Author Topic: Sprint Videos  (Read 21938 times)

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Joe

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Re: Sprint Videos
« Reply #30 on: September 24, 2013, 12:03:33 pm »
+1
^^^true, true. reminds me of the gladwell-popularized fact that most NHL players are born in the first third of the year. the theory goes that kids born earlier in the year tend to be older for their grade or division than kids born later in the year. the 9 or 10 months can make a big difference when you're little, so early-birthday kids are overselected for competitive teams because they're just bigger and stronger and more coordinated than kids younger than they are. path dependency takes over and the relatively younger kids never make up the gap.

or so i comfort my november-born, always-one-of-the-youngest-kids-in-the-class self.

I'm going to make sure my kid gets held back in kindergarten
"i threaten to kill myself whenever my parnets tell me to get a job" - bjpenn

Mutumbo000

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Re: Sprint Videos
« Reply #31 on: September 24, 2013, 12:06:21 pm »
0
^^^true, true. reminds me of the gladwell-popularized fact that most NHL players are born in the first third of the year. the theory goes that kids born earlier in the year tend to be older for their grade or division than kids born later in the year. the 9 or 10 months can make a big difference when you're little, so early-birthday kids are overselected for competitive teams because they're just bigger and stronger and more coordinated than kids younger than they are. path dependency takes over and the relatively younger kids never make up the gap.

or so i comfort my november-born, always-one-of-the-youngest-kids-in-the-class self.

Yeah I'm born in October so I was always playing against the older kids. In basketball it was always beneficial for me when I was in 2nd year of my age group because playing with older guys made me a better player than the majority of the 1st years who were coming up as 1st years even though they were born only Jan/Feb 1991 instead of Oct 1990. The downside to it was that I was playing district in U14s already by the time I was 11 while I had friends who were 10 and born in April still playing district as 2nd year U10s or 1st year U12s. 
I was lucky in athletics though because the cut off was actually September (just before the season starts) so I was always the oldest in my age group, which was beneficial for me. I think they've changed it back to January for age groups but at that time it was September.
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LBSS

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Re: Sprint Videos
« Reply #32 on: September 24, 2013, 01:33:28 pm »
0
^^^true, true. reminds me of the gladwell-popularized fact that most NHL players are born in the first third of the year. the theory goes that kids born earlier in the year tend to be older for their grade or division than kids born later in the year. the 9 or 10 months can make a big difference when you're little, so early-birthday kids are overselected for competitive teams because they're just bigger and stronger and more coordinated than kids younger than they are. path dependency takes over and the relatively younger kids never make up the gap.

or so i comfort my november-born, always-one-of-the-youngest-kids-in-the-class self.

I'm going to make sure my kid gets held back in kindergarten

yeah i mean on the one hand i always felt extra smart and awesome being the youngest. on the other hand, being among the older kids has huge advantages and not just for sports. my parents just decided i was ready for kindergarten when i was four, and that was that.
Muscles are nonsensical they have nothing to do with this bullshit.

- Avishek

sunday: long very easy run 80+ mins @ 5:40+ (14+ km)
monday: strength/cross training
tuesday: easy run 60+ mins @ 5:20-5:30 (11+ km)
wednesday: fartlek (mostly easy pace with mix of strides, hills, long tempo) 45 mins (8+ km)
thursday: easy run 60+ mins @ 5:20-5:30 (11+ km), strength/cross-training
friday: rest
saturday: short tempo 6-8x500 @ sub-4:00 (7 km)

strength would be:
- hops 2x10
- box jumps or ME SVJ 2x5
- squats 3x6-8 or weighted BSS/lunges 3x10/leg
- RDL/hypers 2x10-12 or SLRDL 2x10-12/leg
- upper push myo-reps or sets to technical failure
- upper pull myo-reps or sets to technical failure
- leg raises, holds, pallof presses

T0ddday

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Re: Sprint Videos
« Reply #33 on: September 25, 2013, 04:30:22 am »
0

