Author Topic: The Haskell Thread  (Read 3055 times)

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adarqui

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The Haskell Thread
« on: February 28, 2016, 08:55:20 pm »
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gbiuinpopokpokok



adarqui

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Re: The Haskell Thread
« Reply #3 on: June 29, 2016, 02:20:55 am »
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so impressive.. i've known about this for a while but, in case anyone else is interested. just crazy auto-generating all of that code for aws/google etc, really sick.

http://brendanhay.nz/amazonka-comprehensive-haskell-aws-client

adarqui

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Re: The Haskell Thread
« Reply #4 on: July 07, 2016, 02:59:06 pm »
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nice talk on Reflex (haskell ui framework).

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=92eXGvHFbzs" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=92eXGvHFbzs</a>

considering moving towards 100% haskell frontend & backend, instead of haskell on the back and purescript on the front.. so researching some haskell alternatives to purescript-halogen etc.

pc

Raptor

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Re: The Haskell Thread
« Reply #5 on: July 21, 2016, 06:18:18 am »
+1
What is Haskell most similar to?

nothing most programmers are familiar with. it's a different paradigm. it's in the functional programming language family, but also the ML style of languages, and it's purely functional, not just functional.

if you're familiar with languages like go, java, c, php etc, then learning haskell is almost like learning to program from scratch. If you use javascript in a "functional style" and obviously have experience with promises/callbacks/closures etc, then some of those things will transfer over to haskell's lambda's, maps/folds/functional operations on lists etc.

So where is Haskell used, what can you do with it?

adarqui

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Re: The Haskell Thread
« Reply #6 on: July 21, 2016, 10:31:41 pm »
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What is Haskell most similar to?

nothing most programmers are familiar with. it's a different paradigm. it's in the functional programming language family, but also the ML style of languages, and it's purely functional, not just functional.

if you're familiar with languages like go, java, c, php etc, then learning haskell is almost like learning to program from scratch. If you use javascript in a "functional style" and obviously have experience with promises/callbacks/closures etc, then some of those things will transfer over to haskell's lambda's, maps/folds/functional operations on lists etc.

So where is Haskell used, what can you do with it?

it's used in basically every industry now, but obviously not as much as more popular programming languages. Haskell use has sky rocketed in the last ~5 years. People are even writing full stack web apps in it now. Here's a list of companies using it as listed on their wiki:

https://wiki.haskell.org/Haskell_in_industry

There's much more than that.. but you can even see companies like Facebook etc starting to adopt it for various systems/tools within their organizations. https://code.facebook.com/posts/745068642270222/fighting-spam-with-haskell/

Typically it's been used in the financial industry and academic settings. But like I said before, it's being used in every way you can think right now.

This is one of my favorite companies which uses it:
- https://github.com/galoisinc

They do some really sick stuff.

As far as someone who has talked alot about how he actually uses it in the company he works for, Don Stewart claims a 1+ million line haskell code base that they use at Standard Chartered Bank. Here's his overflow: http://stackoverflow.com/users/83805/don-stewart

Right now i'm using it for the backend for the new forum.. I was using purescript for the frontend but, i've decided to go 100% full stack haskell.. so, i'm also writing the frontend in haskell now. We'll see how that goes. So far so good.

It has an incredibly steep learning curve but, i've had more fun & more success with this language than any other. At my previous job I wrote quite a few services in haskell that were used in production, they were extremely solid. Haskell programs take more brain power to design up front. You can't just code something and "hack away" at things by mutating state, irresponsibly using global variables, using pointers, etc.. So, these restrictions actually help you design/write safer & more maintainable programs, from my experience.

peace!

Raptor

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Re: The Haskell Thread
« Reply #7 on: July 22, 2016, 03:18:37 am »
+1
Would it be a good idea to invest into learning it, in the grand scheme of things? Right now I'm using Java/Java EE, with the idea of using it for Mobile Development (Android). That market should continue to grow like crazy, however Oracle has been messing around with Java for quite a while. I know you're not exactly a big Java fan, but it's a very intuitive language, to me. It just makes more sense than other languages.

PS. Looked for jobs here in Romania that specified knowing Haskell. There are none :ninja:
« Last Edit: July 22, 2016, 03:28:19 am by Raptor »

adarqui

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Re: The Haskell Thread
« Reply #8 on: July 22, 2016, 06:19:03 am »
+1
Would it be a good idea to invest into learning it, in the grand scheme of things? Right now I'm using Java/Java EE, with the idea of using it for Mobile Development (Android). That market should continue to grow like crazy, however Oracle has been messing around with Java for quite a while.

i don't advise anyone invest heavily in learning haskell until they've messed around with it 'experimentally' for quite a while.. just toying around with the various Data.List, Data.Map, Data.Graph modules etc. That'll give you an idea whether or not you will like it. Most people get drawn in right away.. it's a totally different paradigm than what they are used too. It will most likely blow your mind, in a good way. And like you mentioned below, if you invest in learning haskell with the intent of using it for work, that is very risky because there aren't a ton of jobs and the learning curve is very large. I think it's definitely a language that one should eventually mess around with and learn some of the basic concepts.

If you look into it, "Learn you a haskell" is one of the best initial resources (free online book). And you can use things like http://tryhaskell.org to mess with it online.. just plugging some of the stuff in from the first few chapters of 'learn you a haskell' is pretty fun.



Quote
I know you're not exactly a big Java fan, but it's a very intuitive language, to me. It just makes more sense than other languages.

it's not that i'm not a big fan .. i just prefer other languages much more. ie, golang & haskell.

java is definitely a foundational language like I mentioned earlier (for C). look at all of the really impressive languages built on top of the JVM, scala for example.



Quote
PS. Looked for jobs here in Romania that specified knowing Haskell. There are none :ninja:

exactly.. that's the biggest problem.

definitely keep the focus on languages that are more widely adopted and have more job opportunities.. but learning something very slowly on the side (like haskell or ocaml) can be very beneficial.

pc!!

Raptor

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Re: The Haskell Thread
« Reply #9 on: July 22, 2016, 06:37:16 am »
+1
Absolutely. Had some incursions with Python, but the course from MIT was very difficult, and barely got it with 57% (the lowest for a certificate was 55%). Granted, lost a lot of time doing other stuff so I had to compress my time learning it and it became exponentially difficult.