Author Topic: posture issues and athletic performance  (Read 2741 times)

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adarqui

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Re: posture issues and athletic performance
« Reply #15 on: December 20, 2017, 10:39:58 pm »
+2
If it's really bad it might take some time to fix. But in my experience the best way is long extended static stretches of around 2 minutes. Elevate the front half of one foot slightly (like on a book or something) and lunge forward until you feel a good stretch, and hold. If you have had a lot of ankle injuries you probably have scar tissue built up in there and it might take some time to work the range of motion back in.

Sounds like what I did with my soleus/ankle stretches during dishes, hah. I'd just ease into it and often hold it for a few minutes, while doing dishes. Definitely seemed to help quite a bit. Tried to find the photo I took, can't find it yet. For people with calf tightness/ankle mobility issues, it could be a decent strategy.

acole14

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Re: posture issues and athletic performance
« Reply #16 on: December 21, 2017, 02:48:45 am »
+1
If it's really bad it might take some time to fix. But in my experience the best way is long extended static stretches of around 2 minutes. Elevate the front half of one foot slightly (like on a book or something) and lunge forward until you feel a good stretch, and hold. If you have had a lot of ankle injuries you probably have scar tissue built up in there and it might take some time to work the range of motion back in.

Sounds like what I did with my soleus/ankle stretches during dishes, hah. I'd just ease into it and often hold it for a few minutes, while doing dishes. Definitely seemed to help quite a bit. Tried to find the photo I took, can't find it yet. For people with calf tightness/ankle mobility issues, it could be a decent strategy.

I forgot to mention it when you first posted that one, but it's a fantastic stretch. I've done similar variations (ball of foot on wall, stretch on step with knee bent), but your way just hits the spot perfectly without overloading the knee.

adarqui

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Re: posture issues and athletic performance
« Reply #17 on: December 21, 2017, 06:07:52 pm »
0
If it's really bad it might take some time to fix. But in my experience the best way is long extended static stretches of around 2 minutes. Elevate the front half of one foot slightly (like on a book or something) and lunge forward until you feel a good stretch, and hold. If you have had a lot of ankle injuries you probably have scar tissue built up in there and it might take some time to work the range of motion back in.

Sounds like what I did with my soleus/ankle stretches during dishes, hah. I'd just ease into it and often hold it for a few minutes, while doing dishes. Definitely seemed to help quite a bit. Tried to find the photo I took, can't find it yet. For people with calf tightness/ankle mobility issues, it could be a decent strategy.

I forgot to mention it when you first posted that one, but it's a fantastic stretch. I've done similar variations (ball of foot on wall, stretch on step with knee bent), but your way just hits the spot perfectly without overloading the knee.

hah nice!!!

awesome man, glad it works for you. :highfive:

FP

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Re: posture issues and athletic performance
« Reply #18 on: April 18, 2018, 11:12:36 pm »
+1
https://www.posturalrestoration.com/the-science/basic-concepts-of-the-postural-restoration-institute

Something interesting I stumbled on while listening to one of Joel Smith's podcasts. Ive suspected that posture and breathing have significant relationship. This is some pretty innovative shit.

summary from a PT who took the course:
Quote
Postural Respiration is a course that is basically designed to show you the importance of a functional diaphragm and what happens with different kinetic chains in the body when you lose function of the diaphragm. (such an understatement)  There are different patterns that almost all peoples bodies will fall victim to in their life time, and PRI shows you  how to diagnose which pattern your body has chosen to take. They also provide treatment and exercise program to reverse the pattern.

from the PRI wwebsite"
Quote
dominant overuse of one side of the body can develop from other system unilateral overuse. For example, if the left smaller diaphragm is not held accountable for respiration as the right is, the body can become twisted. The right diaphragm is always in a better position for respiration, because of the liver’s structural support of the right larger diaphragm leaflet. Therefore, the left abdominals are always important to use during reciprocal function, such as walking, to keep the torso balanced.

Keeping the right chest opened during breathing is also challenging since there is no heart muscle inside the right side of the chest.

Quote
When these normal imbalances are not regulated by reciprocal function during walking, breathing or turning, a strong pattern emerges creating structural weaknesses, instabilities, and musculo-skeletal pain syndromes. Balancing muscle activity around the sacrum (pelvis), the sternum (thorax) and the sphenoid (middle of the head) through a PRI approach best positions multiple systems of the human body for appropriate integrated asymmetrical function.
« Last Edit: April 18, 2018, 11:15:52 pm by Final Phenom »

FP

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Re: posture issues and athletic performance
« Reply #19 on: June 23, 2018, 05:13:00 pm »
+4
have been seeing significant posture improvements, which i believe have come from throwing y-t-w's, reverse flys, and face pulls into my workouts every few days. i have not had to do a whole lot of actually trying to sit up straighter. the biggest improvement is when i am playing on the field, after doing some athletic movements my shoulders naturally just begin to drift back into good upper body posture. my neck still needs work though

LBSS

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Re: posture issues and athletic performance
« Reply #20 on: June 24, 2018, 03:50:29 am »
+1
have been seeing significant posture improvements, which i believe have come from throwing y-t-w's, reverse flys, and face pulls into my workouts every few days. i have not had to do a whole lot of actually trying to sit up straighter. the biggest improvement is when i am playing on the field, after doing some athletic movements my shoulders naturally just begin to drift back into good upper body posture. my neck still needs work though

 :headbang:
Muscles are nonsensical they have nothing to do with this bullshit.

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handstand + backflip + flag