Author Topic: Pain from plyometrics  (Read 2284 times)

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D4

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Pain from plyometrics
« on: August 07, 2011, 09:02:29 am »
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My plyometric routine consists of sprints/ single leg bounds/ depth jumps/ pogos

Lately, I have been doing them at a high frequency.  Weird thing is, the following days, my back is super sore, and my obliques as well.  I did feel my obliques working hard during my sprints though, and my lats a little bit from the arm swinging during the sprints.  How the hell is my back so much more sore than when I do a weight lifting for volume day on my back?

Could this possibly mean, I have weak obliques or something?  Would strengthening them help my sprints somehow?  Or nothing to worry about?

Also, my INNER shins start hurting a lot.  It's like they absorb a lot of the impact on each landing.  I don't think doing dorsiflex exercises would help, because they work the outside of the shins.  It's the inner side and they hurt...

Anyone ever experience any of these things and know what's up?
Goal is to dunk.

Vertical needed to dunk: 40"

Current vertical : 38.5"

Raptor

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Re: Pain from plyometrics
« Reply #1 on: August 07, 2011, 09:54:59 am »
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On what surface do you do your plyos on? If it's different than what you're usually using for jumping, then that difference in elasticity/surface compliance CAN generate splint shins. For example, if you do plyos on track mat and jumping on plywood then they will have different compliance levels and will generate different loads/different inflammation stimuli.

D4

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Re: Pain from plyometrics
« Reply #2 on: August 07, 2011, 10:43:31 am »
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sometimes i do it on indoor bball gyms, sometimes outdoor turf/grass.  i did plyos last 3 days.  1st day indoor was fine.  2nd day turf was fine but started feeling it during pogos.  3rd day = death. 

my back was going nuts from the morning after my first plyo session tho. 
Goal is to dunk.

Vertical needed to dunk: 40"

Current vertical : 38.5"

TKXII

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Re: Pain from plyometrics
« Reply #3 on: August 07, 2011, 10:23:29 pm »
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What part of your back..?

I've had sore traps and upperback from bounding before but only if I took a long break from it.

For shins I recommend drop jumps (depth drops rather, altitude drops, w/e). Worked for me once so i think it can work not sure if it's the best advice but try it. I get shin pain sometimes from one footed VJs, also this may be due to excessive quad action so the tibia gets the blunt of it rather than the hips
"Performance during stretch-shortening cycle exercise is influenced by the visco-elastic properties of the muscle-tendon units. During stretching of an activated muscle, mechanical energy is absorbed in the tendon structures (tendon and aponeurosis) and this energy can subsequently be re-utilized if shortening of the muscle immediately follows the stretching. According to Biscotti (2000), 72% of the elastic energy restitution action comes from tendons, 28% - from contractile elements of muscles.

http://www.verkhoshansky.com/Portals/0/Presentations/Shock%20Method%20Plyometrics.pdf

D4

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Re: Pain from plyometrics
« Reply #4 on: August 08, 2011, 09:21:35 am »
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What part of your back..?

I've had sore traps and upperback from bounding before but only if I took a long break from it.

For shins I recommend drop jumps (depth drops rather, altitude drops, w/e). Worked for me once so i think it can work not sure if it's the best advice but try it. I get shin pain sometimes from one footed VJs, also this may be due to excessive quad action so the tibia gets the blunt of it rather than the hips


Same as me bro, traps and upper back is super sore.  I did take a plyo break for like 2 months before starting just this week though.  So yeah, I did take a big break.
Goal is to dunk.

Vertical needed to dunk: 40"

Current vertical : 38.5"

TKXII

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Re: Pain from plyometrics
« Reply #5 on: August 12, 2011, 11:09:11 am »
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Nice okay,

I notice that I build some muscle in my inner pecs after a bounding session, that arm swing is quite a powerful one during bounds.

When I first started training single leg VJ, my shin would hurt and  I couldn't use any speed in my approach. So I think greater stress would need to be placed on the bones, maybe 1 footed stair jumps too those hit that area well without as much eccentric forces.
"Performance during stretch-shortening cycle exercise is influenced by the visco-elastic properties of the muscle-tendon units. During stretching of an activated muscle, mechanical energy is absorbed in the tendon structures (tendon and aponeurosis) and this energy can subsequently be re-utilized if shortening of the muscle immediately follows the stretching. According to Biscotti (2000), 72% of the elastic energy restitution action comes from tendons, 28% - from contractile elements of muscles.

http://www.verkhoshansky.com/Portals/0/Presentations/Shock%20Method%20Plyometrics.pdf