
    Explosive weighted rebounding lunge jumps



STRENGTH EXERCISES

Strength exercises for BEGINNER

  1. MAIN EXERCISES
    DB Walking Lunges
    DB 18 inch Stepups
  2. PRIMARY ASSISTANCE EXERCISES
    Half squat here
    BB Squat
  3. SECONDARY ASSISTANCE EXERCISES
    Single Leg Glute Bridge
    Double Leg Glute Bridge
    Reverse Hypers
    Peterson Stepup #2
    Calf Raises






Strength exercises for INTERMEDIATE

  1. MAIN EXERCISES
    BB/DB Walking Lunges
    BB Squat
    DB 18 inch Stepups
  2. PRIMARY ASSISTANCE EXERCISES
    DB 24 inch Stepups
    Glute Ham Bench OR Poor Man's GHR's
    REA Squat
  3. SECONDARY ASSISTANCE EXERCISES
    SL elevated glute bridges
    DB or BB Calf Raises






Strength exercises for ADVANCED

  1. MAIN EXERCISES
    BB Walking Lunge
    BB Half Squat OR BB Quarter Squat
    BB 12 inch Stepup
  2. ASSISTANCE EXERCISES
    ANYTHING FROM INTERMEDIATE/BEGINNER ASSISTANCE
















PART 3: TRAINING

Organizing Training
There's a few ways I like to organize training for SLRVJ:

Emphasis on primary movement efficiency exercise WITH strength training:

  • Warmup
  • movement efficiency exercise: PRIMARY MAIN: 1 exercise: Build up into max effort SLRVJ's until drop off
  • OPTIONAL: med ball throws
  • movement efficiency exercise: PRIMARY ASSISTANCE: 1 exercise
  • movement efficiency exercise: ANKLE ASSISTANCE: 1 exercise
  • max strength exercise: MAIN: 1 exercise
  • assistance exercise: PRIMARY ASSISTANCE: 1 exercise
  • assistance exercise: SECONDARY ASSISTANCE: 1-3 exercises, done quickly
  • Core


Emphasis on secondary movement efficiency exercise WITH strength training:

  • Warmup
  • movement efficiency exercise: SECONDARY MAIN: 1 exercises: bounds / skips
  • OPTIONAL: med ball throws
  • movement efficiency exercise: PRIMARY ASSISTANCE: 1 exercise
  • movement efficiency exercise: ANKLE ASSISTANCE: 1 exercise
  • max strength exercise: MAIN: 1 exercise
  • assistance exercise: PRIMARY ASSISTANCE: 1 exercise
  • assistance exercise: SECONDARY ASSISTANCE: 1-3 exercises, done quickly
  • Core


Emphasis on strength training WITH (primary or secondary) movement efficiency exercise:

  • Warmup
  • OPTIONAL: med ball throws
  • movement efficiency exercise: PRIMARY MAIN OR SECONDARY MAIN: 1 exercise: SLRVJ's or bounds / skips
  • movement efficiency exercise: ANKLE ASSISTANCE: 1 exercise
  • max strength exercise: MAIN: 1-2 exercise
  • assistance exercise: PRIMARY ASSISTANCE: 1-2 exercise
  • assistance exercise: SECONDARY ASSISTANCE: 1-3 exercises, done quickly
  • Core



Emphasis on movement efficiency exercises:

  • Warmup
  • movement efficiency exercise: PRIMARY MAIN OR SECONDARY MAIN: 1 exercise: SLRVJ's or bounds / skips
  • movement efficiency exercise: PRIMARY ASSISTANCE: 1 exercise
  • movement efficiency exercise: ANKLE ASSISTANCE: 1 exercise
  • OPTIONAL: med ball throws
  • OPTIONAL: core



Emphasis on Next-session STIM (advanced weight training experience):

  • Warmup
  • movement efficiency exercise: PRIMARY MAIN OR SECONDARY MAIN: 1 exercise: SLRVJ's or bounds / skips
  • max strength exercise: MAIN: USING MSEM APPROACH: 1 exercise
  • OPTIONAL: med ball throws
  • OPTIONAL: core




Emphasis on Per-session STIM (advanced weight training experience):

  • Warmup
  • movement efficiency exercise: PRIMARY MAIN: 1 exercise: SLRVJ's
  • STIM COMPLEX (described below)
  • OPTIONAL: core





The focus of training

Since the concepts of my Progressive Overload blog entry apply here, I won't go into too much detail.

