Author Topic: Vibration Training  (Read 2383 times)

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adarqui

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Vibration Training
« on: June 09, 2009, 12:11:55 am »
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All conclusions of studies will be listed in this original post (TABLE OF SUMMARIES) for quick reference.

Post anything related to vibration training.


1. Effects of Whole Body Vibration Training on Muscle Strength and Sprint Performance in Sprint-trained Athletes

http://www.powerplate.fr/etudes/Delecluse_EffectsWBVStengthSprint.pdf

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In conclusion, the main findings of this study showed that 5 weeks of WBV training by means of this specific protocol did not improve knee-extensor and knee-flexor strength, knee-extension velocity, jump performance, force-time characteristic of the start action or sprint running velocity, when the WBV training was performed prior to conventional training sessions in sprint-trained athletes. It is suggested that the intensity and volume of the specific WBV protocol may not be high enough for these highly-trained athletes. Further research is necessary to demonstrate and to investigate the potential role of WBV in the training of sprint-trained athletes.




2. Effects of vibration and resistance training on neuromuscular and hormonal measures

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We conclude that combined WBV and CRT (CONVENTIONAL RESISTANCE TRAINING) did not additionally increase MVC and mechanical performance compared with CRT alone. Furthermore, WBV (WHOLE BODY VIBRATION TRAINING) alone did not increase MVC and mechanical performance in spite of increased GH.



3. COMPARING THE EFFECTS OF VARIOUS WHOLE-BODY VIBRATION ACCELERATIONS ON COUNTER-MOVEMENT JUMP PERFORMANCE

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Men, however, did not experience performance enhancing effects following any of the vibration sessions. While significant differences did not occur between time in either gender, the effects of the 45 sec WBV session in women were transient, lasting approximately five minutes. During the prescription of WBV, gender should be considered given that the results of this study seem to indicate that men and women respond differently to WBV. The results of this study suggest that WBV might be a useful modality as applied during the pre-competition warm-up.

adarqui

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Re: Vibration Training
« Reply #1 on: June 09, 2009, 12:14:58 am »
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Effects of vibration and resistance training on neuromuscular and hormonal measures

Abstract  The aim was to study whether whole body vibration (WBV) combined with conventional resistance training (CRT) induces a higher increase in neuromuscular and hormonal measures compared with CRT or WBV, respectively. Twenty-eight young men were randomized in three groups; squat only (S), combination of WBV and squat (S+V) and WBV only (V). S+V performed six sets with eight repetitions with corresponding eight repetition maximum (RM) loads on the vibrating platform, whereas S and V performed the same protocol without WBV and resistance, respectively. Maximal isometric voluntary contraction (MVC) with electromyography (EMG) measurements during leg press, counter movement jump (CMJ) measures (mechanical performance) including jump height, mean power (P  mean), peak power (P  peak) and velocity at P  peak (V  ppeak) and acute hormonal responses to training sessions were measured before and after a 9-week training period. ANOVA showed no significant changes between the three groups after training in any neuromuscular variable measured [except P  mean, S higher than V (P<0.05)]. However, applying t tests within each group revealed that MVC increased in S and S+V after training (P<0.05). Jump height, P  mean and P  peak increased only in S, concomitantly with increased V  ppeak in all groups (P<0.05). Testosterone increased during training sessions in S and S+V (P<0.05). Growth hormone (GH) increased in all groups but S+V showed higher responses than S and V (P<0.05). Cortisol increased only in S+V (P<0.05). We conclude that combined WBV and CRT did not additionally increase MVC and mechanical performance compared with CRT alone. Furthermore, WBV alone did not increase MVC and mechanical performance in spite of increased GH.







COMPARING THE EFFECTS OF VARIOUS WHOLE-BODY VIBRATION ACCELERATIONS ON COUNTER-MOVEMENT JUMP PERFORMANCE

While it seems that whole body vibration (WBV) might be an effective modality to enhance physical performance, the proper prescription of WBV for performance enhancement remains unknown. The purpose of this study was to compare the immediate effect of various WBV accelerations on counter movement jump (CMJ) height, the duration of any effect, and differences between men and women. Forty-four participants (33 men, 11 women) participated in no less than four CMJ familiarization sessions and completed all vibration sessions. Participants performed a pre-test (three maximal CMJs), followed randomly by one of five WBV accelerations; 1g (no-WBV control), 2.16g, 2.80g, 4.87g, and 5.83g. Participants performed three maximal CMJs immediately, five, and 10 minutes following each 45 sec WBV session. The mean of the three performances was used and calculated as a percentage of the pre-vibration mean value. A Repeated Measures Analysis of Variance (ANOVA; acceleration x time x gender) model was used to analyze the data. The two-way interactions of acceleration-gender (p = 0.033) and time-gender (p = 0.050) were significant. Women performed significantly better following the 2.80g (p = 0.0064) and 5.83g (p = 0. 0125) WBV sessions compared to the 1g (control) session. Men, however, did not experience performance enhancing effects following any of the vibration sessions. While significant differences did not occur between time in either gender, the effects of the 45 sec WBV session in women were transient, lasting approximately five minutes. During the prescription of WBV, gender should be considered given that the results of this study seem to indicate that men and women respond differently to WBV. The results of this study suggest that WBV might be a useful modality as applied during the pre-competition warm-up.