Genetics certainly comes down to it no doubt. However, there are parts of the video that I agree with. Go to any junior development program throughout the world and they'll focus on the best athletes at that age judged upon their times or their height at the time. I seen it growing up in basketball. Guys that weren't even that good and were tall only coz they had hit puberty a few years before everybody else. You could see they had facial hair and were solidly built already and they were still only 12 and 13. 5 years later they're tweeners when their whole life since U10 they've been touted as Australia's next best Centre. The trouble with these programs is that they regurgitate the same players year after year so if you're not in the state team by U12 by U18 it's still going to be pretty much the same team as it was in U12 because coaches have already invested so much time and resources into these players they don't want to let them go. By the time these players are in state league they've given up on basketball or they are out playing D2 or D3. 
Of the guys I know from my state that are playing professional basketball atm none of them were in a state team except Yan who played state since U16s as a bench player. 2 of the starters of the state team every year in that cohort from U10 to state league don't even play basketball anymore. In contrast you've got a guy like Adam Doyle who couldn't even play in D1 in juniors let alone a state team, yet now he's a development player in the NBL. With guys like Adam who persist with the sport sometimes it pays off but a lot of the time it won't, and the players end up quitting basketball and playing footy or just quitting sports altogether.


This is a good point when it comes to a weird sport like basketball where athleticism is semi-important and height is essential...   However, the only effect of most other sports is that players who could be very good don't get enough focus on them which deprives them of hitting their potential.  This doesn't cause a program to lose out on athletes who could actually be great.  Great athletes don't miss the cut cause they were born in November.  I grew up with Nate Robinson.  That guy was stronger and more explosive than all of us and the kids who were three and four years older than him from the time he was about 7 years old.   He was also straight up fearless.   The point is a really great athlete will still be good enough to shine at the junior level against athletes with "false advantages" liked advanced height cause they grew sooner.   In a sport like basketball this is a lot more important when a really talented kid might get written off despite his skill because he is "too frail" but in track or a sport like American football you WILL shine despite age/height disadvantages if you are a world class talent. 


Usain Bolt is a freak. He could coach himself and he'd still be a world class athlete. I got a lot more respect for coaches like Charlie Francis and Stephen Francis who take guys like Ben Johnson and Asafa Powell from being mediocre sprinters to world class athletes. In terms of Jamaican sprint success it also comes down to culture. Track is their number 1 sport so their are a lot more opportunities for talent to be exposed. Even cricket is big in Jamaica and that's initially what Usain Bolt wanted to be- a cricket player. However, he wasn't that good at it and his coach obviously saw his raw speed so pointed him in the direction of track.


This Stephen Francis story of taking Asafa Powell from mediocre to world class is REALLY overblown.  Asafa Powell's entire family is fast.   His brother was already a world class sprinter by the time Powell was "discovered" and his Mom is probably faster than most people here.  Sure there is the story of him running 11.4 or something in high-school.  But from what I have heard he essentially got encouraged to sprint by his brother and grudgingly ran for one of his first times and didn't really know how to use blocks but was able to stand up and chase a fair amount of the kids down.  Recognizing that the kid might have some potential when they run 11.4 into a headwind without really training or knowing what they are doing isn't exactly rocket science.   Asafa Powell wasn't discovered before he had developed, he just didn't really know how to run!


Who knows if Usain was a great cricketer when he was younger maybe he wouldn't of even pursued sprinting. Personally I think USA has a lot more sprinting talent than Jamaica does it just doesn't get expressed because people there are playing other sports or are too busy being gangsters.

Really... we are the ones too busy being gangsters????  Jamaicas murder rate in 2005 was 58/100k (almost all gang related gun-violence) the murder rate in the US hasn't been higher than 5/100k since pre 2000.   I think Jamaicans spend A LOT more time being gangsters than Americans. 



West African countries like Sierra Leone, Mali, Liberia, and Senegal are going to be the next big talents in sprinting once they overcome poverty and civil wars in their countries. I think the point about the track and resources was also one about making the most of what you've got. Those West African countries I just mentioned have populations less than 10 million but all have National Records in the 10.0s and 10.1s. Imagine if the majority of their populations weren't living a struggle to survive, soccer wasn't their national sport, and they also had the access to  physios, doctors, sport scientists and exercise physiologists etc.

