Author Topic: Dreyth's New Journal  (Read 192617 times)

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Dreyth

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Re: Dreyth's New Journal
« Reply #1485 on: November 19, 2021, 04:05:49 pm »
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I just started the KOTG program. How are you liking it?

saw some improvement for a little, and then not much else. been too lazy to keep up with it.

i need to start back up again. my main gripe about the program is that there is barely ANYTHING to target glute med weakness in there. lots of knee problems stem from a weak glute med.

im planning on finding a decent physical therapist in my area for a full assessment. it's just hard finding one who is very competent and isnt working at a money machine mill full of old people doing cookie cutter exercises

likewise i didnt notice a single TFL stretch in the program. tight/overactive TFLs is another cause of knee pain. i feel knee pain relief immediately after doing a decent TFL stretch, but only by about 50%. still great though
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FP

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Re: Dreyth's New Journal
« Reply #1486 on: November 19, 2021, 10:06:16 pm »
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I just started the KOTG program. How are you liking it?

saw some improvement for a little, and then not much else. been too lazy to keep up with it.

i need to start back up again. my main gripe about the program is that there is barely ANYTHING to target glute med weakness in there. lots of knee problems stem from a weak glute med.

im planning on finding a decent physical therapist in my area for a full assessment. it's just hard finding one who is very competent and isnt working at a money machine mill full of old people doing cookie cutter exercises

likewise i didnt notice a single TFL stretch in the program. tight/overactive TFLs is another cause of knee pain. i feel knee pain relief immediately after doing a decent TFL stretch, but only by about 50%. still great though

It's cool that this came up in your log, I just today realized that my glute medius wasn't activating on my sprints in my left leg. I have had some injuries on that leg for years prior - a groin strain that may have been a labrum tear that i never quite recovered from as well as a pretty severe PCL tear that all may have to do with bad motor patterns.
I've been figuring out all this stuff over time in my log but my squatting pattern had some kind of dysfunction between knee and ankle where they were moving in different planes: ankles collapsing outwards and weight not distributed across my entire foot (but only on the anterior ball), also causing some arch dysfunction in my foot.The glute med when squatting I'm pretty sure pulls the tibia (*femur) so its moving in one plane of motion (and groin flexibility is required to maintain that movement into a deep squat), so all these years when i was squatting i built up bad patterns where for part of the movement the glute med was inactive, and that carried over to sprinting.
Hmm on further consideration I have also historically been unable to get full dorsiflexion in my ankle on that leg, that probably has something to do with it as well. Sorry this was kind of ranty and personal to me but felt on topic

Edit: i just figured it out ! Apparently i have more dorsiflexion ROM in the ankle when i evert the foot, and i thought i needed this extra ROM to deep squat. But doing that throws it out of alignment with the rest of the leg and might be what is disconnecting the glute med and causing it not to fire.

Yo and that also could be why louie simmons teaches wide stance box squat, because its impossible for your foot to evert and glute med/min have to fire to maintain wide stance throughout

Nvm glute med and min pull the femur mostly up not to the side  :derp: might change as you move deeper into a squat or whatever movement though
« Last Edit: November 20, 2021, 04:28:22 pm by FP »

Dreyth

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Re: Dreyth's New Journal
« Reply #1487 on: November 26, 2021, 05:59:05 pm »
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Another thing to keep in mind:

Sometimes a muscle will be overactive NOT due to another muscle being overstretched, but due to stability issues instead. If you don't have decent hip stability you may experience mobility/flexibility restriction. Why?

The CNS/proprioception basically prevents you from reaching a certain ROM (though your muscles are flexible enough for it) because it will put you deep into instability. As a result you'll have other muscles being hypertonal (overractive) because they are working overtime to keep you stable. To fix this, work on your stability where it' slacking, and the ROM immediately improves after that.

Dean Somerset has some good info on this.
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FP

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Re: Dreyth's New Journal
« Reply #1488 on: November 27, 2021, 11:49:20 pm »
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Yeah dude totally, i have found this true for hips, i had this period where i would stretch my hams pnf every day multiple times a day but my flexibility only improved a little bit. It was at least partially because my hip/core area i never took steps to stabilize when sitting, walking and doing all that stuff. And in team sports we would always do these dumb stretches like frankensteins, turtle herders and toe touches which all cue lower back flexibility in addition to hamstrings and dont reflect good motor patterns. And if the hips arent being kept stable by forces then its dangerous to put hamstrings in compromising stretched positions. But now that i have been addressing hip stability by not allowing lower back collapse when sitting or allowing too much sway in the hips when walking my hams are at their most flexible even though i only stretch them maybe like once a week. Probably is true for hip flexors as well but thats a little harder to measure

I do think that with shoulders (maybe because of the extent of my previous upper cross) i still have to do a lot of rolling and some stretching to get them into a position where they can even have the capacity to be stable. Im still not quite there, i can get into that position during athletic movement or by consciously activating ext rotators and rhomboids but my shoulders arent at the point where they are in those positions without active correction which is where i think they hopefully will be eventually. Also maybe i havent been addressing the neck enough and its pulling the shoulders back into bad positions

FP

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Re: Dreyth's New Journal
« Reply #1489 on: November 28, 2021, 10:48:03 pm »
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Yo i just had a pretty big breakthrough and you were entirely right man. I pulled my neck back into a stable position and my shoulders just kind of went with it. I had been putting so much work in trying to pull them back and was making small gradual progress, but as soon as i pulled the neck back (although the position the neck is in right now is a little stiff, im not used to it) the shoulders just naturally readjusted with no effort on my part. Needed to deal with the stability first.