Author Topic: Ball-Handling Programs  (Read 12067 times)

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Jard

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Re: Ball-Handling Programs
« Reply #30 on: August 01, 2011, 03:51:54 am »
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unless you are a 12 year old learning the game, do NOT do stationary basketball drills other then a QUICK warmup.
i call complete bullshit.

I don't call complete BS, but it's definitely not a very wise statement. Stationary drills can be extremely helpful to kids/players of all ages. It just has to be the right kind of stationary work. It's all about difficulty and throwing in an added element to the work. There's literally thousands of variations of drills that are stationary and helpful to all ages.

Co-sign.
I still implement stationairy ball handling drills for about 20 minutes daily. It's not even about the variations, more-so about intensity. Most pound dribbles are a great way to improve ballhandling imo.

LanceSTS

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Re: Ball-Handling Programs
« Reply #31 on: August 01, 2011, 04:25:14 am »
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 Stationary dribbling drills are fine but they shouldnt be the bulk of your training, not even close.  The goal of putting the ball on the floor is to GET SOME FUCKING WHERE.  The best ball handlers can cover massive court with very few dribbles.  Get inside the arc and its even more important to make sure every time you put the ball on the floor your going somewhere.

 Most the kids now days are standing in place playing with themselves trying to look like hot sauce while posts are wide open, the lane is closing, and end up getting ripped or no where.  Being able to attack with the dribble is an extremely important part of the game, but the key to being good at it is GETTING SOMEWHERE when you put the ball on the floor.
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LanceSTS

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Re: Ball-Handling Programs
« Reply #32 on: August 01, 2011, 01:16:17 pm »
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watch iverson, after he crosses, spins, etc., count the dribbles to the goal.  Hes behind the the three point line and takes one to two dribbles to get all the way to the goal in many of those clips.  Thats getting somewhere with the dribble.  The hardest guys to defend are the ones who can cover massive ground with very few dribbles, its easy to stay with someone playing with ball in place.




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clintzyc24

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Re: Ball-Handling Programs
« Reply #33 on: August 01, 2011, 03:06:04 pm »
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This is an article that talks about if stationary ball handling drills are waste of time.
http://www.breakthroughbasketball.com/blog/index.php/does-stationary-ball-handling-waste-valuable-practice-time/

D4

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Re: Ball-Handling Programs
« Reply #34 on: August 01, 2011, 03:27:02 pm »
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Lessson:  stationary drills help and should be used, BUT make movement drills the primary focus. 
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JelloPuddinPup

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Re: Ball-Handling Programs
« Reply #35 on: August 01, 2011, 06:08:41 pm »
+1
I guess I didn't mention this before so my philosophy isn't really clear.

There is a difference in what I consider ball-handling drills and what you guys probably consider ball-handling drills.

I'm going to guess most people lump and kind of dribbling practice into ball-handling drills.

But what I was talking about and what I teach my kids are that ball-handling drills are (stationary, and 2-3 step drills w/ the ball), then I teach my kids that dribble-drive moves are (used on the go, or to break down a man 1-on-1 or in the open court or in the key under heavy pressure and defense).

I was only talking about ball-handling drills before and assumed that's what he meant. But I think he may have been asking more for what I consider dribble-drive moves. There's a completely different mentality when training these two different styles of dribbling.
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LanceSTS

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Re: Ball-Handling Programs
« Reply #36 on: August 01, 2011, 11:12:03 pm »
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This is an article that talks about if stationary ball handling drills are waste of time.
http://www.breakthroughbasketball.com/blog/index.php/does-stationary-ball-handling-waste-valuable-practice-time/

nice article, sums it up well.
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LanceSTS

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Re: Ball-Handling Programs
« Reply #37 on: August 01, 2011, 11:12:45 pm »
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Lessson:  stationary drills help and should be used, BUT make movement drills the primary focus. 

^ exactly
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Jard

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Re: Ball-Handling Programs
« Reply #38 on: August 02, 2011, 05:01:55 am »
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I guess I didn't mention this before so my philosophy isn't really clear.

There is a difference in what I consider ball-handling drills and what you guys probably consider ball-handling drills.

I'm going to guess most people lump and kind of dribbling practice into ball-handling drills.

But what I was talking about and what I teach my kids are that ball-handling drills are (stationary, and 2-3 step drills w/ the ball), then I teach my kids that dribble-drive moves are (used on the go, or to break down a man 1-on-1 or in the open court or in the key under heavy pressure and defense).

I was only talking about ball-handling drills before and assumed that's what he meant. But I think he may have been asking more for what I consider dribble-drive moves. There's a completely different mentality when training these two different styles of dribbling.

Exactly.

The drills I perform stationairy are usually moves and include footwork or a specific task (pounding hard, getting the crossover tighter, getting shoulders to move, keeping back straight, landing on the balls of the foot, stepping forward not sideways etc).
I have noticed a huge difference when applying these myself because I can really focus on a couple of these aspects before performing the moves, on the move. In my experience, not doing these drills stationairy first, will make for a less effective on-the-move drill, plus you get a lot of reps in short ammount of time doing them stationairy.
This is ofcourse, only when trying to learn of perfect a move you have not mastered yet.

Not sure if they fit the mold of strict stationairy drills though as the player does move back/forth (pivot stays though), def don't advice figure 8's etc.