Author Topic: Is training TOO hard any good?  (Read 822 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

fast does lie

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2442
  • Aries Merritt boss
  • Respect: +386
    • View Profile
Is training TOO hard any good?
« on: August 16, 2017, 04:29:51 pm »
-1
For example yesterday I did some insane volume at heavier weights.

If I were to push myself to the limit and say do the same today while being super stiff and sore..... albeit I don't get injured, would that be beneficial?
33yrs | 24in SVJ | >45% BF | 227LB | 5'9 | 7'5 reach | 400lb max squat paused | 5'8 wingspan | 26in RVJ

Coming back from 2 years of inactivity!

Goal: Maintain 385-405lb squat while cutting down to 165 LB

adarqui

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 29593
  • who run it.
  • Respect: +6997
    • View Profile
    • Email
Re: Is training TOO hard any good?
« Reply #1 on: August 16, 2017, 04:52:30 pm »
+3
after your slit-wrists comment directed at acole, which was definitely crossing the line, I really didn't want to reply.. but I will this time. Most people on here probably won't reply until you cool down for a while, they just won't feel the need to help you if you are causing problems. Once that number hits 100%, it'll be futile to even post on here. So dude just relax.

For example yesterday I did some insane volume at heavier weights.

If I were to push myself to the limit and say do the same today while being super stiff and sore..... albeit I don't get injured, would that be beneficial?

It can be very beneficial. The thing you need to understand though is, the most important aspect of training through soreness/fatigue, is to actually dig yourself DEEPER into a hole. By increasing fatigue, it's basically like pulling an arrow back to the maximum on a bow, and then you rest a few days, or slowly deload, and your performance can increase quite dramatically past current levels. It's a more pronounced super compensation effect due to accumulated fatigue.

so generally, training through fatigue and soreness isn't a great idea; risk of injury & severe CNS fatigue increases if you push yourself past the breaking point, especially if you do it for too long (too many consecutive days & sessions too long in duration). So more experience and a high level of fitness/work capacity will make it much safer & more effective.

high frequency training routines manipulate these variables .. another thing you need to realize is, when training through fatigue, you need to understand that your "1RM" or various performance numbers change day to day. So if your fresh 1RM is 405 lb on back squat, it might be 375 when squatting consecutive days etc.. The stubbornness I talked about above, is when people think they should be hitting "fresh numbers" when in a fatigued state, that becomes a problem.

you can search things like: supercompensation effect, accumulated fatigue, delayed training effect etc

as a personal example, during one phase i'd do some reactive work and/or jumps + squatted several times per day, as often as I could. Sessions would last 15-30 minutes. Really quick warmups, some stiff leg pogo hops maybe or MR tuck jumps, workup to a heavy single, 5 rep, or 20 repper. I'd do this for say 3-4 days in a row, take a day or two off, then feel ridiculous & jump really well. I did the same thing with running, kill myself from Monday through Thursday, take 1 day off, then feel ridiculous in a race.

fast does lie

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2442
  • Aries Merritt boss
  • Respect: +386
    • View Profile
Re: Is training TOO hard any good?
« Reply #2 on: August 16, 2017, 04:58:35 pm »
-2
after your slit-wrists comment directed at acole, which was definitely crossing the line, I really didn't want to reply.. but I will this time. Most people on here probably won't reply until you cool down for a while, they just won't feel the need to help you if you are causing problems. Once that number hits 100%, it'll be futile to even post on here. So dude just relax.

For example yesterday I did some insane volume at heavier weights.

If I were to push myself to the limit and say do the same today while being super stiff and sore..... albeit I don't get injured, would that be beneficial?

It can be very beneficial. The thing you need to understand though is, the most important aspect of training through soreness/fatigue, is to actually dig yourself DEEPER into a hole. By increasing fatigue, it's basically like pulling an arrow back to the maximum on a bow, and then you rest a few days, or slowly deload, and your performance can increase quite dramatically past current levels. It's a super compensation effect due to accumulated fatigue.

so generally, training through fatigue and soreness isn't a great idea; risk of injury & severe CNS fatigue increases if you push yourself past the breaking point, especially if you do it for too long (too many consecutive days & sessions too long in duration). So more experience and a high level of fitness/work capacity will make it much safer & more effective.

high frequency training routines manipulate these variables .. another thing you need to realize is, when training through fatigue, you need to understand that your "1RM" or various performance numbers change day to day. So if your fresh 1RM is 405 lb on back squat, it might be 375 when squatting consecutive days etc.. The stubbornness I talked about above, is when people think they should be hitting "fresh numbers" when in a fatigued state, that becomes a problem.

you can search things like: supercompensation effect, accumulated fatigue, delayed training effect etc

as a personal example, during one phase i'd do some reactive work and/or jumps + squatted several times per day, as often as I could. Sessions would last 15-30 minutes. Really quick warmups, some stiff leg pogo hops maybe or MR tuck jumps, workup to a heavy single, 5 rep, or 20 repper. I'd do this for say 3-4 days in a row, take a day or two off, then feel ridiculous & jump really well. I did the same thing with running, kill myself from Monday through Thursday, take 1 day off, then feel ridiculous in a race.

He was another one of those that I just ignored while he disrespected me for the last few months, then today out of no where he comes out and says all this shit again, so I just stooped down to his level and got into disrespect war.  ;D

Thanks for taking the time to break it down !  :ibjumping:

33yrs | 24in SVJ | >45% BF | 227LB | 5'9 | 7'5 reach | 400lb max squat paused | 5'8 wingspan | 26in RVJ

Coming back from 2 years of inactivity!