I don't think we will find out in the near future because overcoming poverty doesn't look like it's going to happen too fast.  But, I'd rather know what the 100th fastest runner is doing than the fastest if I was going to judge the countries potential.  I assume your suggesting that they have a genetic advantage.  Possible but as Jamaica has shown, culture is number 1 when it comes to sports.   Only Jamaica and a few other west indian countries really focus on track as a national sport.  That will always be number one. 

Mutumbo000

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Re: Sprint Videos
« Reply #34 on: September 25, 2013, 07:56:38 am »
+1
In individual sports you can shine out or in sports that are predominantly based upon athleticism e.g American Football. However, most sports around the world are team sports and athleticism doesn't really play as big a part as skill does. Don't get me wrong if you have 2 guys with equal skill than athleticism will most likely be the deciding factor. Although, take sports that are globally popular like soccer, rugby, cricket etc. In all of those sports there are all development pathways. If you don't get in the development pathway early it becomes really hard to cement a spot later on in life. If you're a freak like that American ex-track athlete who runs 100 in 10.13 FAT or whatever than you might get an opportunity to play rugby 7s or whatever later on in life based of your potential. Yet 99% of players are never going to have outstanding athleticism like that so they depend on the pathways and the system to get into professional sport. Thus, being born later in a year is going to be a disadvantage in comparison to being born earlier in the year.
Another huge factor that gets neglected in team sports is the players you have around you. If you're surrounded by good players and playing in a winning team you're always going to stand out better than you would playing in a team of less talented players. E.g you're a striker in soccer. You could be a brilliant striker but if you're playing in a bottom team you're not getting as many opportunities to score goals as you would if you were playing in a stronger team.

The Aussies on this forum could also attest to the fact that lately there's been a lot of mature age AFL players getting recruited. Everybody in the public and the commentators all question how these players couldn't possibly have been spotted earlier on. Yet like I just explained it's easy for talented players to go through their sporting life unspotted if they're not in the development system. You can have all the talent scouts in the world but if those talent scouts are only checking out the top teams or players in the top leagues than there's always going to be a few diamonds in the rough that slip through un-noticed until they persevere long enough with their sports to shine and eventually pick up spots in feeder leagues to get noticed.

As far as an untrained 11.4 goes I wouldn't say it would turn heads. If the coaches knew about his brothers and family than they would give him a shot and think he's probably got a lot of untapped potential. But if you went to a track meet and just saw somebody running 11.4 for the first time you're not going to think that they are ever going to run 9.7s one day. In comparison the first time Australia's fastest man Patrick Johnson ever competed he ran 10.49! He went on to run 9.93. Like you've said before some athletes peak when they're 18 others peak when they're 35 it's impossible to tell when somebody is going to be at their best.

Well USA has 300 million people and say 10% of them descend from West African roots. That's still 30 million. The laws of probability favours there being more talent in the USA than Jamaica. Aside from culture,  the other factor to consider with USA is that it's not the best environment for track. The southern states like Cali, Florida, and Texas are a production line for elite and world class sprinters. Go up North to places like Chicago, New York, Baltimore etc. you're not going to get the track times because of the conditions- cold, wet and snow.  Geographically Jamaica has better weather conditions for track than the majority of the USA does.

Edit- That's what I like about track though. It's objective. Sure you're racing against other people but at the end of the day if you're a recreational athlete than it just comes down to you against the clock.
« Last Edit: September 25, 2013, 08:08:21 am by Mutumbo000 »
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LBSS

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Re: Sprint Videos
« Reply #35 on: September 25, 2013, 10:20:08 am »
0
^^^that. the same goes for something like baseball, where the coaching you get and the level of play around you has a HUGE impact on how well you develop. i have a friend who saw five kids in his high school class get drafted by MLB teams. is that because peabody, massachusetts has an unusually high number of freakishly talented baseball players? no, it's because all the boys play baseball and the athletic kids are funneled to baseball and coached very well from a young age. they won the babe ruth league world series when my buddy was 14. and when the initial selection is going on, the kids who are ahead developmentally have an advantage. that's not to say that some younger kids don't eventually rise to the top, or even that some younger kids aren't always obviously more athletic (viz. nate robinson). but it is to say that, in aggregate, relatively older kids have an advantage.

