Author Topic: The complete strength training guide by Greg Nuckols  (Read 430 times)

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CoolColJ

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The complete strength training guide by Greg Nuckols
« on: October 20, 2019, 06:02:59 pm »
+2
Basically, learn the lifts, pile on as much muscle as your genetics allow for, then practise and drive neural efficiency

https://www.strongerbyscience.com/complete-strength-training-guide/#Intermediate_Training

So if strength helps athletes, and strength is largely due to muscle mass increase after proficiency is gained, then neural efficiency in the lifts can be largely ignored to a point.
So just get your prime movers large

LBSS

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Re: The complete strength training guide by Greg Nuckols
« Reply #1 on: October 21, 2019, 04:16:05 am »
+1
oh man i love greg nuckols, had forgotten about him. thanks for posting this.
Muscles are nonsensical they have nothing to do with this bullshit.

- Avishek

sunday: long very easy run 80+ mins @ 5:40+ (14+ km)
monday: strength/cross training
tuesday: extensive tempo (7 km) OR fartlek (mostly easy pace with mix of strides, hills, long tempo) 45 mins (8+ km)
wednesday: easy run 60+ mins @ 5:20-5:30 (11+ km)
thursday: easy run 60+ mins @ 5:20-5:30 (11+ km), strength/cross-training
friday: rest
saturday: short tempo 6-8x500 @ sub-4:00 (7 km)

strength would be:
- hops 2x10
- box jumps or ME SVJ 2x5
- squats 3x6-8 or weighted BSS/lunges 3x10/leg
- RDL/hypers 2x10-12 or SLRDL 2x10-12/leg
- upper push myo-reps or sets to technical failure
- upper pull myo-reps or sets to technical failure
- leg raises, holds, pallof presses

Dreyth

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Re: The complete strength training guide by Greg Nuckols
« Reply #2 on: October 21, 2019, 02:11:09 pm »
+1
Awesome read!

My takeaway is that perhaps I've been overrating neural work for myself (3 rep work) and underrating higher rep work for mass (8+) and VOLUME

However, I got to this part:


Quote
Keep volume for your main lifts low to moderate, and stay at least 1-2 reps shy of failure at all times (avoiding technical failure).  You don’t need a ton of high quality, heavy work to maintain and improve neural factors, but getting the bulk of your training volume from your main lifts will generally beat you up a bit more, and limit how much total training volume you can handle per session and per week.

This goes against what I remember learning in a verkoshansky book, i believe it was. Basically you dont stimulate all of your muscles until you are basically just about at failure. I remember after learning this, i saw some pretty quick strength gains when i put an end to stopping 2-3 reps short. These days, I stop when I think my next rep will be a fail.



Also:

Quote
I recommend accessory lifts over lighter sets of squat, bench, and deadlift to cut down on risk of overuse injuries, and to keep training specificity high for the main lifts (since lifting heavy stuff for low reps and lighter stuff for higher reps are different skills, you don’t want to “water down” the motor learning you’re doing your main lifts, unless you’re splitting your training into more distinct phases, as we’ll discuss later).

I've always been a fan of "just squat more if I want to get better at my squat." But I never thought of 1) avoiding injuries by mixing it up, and 2) this would lower training specificity by watering down my big lifts with fatigued sets of higher reps
« Last Edit: October 21, 2019, 02:18:47 pm by Dreyth »
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CoolColJ

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Re: The complete strength training guide by Greg Nuckols
« Reply #3 on: October 22, 2019, 01:14:42 am »
0
regarding training to failure

https://twitter.com/BradSchoenfeld/status/1185669914079703041

so keeping a few reps in the tank can allow you to do more volume
« Last Edit: October 22, 2019, 01:17:18 am by CoolColJ »

Dreyth

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Re: The complete strength training guide by Greg Nuckols
« Reply #4 on: October 22, 2019, 11:27:01 am »
0
regarding training to failure

https://twitter.com/BradSchoenfeld/status/1185669914079703041

so keeping a few reps in the tank can allow you to do more volume

its behind a paywall :/
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CoolColJ

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CoolColJ

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Re: The complete strength training guide by Greg Nuckols
« Reply #6 on: October 25, 2019, 07:15:22 am »
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Quote
Given that heavy loads (1–5RM) cause hypertrophy without the need for fatigue, it seems likely that the final five reps of a set to failure can be defined as stimulating. The true number might be slightly smaller or slightly larger, and it might differ between individuals and muscles. In fact, it is likely to be quite a bit larger in completely untrained lifters, because they have far more motor units with muscle fibers that have not yet reached a plateau in size. Nevertheless, the final five reps of a set to failure is likely a fair benchmark, and we can therefore deduct reps when using RIR to identify the real training volume in each set. Training with 1RIR on each set involves four stimulating reps, training with 2RIR involves three stimulating reps, and so on.

https://medium.com/@SandCResearch/when-is-high-volume-training-not-actually-high-in-volume-4529810e930f

Quote
For example, when training with 5 sets of 10 reps with the same weight with the squat or bench press, taking 5 minutes rest between sets, and aiming to reach failure only on the final set, the proximity to failure is 7RIR on the first set, 4–5RIR on the second set, 3RIR on the third set, 2RIR on the fourth set, and 0RIR on the final set. The total number of stimulating reps is 10 or 11, which is smaller than you would achieve by doing 3 sets of 5 reps to failure.

« Last Edit: October 25, 2019, 07:17:36 am by CoolColJ »

Dreyth

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Re: The complete strength training guide by Greg Nuckols
« Reply #7 on: October 25, 2019, 12:49:04 pm »
+1
^^^ That's why I don't do 4 sets of 12 anymore or whatever. It's always something like 12-10-8-6 with a RIR of 1 on each set. I realized one day that if I do 4x12, then I have so much more left in the tank in the first couple of sets and maybe I'm not stimulating my muscles as much anymore

however i do want to switch up my training and add more high volume accessory work, especially while on my bulk currently. so thanks for making this thread!
« Last Edit: October 25, 2019, 12:51:41 pm by Dreyth »
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CoolColJ

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Re: The complete strength training guide by Greg Nuckols
« Reply #8 on: October 27, 2019, 08:38:28 am »
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Quote
Greg Nuckols
‏ @GregNuckols

Lazy programming tip:

Take any generally decent hypertrophy program, add 2-3 heavy singles (RPE 7-9ish) before the volume work for your main lifts, and you have yourself a pretty good year-round strength program for intermediate lifters.