Author Topic: Commonalities of High Level jumping athletes (single leg)  (Read 10158 times)

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creativelyric

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Re: Commonalities of High Level jumping athletes (single leg)
« Reply #30 on: April 22, 2012, 10:15:46 pm »
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Lance, what were the numbers of the single leg box squat when your athletes were doing them? I'm curious how strong they were in that movement, them being high level.

 170 lb male at 365 x 3 

 160 lb female at 315 x 2

Holy shit.

One of my profs had an olympic triple Jumper  that took 315 in the squat rack, unracked it  as if he was going to do a free squat, then proceeded to sit into a legal depth squat one ONE LEG, and with the trailing leg tucked up against his hip.  The balance required to do that alone would be insane.  He repped it a few times and racked it, never stumbled or strained once.

Ridiculous. Wish there was some footage, I'd love to see that.

nba8340

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Re: Commonalities of High Level jumping athletes (single leg)
« Reply #31 on: April 23, 2012, 12:15:02 am »
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where did you go to school lance, what did you study?

Is there a background or bio page on you somewhere in this forum?

LanceSTS

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Re: Commonalities of High Level jumping athletes (single leg)
« Reply #32 on: April 23, 2012, 12:37:09 am »
+1
where did you go to school lance




Quote
what did you study?

kinesiology

Quote
Is there a background or bio page on you somewhere in this forum?

yes, in the intro section.
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LanceSTS

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Re: Commonalities of High Level jumping athletes (single leg)
« Reply #33 on: April 23, 2012, 12:42:18 am »
0
Lance, what were the numbers of the single leg box squat when your athletes were doing them? I'm curious how strong they were in that movement, them being high level.

 170 lb male at 365 x 3 

 160 lb female at 315 x 2

Holy shit.

One of my profs had an olympic triple Jumper  that took 315 in the squat rack, unracked it  as if he was going to do a free squat, then proceeded to sit into a legal depth squat one ONE LEG, and with the trailing leg tucked up against his hip.  The balance required to do that alone would be insane.  He repped it a few times and racked it, never stumbled or strained once.

Ridiculous. Wish there was some footage, I'd love to see that.

 There is footage, we saw several tapes from the training compiled of each cycle up to the competition phase. I was fortunate to have her as a teacher as she was the assistant to the usatf team, and we got access to stuff we wouldve otherwise not seen.  Getting that footage to show here is next to impossible though, since it was over 10 years ago, and across the state :P.
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creativelyric

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Re: Commonalities of High Level jumping athletes (single leg)
« Reply #34 on: April 23, 2012, 12:57:25 am »
+1
Lance, what were the numbers of the single leg box squat when your athletes were doing them? I'm curious how strong they were in that movement, them being high level.

 170 lb male at 365 x 3 

 160 lb female at 315 x 2

Holy shit.

One of my profs had an olympic triple Jumper  that took 315 in the squat rack, unracked it  as if he was going to do a free squat, then proceeded to sit into a legal depth squat one ONE LEG, and with the trailing leg tucked up against his hip.  The balance required to do that alone would be insane.  He repped it a few times and racked it, never stumbled or strained once.

Ridiculous. Wish there was some footage, I'd love to see that.

 There is footage, we saw several tapes from the training compiled of each cycle up to the competition phase. I was fortunate to have her as a teacher as she was the assistant to the usatf team, and we got access to stuff we wouldve otherwise not seen.  Getting that footage to show here is next to impossible though, since it was over 10 years ago, and across the state :P.

Hah, too bad. Just the numbers themselves are mindblowing, I wonder how much more if you could see that on vid.

I still can't wrap my mind around the weight, really. Just shows you how strong you have to be to be elite. Definitely not just leverage and tendon length or what have you.

LanceSTS

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Re: Commonalities of High Level jumping athletes (single leg)
« Reply #35 on: April 23, 2012, 01:04:51 am »
+1
Lance, what were the numbers of the single leg box squat when your athletes were doing them? I'm curious how strong they were in that movement, them being high level.