don't take my word for it, go check out the various pieces the science of sport guys have done on this over the years:

http://www.sportsscientists.com/2009/01/matthew-effect.html

http://www.sportsscientists.com/2013/02/long-term-athlete-development.html

also, one other point: i think that, even for "pure" sports like track and field or swimming, it's actually not that interesting to look at people like asafa, bolt, michael phelps, etc. they are true freaks and it's hard to extrapolate anything from them. how many guys have run 9.7? like, six? but dozens have run 10.0 and hundreds have run 10.3, which is still an elite time! i feel like you can learn much more interesting to look at the broader picture of elite athletes.
« Last Edit: September 25, 2013, 10:23:29 am by LBSS »
Muscles are nonsensical they have nothing to do with this bullshit.

- Avishek

sunday: long very easy run 80+ mins @ 5:40+ (14+ km)
monday: strength/cross training
tuesday: easy run 60+ mins @ 5:20-5:30 (11+ km)
wednesday: fartlek (mostly easy pace with mix of strides, hills, long tempo) 45 mins (8+ km)
thursday: easy run 60+ mins @ 5:20-5:30 (11+ km), strength/cross-training
friday: rest
saturday: short tempo 6-8x500 @ sub-4:00 (7 km)

strength would be:
- hops 2x10
- box jumps or ME SVJ 2x5
- squats 3x6-8 or weighted BSS/lunges 3x10/leg
- RDL/hypers 2x10-12 or SLRDL 2x10-12/leg
- upper push myo-reps or sets to technical failure
- upper pull myo-reps or sets to technical failure
- leg raises, holds, pallof presses

T0ddday

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Re: Sprint Videos
« Reply #36 on: September 25, 2013, 04:53:57 pm »
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I agree wtih what your saying especially for a sport like Rugby or AFL.  I don't know those sports too well but from what it seems they don't seem to be as obsessed with measurables like bench/squat/40yd as American football and they seem to have a strong component of team oriented success.  So if your on a really bad rugby team and your not extremely fast you might not look very good if your on a poor team....

As far as an untrained 11.4 goes I wouldn't say it would turn heads. If the coaches knew about his brothers and family than they would give him a shot and think he's probably got a lot of untapped potential. But if you went to a track meet and just saw somebody running 11.4 for the first time you're not going to think that they are ever going to run 9.7s one day. In comparison the first time Australia's fastest man Patrick Johnson ever competed he ran 10.49! He went on to run 9.93. Like you've said before some athletes peak when they're 18 others peak when they're 35 it's impossible to tell when somebody is going to be at their best.

I think it really all depends on the 11.4  Patrick Johnson's first time competing surely wasn't his first time running... That's a big difference.  It really depends on the story you believe but from what I heard Asafa wasn't really a sportsman much at all.... He was just into cars and was essentially a chubby untrained kid who ran an 11.4.   That IS impressive.  Sure, I guess some coaches would assume if you aren't sub 11 as a 18 year old you have no chance so I guess Stephen Francis deserves some credit for identifying talent...   But given the mitigating circumstances around the performance AND his family background I don't think that it was a huge as a leap to assume he might have observed a talented sprinter as the stories claim.   


Well USA has 300 million people and say 10% of them descend from West African roots. That's still 30 million. The laws of probability favours there being more talent in the USA than Jamaica. Aside from culture,  the other factor to consider with USA is that it's not the best environment for track. The southern states like Cali, Florida, and Texas are a production line for elite and world class sprinters. Go up North to places like Chicago, New York, Baltimore etc. you're not going to get the track times because of the conditions- cold, wet and snow.  Geographically Jamaica has better weather conditions for track than the majority of the USA does.
Edit- That's what I like about track though. It's objective. Sure you're racing against other people but at the end of the day if you're a recreational athlete than it just comes down to you against the clock.

