Author Topic: Recovery from quadricep tendonitis  (Read 41795 times)

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jumperer

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Re: Recovery from quadricep tendonitis
« Reply #90 on: April 19, 2016, 06:13:31 pm »
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the only advice i can give with respect to the relative distance of your steps is that each additional step you add to your approach should add height to the jump. so start with one step. if the first step doesn't add any height relative to your SVJ, practice it and mess with technique until it does. then add another step and mess with technique until two steps is consistently higher than one. et cetera. whatever relative length of steps you end up with will be specific to you, and pretty well greased, like adarq said.

i never approach from more than four steps away because i can't seem to get any additional power out of the fifth step. although now that i think about it i haven't tried in a long time. might do that this week, just to see.

we call this the T0ddday method.

Yea that sounds good. All the dunkers on youtube, I see they all take 4/5 steps on their approach. Currently, I think I jump my highest off 2/3 steps, any more and it kinda becomes a mess.

jumperer

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Re: Recovery from quadricep tendonitis
« Reply #91 on: April 20, 2016, 01:19:53 am »
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So starting from scratch today, reconstructing my jump. Just one step approaches, trying to make my step as long as possible and use more of my hips. Just doing miniball dunks and 2 hand rim grabs on 10. Hope to sort out my approach before getting back to dunking on 9'6 with an actual ball.

LBSS

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Re: Recovery from quadricep tendonitis
« Reply #92 on: April 20, 2016, 02:11:55 pm »
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i wouldn't try to make your step as long as possible. i'd just focus on getting as high as possible and use that as your only cue. if a longer step gets you higher, then great. but maybe the longest step possible is less optimal than a slightly shorter one. mess around, the only rule is height.
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jumperer

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Re: Recovery from quadricep tendonitis
« Reply #93 on: April 21, 2016, 05:02:24 am »
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i wouldn't try to make your step as long as possible. i'd just focus on getting as high as possible and use that as your only cue. if a longer step gets you higher, then great. but maybe the longest step possible is less optimal than a slightly shorter one. mess around, the only rule is height.

Ok, sounds good, and the most practical lol. I still wanna be more hip dominant due to my "bad" left knee though. Guess I just gotta keep foam rolling and stretching my quads, and keep doing deadlifts.

jumperer

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Re: Recovery from quadricep tendonitis
« Reply #94 on: April 25, 2016, 11:20:48 pm »
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Do you guys think conventional or sumo deadlifts are better for glutes and hamstrings? I've never done sumo, so I can't comment on it. Conventional though, I know that you can be more quad dominant by having your knees more forward at the start of the lift, I think the term is "squatting the weight up".

Raptor

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Re: Recovery from quadricep tendonitis
« Reply #95 on: April 26, 2016, 03:10:45 am »
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Do RDLs, where only the hips are moving back and forth (the movement of the hips lowers and raises the bar). That way you know you're doing them right. If you can raise or lower the bar without the hips going front or back, then you're pulling with your back, so you know you're doing a wrong movement. If the bar moves, the hips must move.

jumperer

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Re: Recovery from quadricep tendonitis
« Reply #96 on: April 26, 2016, 05:09:22 am »
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Oh yea, I've been doing RDL's too, but more of an accessory exercise with higher reps. Also do leg curls after, really need to balance out the quadricep-hamstring ratio. I guess I'll try out some sumo's next session. If I feel it too much in my quads or they even bother my knee, I guess ill switch back to conventional deadlifting.

jumperer

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Re: Recovery from quadricep tendonitis
« Reply #97 on: May 05, 2016, 01:18:58 am »
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i wouldn't try to make your step as long as possible. i'd just focus on getting as high as possible and use that as your only cue. if a longer step gets you higher, then great. but maybe the longest step possible is less optimal than a slightly shorter one. mess around, the only rule is height.

Yea, I've now learned that it's not necessary to take a long a step as you can. I jump higher with a shorter pentultimate, but I feel it more in my quads. I guess that's okay as long as I keep working hard on my hamstrings and glutes. So my lower body workout now is deadlift 3x5, romanian deadlift 3x8-12, and then leg curls 3x8-12. Plenty of hamstring work to compensate for my overdeveloped quads.

Raptor

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Re: Recovery from quadricep tendonitis
« Reply #98 on: May 05, 2016, 02:35:56 am »
+1
Speaking of the penultimate step:

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6eW0qMfGzb0" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6eW0qMfGzb0</a>

Also:

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IIty_hMMopA" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IIty_hMMopA</a>
« Last Edit: May 05, 2016, 02:59:28 am by Raptor »

jumperer

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Re: Recovery from quadricep tendonitis
« Reply #99 on: May 07, 2016, 11:51:51 pm »
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I see, wonder what difference it makes for trying to jump as high as you can compared to jumping as far as you can.

jumperer

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Re: Recovery from quadricep tendonitis
« Reply #100 on: May 08, 2016, 01:47:38 am »
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Also, I wonder if I'll ever be able to have jump/dunk sessions off one foot again. All I know is that being quad dominant and trying to change into a one foot jumper more than a year ago messed up my knee.

jumperer

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Re: Recovery from quadricep tendonitis
« Reply #101 on: May 10, 2016, 04:03:03 am »
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Do RDLs, where only the hips are moving back and forth (the movement of the hips lowers and raises the bar). That way you know you're doing them right. If you can raise or lower the bar without the hips going front or back, then you're pulling with your back, so you know you're doing a wrong movement. If the bar moves, the hips must move.

What do you think about single leg RDL's?

Raptor

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Re: Recovery from quadricep tendonitis
« Reply #102 on: May 10, 2016, 04:13:35 am »
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Used them in the past. However, when you do them, the middle of the bar is displaced from the middle of the moving leg so to speak... and that is sometimes bad for your back. The bar sits in the middle of your body, whereas you're moving with either your left or right leg and sometimes that's problematic.

jumperer

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Re: Recovery from quadricep tendonitis
« Reply #103 on: May 11, 2016, 06:23:01 am »
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Used them in the past. However, when you do them, the middle of the bar is displaced from the middle of the moving leg so to speak... and that is sometimes bad for your back. The bar sits in the middle of your body, whereas you're moving with either your left or right leg and sometimes that's problematic.

Don't you instead just center the bar over the leg you're working with?

Raptor

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Re: Recovery from quadricep tendonitis
« Reply #104 on: May 11, 2016, 06:30:54 am »
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I did that too. That lead to back pain because you would "twist" yourself to accomodate for that placement. This is true when you do them with a barbell.

You can try to do them with a dumbbell, contralaterally - left leg, dumbbell in right hand.