Author Topic: Heat Studies  (Read 733 times)

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adarqui

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Heat Studies
« on: March 02, 2019, 07:53:42 pm »
+1
heat shock proteins

https://www.outsideonline.com/2098556/surprising-benefits-training-heat

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Researchers have been looking at the effects of heat on athletic performance for decades, and their results have been consistently surprising. Studies have found that, in addition to an increased rate of perspiration, training in the heat can increase an athlete’s blood plasma volume (which leads to better cardiovascular fitness), reduce overall core temperature, reduce blood lactate, increase skeletal muscle force, and, counterintuitively, make a person train better in cold temperatures. In fact, heat acclimation may actually be more beneficial than altitude training in eliciting positive physiological adaptations, says Santiago Lorenzo, a professor of physiology at Lake Erie College of Osteopathic Medicine and a former decathlete at the University of Oregon. “Heat acclimation provides more substantial environmental specific improvements in aerobic performance than altitude acclimation,” he says. And in contrast to the live low, train high philosophy, we more quickly adapt to heat stress than we do to hypoxia. In other words, heat training not only does a better job at increasing V02 max than altitude, but it also makes athletes better at withstanding a wider range of temperatures.

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A 2011 study by a group of researchers in New Zealand also found that overall volume of blood plasma increased at a greater rate when athletes did not drink water during exercise. While some coaches are carefully experimenting with dehydration, Minson and Lorenzo are not because it adds too much additional stress. However, they do say that this type of training can be beneficial because it produces a higher number of “heat shock” protein cells.

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2. Koop most commonly recommends that his athletes use a dry sauna immediately after running. “It doesn’t impact training nearly as much as running in the heat, and the effects are similarly positive,” he says. He often tells his athletes to not drink water during these sessions to enhance the effect. Koop recommends spending 20-to-30-minutes in the sauna, depending on tolerance.

3. Koop says that when he has his athletes exercise in the heat—either naturally or by wearing extra clothing to simulate the experience—it will be on a long, slow day for 60 to 90 minutes. The time completely depends on the athlete’s tolerance and previous experience. But he stresses to not do this on a recovery day, because heat training is an added stress on the body. Koop recommends drinking 30 to 40 ounces of an electrolyte drink per hour during these sessions  And for safety, he advises using low-traffic sidewalks and bike paths—not trails.

maxent

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Re: Heat Studies
« Reply #1 on: March 03, 2019, 12:43:58 am »
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Wasnt there a study or paper claiming injury rates go up with temperature? So training this way may be harmful
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adarqui

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Re: Heat Studies
« Reply #2 on: March 03, 2019, 11:03:34 pm »
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Wasnt there a study or paper claiming injury rates go up with temperature? So training this way may be harmful

dno, don't remember that.

training light in the heat doesn't sound to risky to me. using the heat to make the effort harder, while actually going at lower intensities, seems safe for the body. definitely seems less safe when it comes to the heart, could get very stressful. but using good judgement is important. lots of dangerous symptoms will manifest themselves early (sensitivity to bright light/sunlight, feeling cold, etc).

pc!

Dreyth

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Re: Heat Studies
« Reply #3 on: March 28, 2019, 10:41:35 am »
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This is some cool stuff I never would have thought could be a thing

also seems refreshing because i feel like i haven't come across any new beneficial sports science in so long
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adarqui

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Re: Heat Studies
« Reply #4 on: March 28, 2019, 10:20:33 pm »
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This is some cool stuff I never would have thought could be a thing

yup. i've seen it work first hand.

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also seems refreshing because i feel like i haven't come across any new beneficial sports science in so long

hah cool.

harnessing nature is always where it's at.

maxent

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Re: Heat Studies
« Reply #5 on: March 28, 2019, 10:42:44 pm »
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Was skimming thru Bagett's 2nd edition of VJB and he mentions lactic acid helping to increase stiffness, which obviously contributes to athleticism. So maybe all these years i skipped cardio (running etc) i missed out on athletic benefits. Most ppl get them from playing sport (as Kelly suggests). Interesting?
Training for sub 20 5K & 40" RVJ & 170kg BS @ 85kg bw. log entry template