I believe it's a bit short-sighted to think that West-African roots are a prerequisite for sprinting talent.   The law of statistical genetics favors that you don't have evidence that West-African roots are cause sprinting success.   Additionally, you can't argue that genetics are so important and then claim that the US has 30 million people with the same genetic predisposition as Jamaicans.   Jamaica is a tiny island populated rapidly during a short period of the slave trade.  The founder effect suggests that it's easily possible for Jamacians to have a distinct genetic advantage against African-Americans.  Personally, I think the genetic advantage is overblown.  Australias own fastest man is about the farthest you can be from genetically similar to Jamaicans!   From a scientists perspective I can tell you that there really isn't any evidence for any genetic difference which confers an advantage specific to sprinting or athleticism that has been observed in West African populations.  There are of course trends, most europeans tend to have shorter limbs and larger thoracic cavities relative to their height than most africans.   But these are general differences and their are numerous exceptions on both sides...  I think when you live in Los Angeles for a day and go to any urban track after 6pm in the school year and see about 200 kids ages 4 literally running till they are sick with a coach yelling in their face.... And not one kid is white... You appreciate just how much culture matters.






Mutumbo000

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Re: Sprint Videos
« Reply #37 on: September 26, 2013, 01:04:48 am »
0
As far as Patrick Johnson times.
That's a transcript from 2003
http://www.abc.net.au/austory/content/2003/s933058.htm

In 2013 he had a long interview talking about his life. Skip to 22.21 minutes where he starts talking about when he first started sprinting.
http://www.abc.net.au/local/stories/2013/08/28/3835543.htm

Given his longevity in the sport it certainly makes sense that he was able to sprint until his late 30s at a competitive level because his training age didn't match his chronological age.
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_pZPNTroJf0" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_pZPNTroJf0</a>

I'll concede that Asafa Powell was definitely a lot more talented than his time suggests especially if he was chubby. Throw in a favourable wind and that 11.4 could've easily been an 11.2. I also agree with you that the genetic factor is overblown. It takes time and patience as well as hard work, dedication, and a little luck to make it sprinting. Luck in the sense of avoiding injuries and peaking at the right times. Talent alone just isn't enough.
 
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T0ddday

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Re: Sprint Videos
« Reply #38 on: September 26, 2013, 03:51:56 am »
0
Interesting on the Patrick Johnson story.  I find it a little hard to believe to be totally honest.  In some ways the story seems to suggest he was truly green, didn't know how to use blocks or spikes and ran a 10.47.  If that's true.... well then I can only say his coach surely doesn't deserve any awards.  I honestly can't see how someone who doesn't run can only record a PB of 0.5 seconds after years of training when compared to their first race.   Was the first race accurately timed?   People who truly don't run don't have enough speed endurance for the 100m.  They ACTUALLY get tired toward the end of the race.   The story talks about him racing people since he was 13 years old.... Just how "new" was he?   In Asafas case he was actually somewhat of a chubby geeky kid, rather than an athlete who just hadn't yet sprinted in an official capacity.  Either way I have always been in awe of Patrick Johnson, truly a great athlete.  His wikipedia page curiously lists him as the oldest man to run under under 10 seconds....  Despite the fact that Linford Christie did it while two years older than him in 1992 and 37 year old Kim Collins just did it recently.... I won't change it though.

Mutumbo000

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Re: Sprint Videos
« Reply #39 on: September 26, 2013, 04:48:57 am »
0
Interesting on the Patrick Johnson story.  I find it a little hard to believe to be totally honest.  In some ways the story seems to suggest he was truly green, didn't know how to use blocks or spikes and ran a 10.47.  If that's true.... well then I can only say his coach surely doesn't deserve any awards.  I honestly can't see how someone who doesn't run can only record a PB of 0.5 seconds after years of training when compared to their first race.   Was the first race accurately timed?   People who truly don't run don't have enough speed endurance for the 100m.  They ACTUALLY get tired toward the end of the race.   The story talks about him racing people since he was 13 years old.... Just how "new" was he?   In Asafas case he was actually somewhat of a chubby geeky kid, rather than an athlete who just hadn't yet sprinted in an official capacity.  Either way I have always been in awe of Patrick Johnson, truly a great athlete.  His wikipedia page curiously lists him as the oldest man to run under under 10 seconds....  Despite the fact that Linford Christie did it while two years older than him in 1992 and 37 year old Kim Collins just did it recently.... I won't change it though.