 170 lb male at 365 x 3 

 160 lb female at 315 x 2

Holy shit.

One of my profs had an olympic triple Jumper  that took 315 in the squat rack, unracked it  as if he was going to do a free squat, then proceeded to sit into a legal depth squat one ONE LEG, and with the trailing leg tucked up against his hip.  The balance required to do that alone would be insane.  He repped it a few times and racked it, never stumbled or strained once.

Ridiculous. Wish there was some footage, I'd love to see that.

 There is footage, we saw several tapes from the training compiled of each cycle up to the competition phase. I was fortunate to have her as a teacher as she was the assistant to the usatf team, and we got access to stuff we wouldve otherwise not seen.  Getting that footage to show here is next to impossible though, since it was over 10 years ago, and across the state :P.

Hah, too bad. Just the numbers themselves are mindblowing, I wonder how much more if you could see that on vid.

I still can't wrap my mind around the weight, really. Just shows you how strong you have to be to be elite. Definitely not just leverage and tendon length or what have you.

Exactly, at that level EVERYONE has gifts, training makes or breaks the winners.  I will say that the guy doing the one leg squat with no support/box had VERY long tibia to femur ratios, making it easier to get the upper thigh to a parallel position. I dont think that exercise is mandatory at all, but it does give a glimpse into what kind of forces elites need to create off one leg, even on the strength end of the continuum.
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LanceSTS

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Re: Commonalities of High Level jumping athletes (single leg)
« Reply #36 on: June 01, 2012, 12:24:34 am »
+1


Insanely strong lower legs



  Typical programming would always include a very high volume lower intensity single and double leg hops, skips, and bounds.  This helps a ton, along with the work in the weight room.  Single leg eccentric, double leg concentric calf raises done on the standing calf machine are the single fastest way to bring up lower leg strength on the planet imo.

 The overload of a controlled eccentric on one leg, with a weight you are raising with two, really does the trick here,  but special attention to form must  be maintained.  I start with a 2 second eccentric on a 15 rm of the 2leg CR, and progress from there. Dont worry about going super low here, from slightly  below parallel, to the very, VERY TOP should be the primary focus.  This really helps athletes with poor dorsi to plantar flexion a lot.

  


"The good news about non-insertional tendinitis is that there is a new treatment protocol that has excellent success, even with some of the worst injuries. Referred to as heavy-load eccentric exercises, this treatment protocol involves placing a weighted backpack on your back while standing on the edge of a stair with your heels hanging off the stair. Using both legs, you raise your heels as high as possible, and then remove the uninjured leg from the stair. The injured leg is then gradually lowered through a full range of motion. The uninjured leg is then placed back on the stairway, and both legs are again used to raise the heels as high as possible. Three sets of 15 repetitions are performed twice a day with the knees both straight and bent. In a 12-week study of 15 recreational runners with chronic Achilles non-insertional tendinosis, Swedish researchers had a 100-percent success rate at treating this difficult injury6. The 100-percent success rate was impressive given that these were older athletes (average age 45) who had had symptoms for almost two years and had failed with every prior treatment protocol, such as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, orthotics and physical therapy."

http://www.takethemagicstep.com/coaching/families/health-management/managing-achilles-tendon-injuries/



sounds familiar....
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D4

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Re: Commonalities of High Level jumping athletes (single leg)
« Reply #37 on: June 01, 2012, 12:36:32 am »
+1
they stealing your stuff Lance hahahah
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LanceSTS

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Re: Commonalities of High Level jumping athletes (single leg)
« Reply #38 on: June 01, 2012, 12:59:43 am »
+1
they stealing your stuff Lance hahahah

hah, whats interesting is that their findings from across the world replicate what I have believed for years.  Implementing the 2leg concentric 1 leg eccentric calf raise work on the achilles tendon significantly, and thats exactly what Ive seen over and over.  Very little to no calf hypertrophy, with a significant rise in ankle stiffness and power, along with a great way to rehab ankle issues.

 I dont invent any of this stuff, its all been done way before me and my athletes.  What I do is keep the things that prove to work, and throw out the things that dont.
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