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D4

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Some questions I would like answers to
« on: March 25, 2011, 09:55:16 pm »
+1
Sorry for the many questions, some are pretty obvious, but I would just like some clarifications.

1)  If I want to train for some muscle hypertrophy for my upper body, what are the rep/set/rest duration schemes and what's the difference compared to just training for strength without hypertrophy?

2)  Is it really impossible to gain muscle mass while losing some body fat?  If not, how do you do it?

3)  If I wanna have like a RFD/speed/explosive lower body workout day of sprints AND weight training, do I sprint AFTER or BEFORE the weight room?

4)  I've constantly been hearing conflicting information about core/mid-section strength in relation to athleticism/vertical jump.  Can strength training your abs/obliques/lower back really increase your athleticism/vertical?

Thanks in advance.
Goal is to dunk.

Vertical needed to dunk: 40"

Current vertical : 38.5"

LanceSTS

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Re: Some questions I would like answers to
« Reply #1 on: March 25, 2011, 11:42:05 pm »
+1
Sorry for the many questions, some are pretty obvious, but I would just like some clarifications.

1)  If I want to train for some muscle hypertrophy for my upper body, what are the rep/set/rest duration schemes and what's the difference compared to just training for strength without hypertrophy?

In all honesty, the deciding factor on how much strength vs hypertrophy you get is your diet.  There are about 100,000 different ways you could go about this, but as long as you are working with at least ~ 80 +% of your maximum for a reasonable amount of volume, using lifts that actually matter, using progressive overload, and getting plenty of protein you will build muscle tissue at a solid rate.  It really is that simple, pick some basic compound exercises (vertical push, vertical pull, horizontal push, horizontal pull) and add a couple of isolation exercises here and there and you have it.

Quote
2)  Is it really impossible to gain muscle mass while losing some body fat?  If not, how do you do it?

Of course it is, a very simple way is keeping protein extremely high, fats to a moderate to high level (depending on activity levels), and controlling carbohydrate intake.  Moderate the volume on your lifting program so that you are still getting stronger, sometimes this requires a lower frequency of lifting and sometimes you dont have to change much, but keep a PREMIUM on gains in strength in the weight room.  You will be surprised how much protein and fats you can eat if you limit the carbs to a bare minimum and still build lean tissue while losing bodyfat. 

Quote
3)  If I wanna have like a RFD/speed/explosive lower body workout day of sprints AND weight training, do I sprint AFTER or BEFORE the weight room?

Sprint BEFORE.

Quote
4)  I've constantly been hearing conflicting information about core/mid-section strength in relation to athleticism/vertical jump.  Can strength training your abs/obliques/lower back really increase your athleticism/vertical?

Not to the degree that its hyped by a lot of "trainers", and even then its an indirect correlation.  The core strength can help you maintain good athletic positions on the field/court and in the weight room by enabling better pelvic control and core stability, which will help, but doing med ball twists and planks wont give you 5 inches on your jumps by itself.

Quote
Thanks in advance.
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D4

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Re: Some questions I would like answers to
« Reply #2 on: March 26, 2011, 05:15:37 am »
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2)  Is it really impossible to gain muscle mass while losing some body fat?  If not, how do you do it?

Of course it is, a very simple way is keeping protein extremely high, fats to a moderate to high level (depending on activity levels), and controlling carbohydrate intake.  Moderate the volume on your lifting program so that you are still getting stronger, sometimes this requires a lower frequency of lifting and sometimes you dont have to change much, but keep a PREMIUM on gains in strength in the weight room.  You will be surprised how much protein and fats you can eat if you limit the carbs to a bare minimum and still build lean tissue while losing bodyfat. 


I should have specified a little bit more, but I'm assuming the answer stays the same even if I mention that I will be doing lots of cardio from full court basketball like 3-5x a week 1.5-3hrs each?


Quote
4)  I've constantly been hearing conflicting information about core/mid-section strength in relation to athleticism/vertical jump.  Can strength training your abs/obliques/lower back really increase your athleticism/vertical?

Not to the degree that its hyped by a lot of "trainers", and even then its an indirect correlation.  The core strength can help you maintain good athletic positions on the field/court and in the weight room by enabling better pelvic control and core stability, which will help, but doing med ball twists and planks wont give you 5 inches on your jumps by itself.