I was talking to my cousin who has a PB of 10.08 and he still runs 10.2s at 32 years of age. His dream was to play rugby but despite his speed he never made it into the NRL or any professional leagues. Anyway I asked him how fast he was when he started sprinting again and he said he was running around 10.7s/10.8s electronic at 21. My cousin did do athletics when he was younger but not that seriously and his main focus was always on rugby league until about 19. I know another guy who has a PB of 10.50 he's 25 now. He has state records for 100m in U16- 10.85 and U18- 10.62. The other state record holder that I've mentioned on here before is this Asian guy called Derek who has a 100m PB of 10.84 and his state U14 record for 100m is 11.53. The best juniors don't always turn into the best sprinters, which is what that whole video was suggesting. Also it's a lot easier to improve from say 13-12 seconds than it is from 12-11. It than becomes a whole lot more difficult to improve from 11-10.5, let alone 10.5-sub 10.
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T0ddday

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Re: Sprint Videos
« Reply #40 on: September 26, 2013, 08:31:31 am »
0

I was talking to my cousin who has a PB of 10.08 and he still runs 10.2s at 32 years of age. His dream was to play rugby but despite his speed he never made it into the NRL or any professional leagues. Anyway I asked him how fast he was when he started sprinting again and he said he was running around 10.7s/10.8s electronic at 21. My cousin did do athletics when he was younger but not that seriously and his main focus was always on rugby league until about 19. I know another guy who has a PB of 10.50 he's 25 now. He has state records for 100m in U16- 10.85 and U18- 10.62. The other state record holder that I've mentioned on here before is this Asian guy called Derek who has a 100m PB of 10.84 and his state U14 record for 100m is 11.53. The best juniors don't always turn into the best sprinters, which is what that whole video was suggesting. Also it's a lot easier to improve from say 13-12 seconds than it is from 12-11. It than becomes a whole lot more difficult to improve from 11-10.5, let alone 10.5-sub 10.

First:

Totally agree.  11-10.5 is about 10000x easier than 10.5 to 10.0 and not just because 10.0 is obviously done by a much smaller fraction of the population but because of the mechanics of running in a fluid atmosphere.   Improving your bench from 200 to 300 is obviously easier than from 300 to 400 but not to the degree that 11-10.5 is easier than 10.5 to 10.0 because as your run faster and faster the degree to which you have to battle wind resistance goes up with respect to the square of your velocity.  That's the main reason Usain Bolt is only to run 1 second faster [~10% improvement, ~ 12% improvement in top speed ] than a low-class athlete like myself even though he is far greater.  Bolt spends much much more of his energy just battling drag; if the race were in a vacuum he would be something closer to 40% faster (I've course I would be beating his old PR so I wouldn't complain). 

That drag factor is really important to remember when we compare ourselves to elite sprinters.  The start of course complicates analysis as well but if we just compare our top speed I think we can roughly (and pretty roughly) approximate our ability by multiplying our percent deficit by about 2-8 to figure out where we are off.  I think this also falls in line with other sports performances.   For example the world record in the clean and jerk for 200lb is like 510lb.  10% off or about 460lb is IMO much more impressive than 10% off the worlds best top speed [ a hundred meter time of about 10.4-10.8 depending on start/SE].   

Second:

Despite that.....  While juniors don't often see huge improvements in sprinting and converted American football players and the like don't always see huge improvements....  The untrained ALWAYS do.   That's why I think it's really important to distinguish between a fast junior and a fast untrained time.   For comparison just think of the 400m.   Everyone but 400m sprinters are essentially untrained in the 400m.   That's why you might find an unexperienced sprinter who has a background in American football who runs 10.x but doesn't get that much better when he focuses on sprinting.... but you will always get much faster in the 400m.   It's why I argue that Patrick Johnsons first race was the equivalent of a fast junior time where Asafa Powells was more similar to an untrained sprint.   That said I agree totally that fast juniors don't always turn into great sprinters BUT unlike what the video was suggesting... SLOW juniors never do.   Asafa was a relatively slow untrained but not a slow junior IMO.