Goal: Maintain 385-405lb squat while cutting down to 165 LB

adarqui

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 29593
  • who run it.
  • Respect: +6997
    • View Profile
    • Email
Re: Is training TOO hard any good?
« Reply #3 on: August 16, 2017, 05:03:52 pm »
0
after your slit-wrists comment directed at acole, which was definitely crossing the line, I really didn't want to reply.. but I will this time. Most people on here probably won't reply until you cool down for a while, they just won't feel the need to help you if you are causing problems. Once that number hits 100%, it'll be futile to even post on here. So dude just relax.

For example yesterday I did some insane volume at heavier weights.

If I were to push myself to the limit and say do the same today while being super stiff and sore..... albeit I don't get injured, would that be beneficial?

It can be very beneficial. The thing you need to understand though is, the most important aspect of training through soreness/fatigue, is to actually dig yourself DEEPER into a hole. By increasing fatigue, it's basically like pulling an arrow back to the maximum on a bow, and then you rest a few days, or slowly deload, and your performance can increase quite dramatically past current levels. It's a super compensation effect due to accumulated fatigue.

so generally, training through fatigue and soreness isn't a great idea; risk of injury & severe CNS fatigue increases if you push yourself past the breaking point, especially if you do it for too long (too many consecutive days & sessions too long in duration). So more experience and a high level of fitness/work capacity will make it much safer & more effective.

high frequency training routines manipulate these variables .. another thing you need to realize is, when training through fatigue, you need to understand that your "1RM" or various performance numbers change day to day. So if your fresh 1RM is 405 lb on back squat, it might be 375 when squatting consecutive days etc.. The stubbornness I talked about above, is when people think they should be hitting "fresh numbers" when in a fatigued state, that becomes a problem.

you can search things like: supercompensation effect, accumulated fatigue, delayed training effect etc

as a personal example, during one phase i'd do some reactive work and/or jumps + squatted several times per day, as often as I could. Sessions would last 15-30 minutes. Really quick warmups, some stiff leg pogo hops maybe or MR tuck jumps, workup to a heavy single, 5 rep, or 20 repper. I'd do this for say 3-4 days in a row, take a day or two off, then feel ridiculous & jump really well. I did the same thing with running, kill myself from Monday through Thursday, take 1 day off, then feel ridiculous in a race.

He was another one of those that I just ignored while he disrespected me for the last few months, then today out of no where he comes out and says all this shit again, so I just stooped down to his level and got into disrespect war.  ;D

bleh.

Quote
Thanks for taking the time to break it down !  :ibjumping:

fast does lie

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2442
  • Aries Merritt boss
  • Respect: +386
    • View Profile
Re: Is training TOO hard any good?
« Reply #4 on: August 16, 2017, 05:08:36 pm »
0
I dunno I mean I thought pushing myself to the limit was not so good because it destroys CNS, but than I saw this and now I'm thinking maybe it's not so bad to push yourself to the absolute brink than rest up.

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9iVh87XtL_4" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9iVh87XtL_4</a>

33yrs | 24in SVJ | >45% BF | 227LB | 5'9 | 7'5 reach | 400lb max squat paused | 5'8 wingspan | 26in RVJ

Coming back from 2 years of inactivity!

Goal: Maintain 385-405lb squat while cutting down to 165 LB

acole14

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1547
  • Respect: +1034
    • View Profile
Re: Is training TOO hard any good?
« Reply #5 on: August 17, 2017, 12:27:09 am »
+2
after your slit-wrists comment directed at acole, which was definitely crossing the line, I really didn't want to reply.. but I will this time. Most people on here probably won't reply until you cool down for a while, they just won't feel the need to help you if you are causing problems. Once that number hits 100%, it'll be futile to even post on here. So dude just relax.

Eh, I'd be offended if every one of his posts didn't scream: "I HAVE INFERIORITY COMPLEX". He's melting down harder than Fukushima after his little stunt trolling LBSS backfired in his face. I guess he thought it was like when you get locked up and the first thing you do is go and punch the biggest guy in the yard in the back of the head to show that you're alpha dog. Bless  ::)
« Last Edit: August 17, 2017, 01:14:03 am by acole14 »

acole14

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1547
  • Respect: +1034
    • View Profile
Re: Is training TOO hard any good?
« Reply #6 on: August 17, 2017, 01:13:41 am »
+1
He was another one of those that I just ignored while he disrespected me for the last few months, then today out of no where he comes out and says all this shit again, so I just stooped down to his level and got into disrespect war.  ;D

The weird thing is, I barely commented on your threads except when you asked why you were being negged. Like I said somewhere else, I had no issues with you coming back and training hard, was good to see you lifting some nice weights, some decent contributions, but then you went ham on LBSS because you're a still a hateful shit-stain of a bloke and enough was enough. I knew you'd pull your 'slit your wrists' shit on me (you were itching to do it obviously) but I couldn't give a fuck, as mentioned below.

Conversely, if you want to be a real man and apologise, I'm on-board: this is a tolerant forum and I'm all for second (and third and fourth) chances. Ball's in your court.

fast does lie

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2442
  • Aries Merritt boss
  • Respect: +386
    • View Profile
Re: Is training TOO hard any good?
« Reply #7 on: August 24, 2017, 02:49:38 am »
+1
this got deleted accidentally i think by adarq, but 1) yes i do have inferiority complex and acole somehow pinned it on the dot 2) i do apologize for all undue disrespect, however, there is also a thin line between disrespect and truth.....
33yrs | 24in SVJ | >45% BF | 227LB | 5'9 | 7'5 reach | 400lb max squat paused | 5'8 wingspan | 26in RVJ

Coming back from 2 years of inactivity!

Goal: Maintain 385-405lb squat while cutting down to 165 LB