So does this mean, as long as you have your core strength up to a certain degree where you are able to have pelvic control and core stability during athletic movements, any more training will not lead to any more athletic gains, directly or indirectly?

If that is so, is there a way to know if my core strength is good enough to the point where I have solid core stability and pelvic control?

Thanks again.
Goal is to dunk.

Vertical needed to dunk: 40"

Current vertical : 38.5"

Clarence

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Re: Some questions I would like answers to
« Reply #3 on: March 26, 2011, 08:48:20 am »
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I should have specified a little bit more, but I'm assuming the answer stays the same even if I mention that I will be doing lots of cardio from full court basketball like 3-5x a week 1.5-3hrs each?

With that kind of schedule putting on any appreciable lean muscle mass is pretty tough...or at least beyond newbie type gains.  But there's a pretty big variance in there... I think 3x/wk for 1.5 hrs is do-able... 5x/wk for 3hrs chances are slim.


Quote

So does this mean, as long as you have your core strength up to a certain degree where you are able to have pelvic control and core stability during athletic movements, any more training will not lead to any more athletic gains, directly or indirectly?

If that is so, is there a way to know if my core strength is good enough to the point where I have solid core stability and pelvic control?

I've never heard anyone complain from having a core that is too strong.  Might as well continue to progressively get it stronger.  Doesn't have to be really time intensive and it can only help all future athletic endeavors (and help prevent injury).




LanceSTS

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Re: Some questions I would like answers to
« Reply #4 on: March 26, 2011, 03:04:32 pm »
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2)  Is it really impossible to gain muscle mass while losing some body fat?  If not, how do you do it?

Of course it is, a very simple way is keeping protein extremely high, fats to a moderate to high level (depending on activity levels), and controlling carbohydrate intake.  Moderate the volume on your lifting program so that you are still getting stronger, sometimes this requires a lower frequency of lifting and sometimes you dont have to change much, but keep a PREMIUM on gains in strength in the weight room.  You will be surprised how much protein and fats you can eat if you limit the carbs to a bare minimum and still build lean tissue while losing bodyfat. 


I should have specified a little bit more, but I'm assuming the answer stays the same even if I mention that I will be doing lots of cardio from full court basketball like 3-5x a week 1.5-3hrs each?


Quote
4)  I've constantly been hearing conflicting information about core/mid-section strength in relation to athleticism/vertical jump.  Can strength training your abs/obliques/lower back really increase your athleticism/vertical?

Not to the degree that its hyped by a lot of "trainers", and even then its an indirect correlation.  The core strength can help you maintain good athletic positions on the field/court and in the weight room by enabling better pelvic control and core stability, which will help, but doing med ball twists and planks wont give you 5 inches on your jumps by itself.


So does this mean, as long as you have your core strength up to a certain degree where you are able to have pelvic control and core stability during athletic movements, any more training will not lead to any more athletic gains, directly or indirectly?

If that is so, is there a way to know if my core strength is good enough to the point where I have solid core stability and pelvic control?

Thanks again.

Its doable with that schedule, its going to depend on a.) how lean you are currently, and b.) how well you manage your diet.  That schedule is not THAT intensive, building muscle tissue while losing bf has been done during collegiate basketball seasons many times, and the schedule is much more intensive.

And yes on the core and pelvic stability, if you can maintain good positioning during top speed jumps, sprints, heavy lifts like squats and deads, etc., the you already have "enough" core strength.  The problem with a lot of kids training for vertical jumping is they spend an excessive amount of time doing things like med ball twists, core stability exercises, sit up-s, cruches, etc., when that time could be better used to actually do something more beneficial. The best way to go about it pick one or two good core exercises, do a couple of sets of them at the end of the workout, and progress the intensity (load). 
Relax.

D4

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Re: Some questions I would like answers to
« Reply #5 on: April 02, 2011, 05:01:18 pm »
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2)  Is it really impossible to gain muscle mass while losing some body fat?  If not, how do you do it?