Training for SLRVJ should be split up into 2 phases:
  • Building work capacity
  • Peaking


In the first phase, work capacity is built. This requires exposing the body to progressively higher volumes of training. These phases should be performed in the off-season, where skill work can suffer from the fatigue caused by this phase. Though skill work may suffer, it would not be a good idea to neglect it. Doing so will make transitioning into peaking much less effective.

Finally, a peaking phase is performed. Volume is gradually reduced, while intensity progressively increases. Here, frequency of training becomes important. Whether frequency is increased or decreased depends on the athlete, but the goal of doing so remains the same: To enhance CNS stimulation, reduce fatigue, perform jumps & plyos at the highest level, increase maximal strength, and increase explosive strength.
 


Training Blocks

Here are a few scenarios based on weightlifting experience:

Beginner Weight Training:
  • Acquisition phase: 8 weeks, 3-4 sets of 8-12 reps, ~2-3 sessions per week
  • Strength phase: 4 weeks, 3 sets of 6 reps, ~2-3 sessions per week
  • Power phase: 4 weeks, 2 sets of 6 reps, ~1-2 sessions per week


Intermediate / Advanced Weight Training:
  • Building work capacity phase: 4-8 weeks, 3-4 sets of 8-12 reps, ~3 sessions per week
  • Strength phase: 4-8 weeks, 3-4 sets of 5 reps, ~2-3 sessions per week
  • Power phase: 4 weeks, 3-4 sets of 1-3 reps, ~2-3 sessions per week


Intermediate / Advanced Weight Training, Using ratios: [hypertrophy:strength:MSEM] x N-ROTATIONS
  • Building work capacity phase: [3:1:1] x 3
  • Transition: [2:1:1] x 3
  • Neutral: [1:1:1] x 2
  • Power block: [1:2:1] x 3
  • Peaking: [0:1:3] x 2


I'm not going to go into much more detail on program structure, because honestly, there's too many factors to take into account, such as work schedule, recovery, stressors, sports, etc. These were just some general examples.



Mixing double & single leg jumping

When it comes to the movement efficiency portion of the SLRVJ workout, it's not a good idea to perform intense double leg jumps prior to max effort SLRVJ's. For example, in a SLRVJ session, preceding SLRVJ's with double leg RVJ's, double leg bounds, or double leg depth jumps can cause the SLRVJ's to suffer - the CNS can go haywire.

If the emphasis is on single leg RVJ's (PRIMARY) or bound variations (SECONDARY):
  • Don't precede SLRVJ training with max effort double leg movements (jumps or plyometrics)


If the emphasis is on double leg RVJ' (DLRVJ's):
  • Don't precede DLRVJ training with max effort SLRVJ's.
  • Variations of single leg bounding can be performed prior to DLRVJ's.


If the emphasis is on sprinting:
  • Sprinting, but not to dropoff, can precede SLRVJ training


Templates for combined DLRVJ/SLRVJ training will be given in part 4.


STIM for Intermediate & Advanced Athletes

During a peaking block, one of the best ways to improve SLRVJ (or any VJ/RVJ for that matter), is to make use of STIM methods. Since SLRVJ can shut down very quickly in the face of fatigue, it is best to manage fatigue properly during a peaking block. See ratio & progressive overload blog entries.