 I also think that what the video suggests as genius isn't necessarily a closely guarded trade secret... any decent coach knows the basics of evaluating talent and potential not just the coaches at MVP.   Essentially there are a few reasons fast juniors don't became even faster senior level runners.  The first is simply that they are stupid/unmotivated and don't continue to work hard.  The second is that their speed comes at very ideal strength to weight ratios (the main manipulable characteristic).   If I have three juniors who all run 10.5 but one is visibly chubby, one is lanky and non-muscular and one is muscular and lean.....  The chubby one will be the best ( simply dropping fat weight is ALWAYS the easiest way to improve all relative strength tests - sprinting/jumping etc), the lanky one will be the next best (adding muscle will improve his strength to weight ratios which usually translates into improved times) and the muscular lean one will be able to improve the least.   I know this.  And I'm not a great coach.   

*** Note I really really back of the enveloped those calculations.  Like back of the back of the back of the envelope.   I had worked out the physics of it once but I don't know exactly where I had the results.  The point is that drag makes sprinting faster and faster much harder than lifting more and more weight.... It is really fun to try and quantify the expected difference ( I said 2-8x because running is not just top speed and the figure changes depending on your speed ) and I think it's a useful exercise to appreciate sprinting speed of the greats.   It's also why I suggest people running for general fitness run the 400m.  There are SO many more pathways to improvement which is really rewarding.  If you are not experienced in the 400m you really can take your time down easily by 10-15 seconds which is a HUGE margin and much more than 4x the margin you could improve in the 100m.
« Last Edit: September 26, 2013, 08:36:00 am by T0ddday »

LBSS

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Re: Sprint Videos
« Reply #41 on: September 26, 2013, 08:37:24 am »
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how about slow seniors?  :trolldance:
Muscles are nonsensical they have nothing to do with this bullshit.

- Avishek

sunday: long very easy run 80+ mins @ 5:40+ (14+ km)
monday: strength/cross training
tuesday: easy run 60+ mins @ 5:20-5:30 (11+ km)
wednesday: fartlek (mostly easy pace with mix of strides, hills, long tempo) 45 mins (8+ km)
thursday: easy run 60+ mins @ 5:20-5:30 (11+ km), strength/cross-training
friday: rest
saturday: short tempo 6-8x500 @ sub-4:00 (7 km)

strength would be:
- hops 2x10
- box jumps or ME SVJ 2x5
- squats 3x6-8 or weighted BSS/lunges 3x10/leg
- RDL/hypers 2x10-12 or SLRDL 2x10-12/leg
- upper push myo-reps or sets to technical failure
- upper pull myo-reps or sets to technical failure
- leg raises, holds, pallof presses

Mutumbo000

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Re: Sprint Videos
« Reply #42 on: September 26, 2013, 09:27:06 am »
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Since this thread has kind of turned into a discussion on development there's actually a competition going on in Australia atm called the Athletics Allstars. Basically it's a search for Australia's Fastest Man but it's also based upon potential because the aim is they want the sponsorship winner to compete in the 2016 Olympics Final.
http://www.athleticallstars.com.au/category/athletic-allstars.html
https://www.facebook.com/athleticallstars
http://www.youtube.com/user/AthleticAllstars

But yeah basically it's come down to 3 sprinters-
Tim Leathart
Andrew McCabe
Jarrod Geddes

This video talks about the 3-
https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?v=611924525525932&set=vb.172900612761661&type=2&theater

I honestly wouldn't know which one to pick to sponsor. Geddes is the youngest and lankiest but he's also been training since he was very young. Andrew McCabe is a hard worker and quality 200m runner but he's already pretty built and doesn't have the acceleration for 100m. If it's about 100m I wouldn't pick him. Leathart is the oldest but he's also come along way in the past couple of years progressing from 10.93 PR in 2009 to 10.24 in 2013. Although he's older his training age probably isn't that much higher than Geddes so it's an interesting one.
"IMO, It didn't happen if it's not on vid/official"- adarqui

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Mutumbo000

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Re: Sprint Videos
« Reply #43 on: September 30, 2013, 10:57:02 am »
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<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OKMa_wWH4LU" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OKMa_wWH4LU</a>
"IMO, It didn't happen if it's not on vid/official"- adarqui

It's easier to keep up than it is to catch up...

Mutumbo000

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Re: Sprint Videos
« Reply #44 on: October 13, 2013, 10:45:22 am »
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<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2Y3eNKi3mFw" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2Y3eNKi3mFw</a>
"IMO, It didn't happen if it's not on vid/official"- adarqui

It's easier to keep up than it is to catch up...