Of course it is, a very simple way is keeping protein extremely high, fats to a moderate to high level (depending on activity levels), and controlling carbohydrate intake.  Moderate the volume on your lifting program so that you are still getting stronger, sometimes this requires a lower frequency of lifting and sometimes you dont have to change much, but keep a PREMIUM on gains in strength in the weight room.  You will be surprised how much protein and fats you can eat if you limit the carbs to a bare minimum and still build lean tissue while losing bodyfat.  


I should have specified a little bit more, but I'm assuming the answer stays the same even if I mention that I will be doing lots of cardio from full court basketball like 3-5x a week 1.5-3hrs each?


Quote
4)  I've constantly been hearing conflicting information about core/mid-section strength in relation to athleticism/vertical jump.  Can strength training your abs/obliques/lower back really increase your athleticism/vertical?

Not to the degree that its hyped by a lot of "trainers", and even then its an indirect correlation.  The core strength can help you maintain good athletic positions on the field/court and in the weight room by enabling better pelvic control and core stability, which will help, but doing med ball twists and planks wont give you 5 inches on your jumps by itself.


So does this mean, as long as you have your core strength up to a certain degree where you are able to have pelvic control and core stability during athletic movements, any more training will not lead to any more athletic gains, directly or indirectly?

If that is so, is there a way to know if my core strength is good enough to the point where I have solid core stability and pelvic control?

Thanks again.

Its doable with that schedule, its going to depend on a.) how lean you are currently, and b.) how well you manage your diet.  That schedule is not THAT intensive, building muscle tissue while losing bf has been done during collegiate basketball seasons many times, and the schedule is much more intensive.

And yes on the core and pelvic stability, if you can maintain good positioning during top speed jumps, sprints, heavy lifts like squats and deads, etc., the you already have "enough" core strength.  The problem with a lot of kids training for vertical jumping is they spend an excessive amount of time doing things like med ball twists, core stability exercises, sit up-s, cruches, etc., when that time could be better used to actually do something more beneficial. The best way to go about it pick one or two good core exercises, do a couple of sets of them at the end of the workout, and progress the intensity (load).  

So like I'm at 13~14% BF.  Is that a level where I can gain muscle and lose fat at the same time?

And about the good "enough" core strength thing.  If I have achieved this good enough level of core strength, am I going to have to continue doing "one or two good core exercises" to main this level of core strength?  Or is the core a thing where it gets worked enough from squats and other lifts and all athletic movements (basketball) to maintain the strength/muscles?

Also Lance, I remember reading somewhere (I forgot) where both you and Adarq said that strength training calf raises to jump higher are better with 20-25 reps...  Why are the calves different than others in regards to this?

And I tried BSS for the first time, I had trouble with balance...  Does this mean I have some stabilizer muscles that are not efficiently developed?  If I continue doing BSS and get better with balance, does this mean I can "recruit" these muscles when I jump (+vertical)?  Basically I'm asking, since I have bad balance, can getting stronger in that area lead to a higher jump?

Thanks.
« Last Edit: April 02, 2011, 05:08:09 pm by Ineedtodunk »
Goal is to dunk.

Vertical needed to dunk: 40"

Current vertical : 38.5"

LanceSTS

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Re: Some questions I would like answers to
« Reply #6 on: April 02, 2011, 05:30:22 pm »
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2)  Is it really impossible to gain muscle mass while losing some body fat?  If not, how do you do it?

Of course it is, a very simple way is keeping protein extremely high, fats to a moderate to high level (depending on activity levels), and controlling carbohydrate intake.  Moderate the volume on your lifting program so that you are still getting stronger, sometimes this requires a lower frequency of lifting and sometimes you dont have to change much, but keep a PREMIUM on gains in strength in the weight room.  You will be surprised how much protein and fats you can eat if you limit the carbs to a bare minimum and still build lean tissue while losing bodyfat.  


I should have specified a little bit more, but I'm assuming the answer stays the same even if I mention that I will be doing lots of cardio from full court basketball like 3-5x a week 1.5-3hrs each?


Quote
4)  I've constantly been hearing conflicting information about core/mid-section strength in relation to athleticism/vertical jump.  Can strength training your abs/obliques/lower back really increase your athleticism/vertical?