STIM can be achieved in a few ways:
  • Per session: Trying to stimulate performance within the current session
  • Next session: Trying to stimulate performance for the next session

[html] [b]STIM: Per session[/b] Here, we utilize a heavy INITIAL exercise, followed by rest, then perform a explosive/ballistic SUBSEQUENT exercise. The SUBSEQUENT exercise should be a SECONDARY-movement-efficiency-exercise (bounds etc). Optionally, other assistance exercises could be used for the subsequent exercise. The heavy exercise, followed by adequate rest, is used to enhance performance and adaptation of the second exercise. A Few examples: REA followed by bounds: This is one complex, perform 1-3 complexes based on advanced-experience level. [*]REA squat: 50-70% 1RM: 2 x 3, 2-3 minutes rest between sets [*]Bounds: 2-3 x 6-8 (total contacts), rest 4 minutes between sets [*]rest 6-8 minutes [*]optional: repeat for next rotation of the complex [html]

Heavy Squat, Lunge, Or 12" stepup followed by Overloaded bounds or weighted quick lunges: This is one complex, perform 1-3 complexes based on advanced-experience level.
  • Heavy squat, lunge, or 12" stepup: 80-90% 1RM, 2 x 2-3 reps (total for DL, each for SL), 3-5 minutes rest between sets
  • Overloaded (vested) bounds or weighted quick lunges: 2-3 x 8-12 (total contacts), 3-5 minutes rest between sets
  • rest 6-10 minutes
  • optional: repeat for next rotation of the complex




STIM: Next session

Here, we utilize a heavy lifting session to potentiate or ramp up the CNS for the next session. The best way to do this is to utilize MSEM protocols, using either squat, 12" stepup, or walking lunges as the exercise. All exercises would be done for heavy singles, with very low volume:

  • MSEM-style full, half, or quarter squat: 2-3 x 2-4 reps, rest between reps
  • MSEM-style 12 inch stepups: 2-3 x 2-3 reps each leg, rest between reps after both legs have performed a stepup, penultimate leg first.
  • MSEM-style walking lunges: 2-3 x 2-3 reps each leg, rest between reps after both legs have performed a stepup, penultimate leg first.

Body Composition

A low body fat percentage will ensure the highest possible SLRVJ that is possible based on your current strength levels. When an when-not to focus on body composition is important.

Overweight individuals
  • Getting down to an athletic body fat of at least 12% should be a priority


Athletic individuals
  • GPP/BWC Phases: A general concern about maintaining an athletic body composition.
  • GPP/BWC Phases: Drastic dietary alterations should be avoided, considering the volume during these blocks.
  • Don't try and reduce body fat in conjunction with a high volume block.
  • Since body composition is kept within reasonable levels, reducing bodyfat should happen gradually during a peaking period. Again, nothing drastic. It is essential that strength does not drop while decreasing bodyfat if peaking SLRVJ is the priority.




Core

Core is very important and should not be neglected. I like to split core up into two parts:

  • Stabilization
  • Circuits


Stabilization is the most important, considering it helps to improve pelvis stability. Weak links in pelvis stability can manifest themselves at the ankle, knee, and hip during SLRVJ's. If any of these weak links exist, SLRVJ will suffer. I prefer to do these for 30-60 seconds. Any longer than 60 seconds is pointless, in my humble-awesome opinion (IMHAO). So once you achieve a level of 45-60 seconds with proper form, you can consider adding weight. Athletes develop insane pelvic stability when they can front pillar 3+ plates with proper form & ab control, as well as single leg side pillar with 1+ plate.

Stabilization exercises
  • Front pillar
  • Side pillar
  • Single leg side pillar



Core Circuits: Can consist of any of the following
  • Unsupported situps
  • Situps
  • Dead bug crunches
  • V-ups
  • Hanging or supine leg lifts
  • Prone cobra
  • Prone superman
  • Bicycle crunches
  • Rollouts
  • Physioball jack knifes
  • Brucee Lee's
  • Hanging or supine knee ups
  • Other good stuff


I prefer to pick 4-5 exercises, and perform them for ~30 seconds, in a nearly non-stop rotation. Possibly 10 seconds rest between each exercise, or no rest at all. Following each rotation, ~1 minute rest. Perform 2-4 rotations.




Flexibility

Going to keep this part very simple. Static stretching prior to explosive/ballistic/strength sessions can reduce performance.

