Author Topic: 2 problems with vertical jump  (Read 966 times)

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fast does lie

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2 problems with vertical jump
« on: January 01, 2013, 09:25:39 pm »
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1) what tends to be the problem when one's RVJ is virtually the same as SVJ, and maybe even lower?

2) what factors cause one's actual vertical to be so much lower than theoretical vj calculator?  Shorter than average height?  legs to torso ratio?



33yrs | 24in SVJ | >45% BF | 227LB | 5'9 | 7'5 reach | 400lb max squat paused | 5'8 wingspan | 26in RVJ

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Goal: Maintain 385-405lb squat while cutting down to 165 LB

entropy

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Re: 2 problems with vertical jump
« Reply #1 on: January 01, 2013, 10:39:09 pm »
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RVJ == SVJ has a very simple explanation, to wit da physiks says

Quote
The mass of a body determines the momentum p of the body at given velocity v ; it is a proportionality factor in the formula:

p=mv

The factor m is referred to as inertial mass.

But mass, as related to 'inertia' of a body, can be defined also by the formula:

F=ma

Here, F is force, m is mass, and a is acceleration.

By this formula, the greater its mass, the less a body accelerates under given force. Masses  defined by formula (1) and (2) are equal because formula (2) is a consequence of formula (1) if mass does not depend on time and velocity. Thus, "mass is the quantitative or numerical measure of body’s inertia, that is of its resistance to being accelerated".

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Inertia#Mass_and_inertia

So if your svj = rvj, chances are you're not getting any benefit from the rvj since your inertia is so great it doesn't lead to any significant additional acceleration in the rvj case compared to the svj case.  Or put another way, as inertia goes up (compared to your athletic inertial mass), rvj approaches svj. That'd be my best guess. The closer you are to your athletic mass, the more acceleration you can get out of a running jump.
« Last Edit: January 01, 2013, 10:44:43 pm by entropy »
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fast does lie

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Re: 2 problems with vertical jump
« Reply #2 on: January 02, 2013, 12:55:05 am »
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Yeah my guess was bc I'm carrying too much fat
33yrs | 24in SVJ | >45% BF | 227LB | 5'9 | 7'5 reach | 400lb max squat paused | 5'8 wingspan | 26in RVJ

Coming back from 2 years of inactivity!

Goal: Maintain 385-405lb squat while cutting down to 165 LB

Raptor

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Re: 2 problems with vertical jump
« Reply #3 on: January 02, 2013, 07:19:31 am »
+1
1) what tends to be the problem when one's RVJ is virtually the same as SVJ, and maybe even lower?

2) what factors cause one's actual vertical to be so much lower than theoretical vj calculator?  Shorter than average height?  legs to torso ratio?


1) Calf strength and jumping movement efficiency (lack of practice of actual jumps to the rim, not plyos)
2) Lack of jumping movement efficiency. When you build strength you build POTENTIAL of better jumps. To use that potential you need to practice jumping.