Not to the degree that its hyped by a lot of "trainers", and even then its an indirect correlation.  The core strength can help you maintain good athletic positions on the field/court and in the weight room by enabling better pelvic control and core stability, which will help, but doing med ball twists and planks wont give you 5 inches on your jumps by itself.


So does this mean, as long as you have your core strength up to a certain degree where you are able to have pelvic control and core stability during athletic movements, any more training will not lead to any more athletic gains, directly or indirectly?

If that is so, is there a way to know if my core strength is good enough to the point where I have solid core stability and pelvic control?

Thanks again.

Its doable with that schedule, its going to depend on a.) how lean you are currently, and b.) how well you manage your diet.  That schedule is not THAT intensive, building muscle tissue while losing bf has been done during collegiate basketball seasons many times, and the schedule is much more intensive.

And yes on the core and pelvic stability, if you can maintain good positioning during top speed jumps, sprints, heavy lifts like squats and deads, etc., the you already have "enough" core strength.  The problem with a lot of kids training for vertical jumping is they spend an excessive amount of time doing things like med ball twists, core stability exercises, sit up-s, cruches, etc., when that time could be better used to actually do something more beneficial. The best way to go about it pick one or two good core exercises, do a couple of sets of them at the end of the workout, and progress the intensity (load).  

So like I'm at 13~14% BF.  Is that a level where I can gain muscle and lose fat at the same time?

Sure you can, just have to train and eat right.

Quote
And about the good "enough" core strength thing.  If I have achieved this good enough level of core strength, am I going to have to continue doing "one or two good core exercises" to main this level of core strength?  Or is the core a thing where it gets worked enough from squats and other lifts and all athletic movements (basketball) to maintain the strength/muscles?

Its always good to keep at least one good core exercise in your program regardless, just a couple of sets, a couple of times a week is plenty and not time consuming in the least.

Quote
Also Lance, I remember reading somewhere (I forgot) where both you and Adarq said that strength training calf raises to jump higher are better with 20-25 reps...  Why are the calves different than others in regards to this?

the range of motion and time under tension are very small for calf raises compared to other exercises, the total work done with lower reps is VERY low, calves respond much better to higher (15+) rep ranges.

Quote
And I tried BSS for the first time, I had trouble with balance...  Does this mean I have some stabilizer muscles that are not efficiently developed?  If I continue doing BSS and get better with balance, does this mean I can "recruit" these muscles when I jump (+vertical)?  Basically I'm asking, since I have bad balance, can getting stronger in that area lead to a higher jump?

Thanks.

Not necessarily, a lot of people will have trouble with balance on unilateral exercises, especially when they first begin using them.  Getting good at them will help ensure you dont have a strength deficit on either side of the body and improve balance as well.  
Relax.

D4

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Re: Some questions I would like answers to
« Reply #7 on: April 02, 2011, 11:57:52 pm »
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Its always good to keep at least one good core exercise in your program regardless, just a couple of sets, a couple of times a week is plenty and not time consuming in the least.


Let's say this one good core exercise I choose is weighted ab crunches...  What about my lower back (or are these worked through squats) and obliques (are these even needed, I've never seen anyone on here talk about them)?
Goal is to dunk.

Vertical needed to dunk: 40"

Current vertical : 38.5"

LanceSTS

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Re: Some questions I would like answers to
« Reply #8 on: April 03, 2011, 12:07:42 am »
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  The abdominals help protect the lower back, and yes, the low back is worked during deadlifts and squats.  Training the low back directly, (using spinal flexion and extension) is used by some coaches and some label them the anti Christ, I dont think they are necessary for most people if you have a solid program but I dont hate them either.  If you are extremely weak in that area doing some extensions (directly for the low back, not the glutes and hams) can help.  Glenn Pendlay has some good exercises specifically for the spinal erectors on his site at californiastrength.com

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NZJp4Eo1sos" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NZJp4Eo1sos</a>

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NZJp4Eo1sos
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D4

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Re: Some questions I would like answers to
« Reply #9 on: April 03, 2011, 12:15:32 am »
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  The abdominals help protect the lower back, and yes, the low back is worked during deadlifts and squats.  Training the low back directly, (using spinal flexion and extension) is used by some coaches and some label them the anti Christ, I dont think they are necessary for most people if you have a solid program but I dont hate them either.  If you are extremely weak in that area doing some extensions (directly for the low back, not the glutes and hams) can help.  Glenn Pendlay has some good exercises specifically for the spinal erectors on his site at californiastrength.com

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NZJp4Eo1sos" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NZJp4Eo1sos</a>

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NZJp4Eo1sos

So basically, direct lower back work is not necessary unless you are very weak there right?