Guidelines for flexibility
  • DO NOT STATIC STRETCH BEFORE ATHLETIC COMPETITION
  • DO NOT STATIC STRETCH BEFORE MOVEMENT EFFICIENCY SESSIONS (skill / plyo)
  • Static stretching prior to weight training can be beneficial, that's case dependent. If something "feels tight", stretch it. If you feel fine, don't. Stretching the "prime movers" is not a good idea.
  • If you're starting to feel tight, stretch AFTER your sessions.
  • If you like stretching, stretch AFTER your sessions.
  • Pre-session warmups should include dynamic mobility.



Takeoff Angle

For SLRVJ's, a takeoff angle of 60+ degrees is needed. Failure to achieve this optimal angle is a result of insufficient quadriceps strength. Following the guidelines in this article will fix these issues.

60 degree angle for visual reference:







GUESS WHO IS GOING TO SLEEP. ME.

-- adarqui


LBSS

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Muscles are nonsensical they have nothing to do with this bullshit.

- Avishek

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LBSS

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Re: The Single Leg Jumper's Toolbox: Part 1, 2, & 3
« Reply #4 on: February 25, 2010, 05:21:21 pm »
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No doubt. Nice article. When's part IV?
Muscles are nonsensical they have nothing to do with this bullshit.

- Avishek

handstand + backflip + flag

adarqui

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Re: The Single Leg Jumper's Toolbox: Part 1, 2, & 3
« Reply #5 on: February 25, 2010, 05:33:14 pm »
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No doubt. Nice article. When's part IV?

part 4 will be templates (GPP/strength/power/stim etc).. showing example workouts etc for each movement efficiency level + weightlifting experience COUPLET (hehe). Just lots of examples organized by experience level.. since some people might have a problem filling in the exercises for each session.

I should have it done in a few weeks, but im working on some other stuff currently. I have so much stuff i'm working on right now it's getting ridiculous.. :)

I'm going to do this same type of thing for DL RVJ eventually too.

pc man


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Re: The Single Leg Jumper's Toolbox: Part 1, 2, & 3
« Reply #6 on: February 25, 2010, 10:51:35 pm »
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wow, just read thru the first bits, and im excited alr.
thanks alot my man, i'll definitely be pickin up things here.

the links to video descriptions are a super touch, for ppl like me who dun understand what the terms meant...

^5!!
BW: 74kg
Ht: 174cm, 5'8
reach: 220cm

adarqui

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Re: The Single Leg Jumper's Toolbox: Part 1, 2, & 3
« Reply #7 on: February 25, 2010, 11:09:39 pm »
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wow, just read thru the first bits, and im excited alr.
thanks alot my man, i'll definitely be pickin up things here.

the links to video descriptions are a super touch, for ppl like me who dun understand what the terms meant...

^5!!

thanks man glad you got something out of it!

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Re: The Single Leg Jumper's Toolbox: Part 1, 2, & 3
« Reply #8 on: February 26, 2010, 01:31:54 pm »
-1
Yeah good stuff.

I'm closing in on my plyo training so I definitely need this.

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Re: The Single Leg Jumper's Toolbox: Part 1, 2, & 3
« Reply #9 on: February 27, 2010, 08:27:33 am »
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im basically ask about ur opinion on the need for stim. I guess you end your whatever cycle,deload,stim and pr.
Is it really worthd to stress the cns by stim for a bigger pr? You could use that time to train....
Do you think after a pr by stim compared to a pr without stim you can constantly replicate the 'stim pr' again without stim and without additional training(such as becoming better at bounds will give u an equal performsnce cuz u ovefloaded the movement and u got better, so if u were to stim again, ud get an even bettef pr)? I mean, the 'stim pr' will stay there and u will be able to replicate it when youre rested??  If so, whats the 'training' you would do to keep the pr there? And how would u integrate that into the next training cycle?
re-evaluate, daniel-san, re-evaluate

adarqui

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Re: The Single Leg Jumper's Toolbox: Part 1, 2, & 3
« Reply #10 on: February 27, 2010, 02:29:36 pm »
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im basically ask about ur opinion on the need for stim. I guess you end your whatever cycle,deload,stim and pr.