Sorry to keep bugging, but what about obliques?  Are they really necessary to work out?  No one ever talks about them, but they are essentially considered part of the core aren't they?
Goal is to dunk.

Vertical needed to dunk: 40"

Current vertical : 38.5"

LanceSTS

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Re: Some questions I would like answers to
« Reply #10 on: April 03, 2011, 01:17:05 am »
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  The abdominals help protect the lower back, and yes, the low back is worked during deadlifts and squats.  Training the low back directly, (using spinal flexion and extension) is used by some coaches and some label them the anti Christ, I dont think they are necessary for most people if you have a solid program but I dont hate them either.  If you are extremely weak in that area doing some extensions (directly for the low back, not the glutes and hams) can help.  Glenn Pendlay has some good exercises specifically for the spinal erectors on his site at californiastrength.com

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NZJp4Eo1sos" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NZJp4Eo1sos</a>

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NZJp4Eo1sos

So basically, direct lower back work is not necessary unless you are very weak there right?

  It depends on other factors as well, such as what sport you play, etc., but for the most part, if youre using deadlifts, squats, cleans, snatches, etc. in your program, your lower back is going to get plenty of work in MOST cases.  Athletes with longer torsos tend to have a much harder time with the low back during lifts that put it under shear forces than athletes with shorter torsos and longer legs due to the leverages.

 
Quote
Sorry to keep bugging, but what about obliques?  Are they really necessary to work out?  No one ever talks about them, but they are essentially considered part of the core aren't they?

Chopping movements w/ cables and bands, twists w/grappler or bands, and plates are great for the obliques, side crunches are a waste of time compared to those movements.  Yes, they are part of the core, they are also working during many compound movements and many of the movements listed that engage the obliques are working the abdominals as well.  If you play a sport that involves swinging an object (like a baseball bat), or punching, throwing, etc., using a chopping pattern for your core work is very important.
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D4

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Re: Some questions I would like answers to
« Reply #11 on: April 03, 2011, 02:18:34 am »
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So for core work, I'm assuming I shouldn't spend time on Obliques if I'm a basketball player?

But they would benefit me when I decide to get into Boxing next year?
Goal is to dunk.

Vertical needed to dunk: 40"

Current vertical : 38.5"

LanceSTS

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Re: Some questions I would like answers to
« Reply #12 on: April 03, 2011, 02:30:41 am »
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So for core work, I'm assuming I shouldn't spend time on Obliques if I'm a basketball player?

But they would benefit me when I decide to get into Boxing next year?

Just choose a core exercise that heavily involves them, like cable wood chops, and you got youre core exercise plus some extra work that will help you when you get into boxing.
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Re: Some questions I would like answers to
« Reply #13 on: April 03, 2011, 05:45:55 am »
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You could do weighed crunches + supermans and that's it. Supermans are just back hyperextensions from the floor, with someone holding your legs.

D4

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Re: Some questions I would like answers to
« Reply #14 on: April 03, 2011, 09:03:11 pm »
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I see... thanks Lance.

Well I was also wondering about another thing that just happened...  I had a workout of short sprints and depth jumps on Friday night.  My legs were pretty sore when I woke up Saturday, but I went to the weight room anyways, and I did a full lower body workout, not TOO heavy but explosive stuff like jump squats, weighted exploding step ups, etc...  I was super sore when I woke up the next day.  I was wondering if it's okay to do this? 

Would my saturday workouts kinda nullify my Friday workouts cuz my legs were still sore from the Friday workouts?

Basically from what I've heard from some people, I could potentially have done Friday's workout for nothing, if I worked out those same sore muscles the very next day like I did.  Is this right?  Did I nullify my Friday's workout by working out the same muscles when they were sore?
Goal is to dunk.

Vertical needed to dunk: 40"

Current vertical : 38.5"