? cycle, stim, stim-deload

PR during stim & stim deload

stim = more intense but still stim

stim-deload = something like MSEM once per week

Quote

Is it really worthd to stress the cns by stim for a bigger pr? You could use that time to train....


? stim is less stressful on the cns than hypertrophy/strength block... because with stim you have to keep the overall volume low, intensity high, and use full rest intervals.

there's never just a 'time to train' period IMO, not for non-elite non-genetic athletes... some form of max/explosive strength maintenance has to be used year round.. if you want to dedicate all of your time to training for the skill, well, a small portion should be to maintain max strength, which would be some low volume + high intensity squat and or lunges/stepups once per week.

Quote
Do you think after a pr by stim compared to a pr without stim you can constantly replicate the 'stim pr' again without stim and without additional training(such as becoming better at bounds will give u an equal performsnce cuz u ovefloaded the movement and u got better, so if u were to stim again, ud get an even bettef pr)? I mean, the 'stim pr' will stay there and u will be able to replicate it when youre rested?? 

ya you can keep PR's using stim.. you just have to try and maintain the PR.. if you can create PR level jumping / sprinting, then subsequent sessions should be aimed at improving the consistency of achieving that results OR just PR'n again.. by PR'n, your body is showing that it can handle that new performance level, which adds in itself a new level of intensity to each skill session, so the trick is to keep it within range:

- using normal stim protocols to obtain more consistent sprints /jumps near or at that pr
- using more intense stim protocols to try and obtain a new PR

by using stim-like methods, the body is firing optimally come skill-session time.. so these skill sessions that are 'enhanced' with stim become a MORE POWERFUL stimulus than just training with fatigue...

if you jump 40" off a run.. then you stim a 41", you have taught your body how to create 41" and introduced a more intense skill training session because of the new 1" gain in RVJ.. so the trick here would be to try and achieve 40-41" MORE OFTEN, more consistently.. so you might not PR right off the bat again with stim, but your overall session quality should be better.. stack a few of these onto each other and you get new PR's.


Quote
If so, whats the 'training' you would do to keep the pr there? And how would u integrate that into the next training cycle?

well i like MSEM stuff.. combine MSEM with skill/plyo work into a block and it's pretty golden.. you can ratio it with an occasional fatigue session, to create a dip in performance to give you some bigger rebounds..

ie: strength(fatigue wo):stim  => 1:3  ..... so for every 3 workouts of stim, you drop in a fatigue wo, ie, 2x5 squat/2x5 lunges/2x5 stepup..

stim sessions potentiate your skill work.. fatigue session causes a dip in performance.. while rebounding out of this dip, eventually you will 'supercompensate' a few days later, so you stack another 3 stim sessions onto it.. trying to ride that supercompenation.

u see?

so, with any block, it has to end... you might be able to do that effectively for 4-8 weeks, with slight variations... after that it's time to either build up work capacity again or whatever..


ok man i have to go get some food bbiab.

pc

djoe

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Re: The Single Leg Jumper's Toolbox: Part 1, 2, & 3
« Reply #11 on: February 28, 2010, 12:08:09 pm »
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i am too lazy to answer this, but i will, soon ;D
re-evaluate, daniel-san, re-evaluate

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Re: The Single Leg Jumper's Toolbox: Part 1, 2, & 3
« Reply #12 on: August 01, 2010, 03:59:29 pm »
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i am too lazy to answer this, but i will, soon ;D


Definitely.

Raptor

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Re: The Single Leg Jumper's Toolbox: Part 1, 2, & 3
« Reply #13 on: August 15, 2010, 06:13:05 am »
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It's interesting that you haven't included the 1-leg RDL as a strength exercise. I feel like my glutes work very well using it, and it's one of my favorite exercises.

adarqui

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Re: The Single Leg Jumper's Toolbox: Part 1, 2, & 3
« Reply #14 on: August 15, 2010, 06:15:37 am »
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It's interesting that you haven't included the 1-leg RDL as a strength exercise. I feel like my glutes work very well using it, and it's one of my favorite exercises.

ya it could be added, as could anything people find effective, but i'm not big on it though.

peace!