Author Topic: Lower back injuries and olympic lifts  (Read 2894 times)

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Raptor

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Lower back injuries and olympic lifts
« on: July 21, 2011, 09:02:52 am »
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Since I injured my back doing hang powersnatches with an empty barbell (same symptoms came back - high buttock pain (probably piriformis) and pain in that area while bending down as in a standing hamstring stretch and lightning bolts through the back etc) - but probably was about to happen before that but nevertheless - it happened during the hang powersnatch.

ANYWAY

The question was - if you tend to use the lower back while o-lifting, what can you do to use more glute and get the spinal erectors out of the equation? (except not arching that much)

steven-miller

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Re: Lower back injuries and olympic lifts
« Reply #1 on: July 21, 2011, 10:31:21 am »
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I told you several times, but I say it again: You cannot extend your hip with your lower back muscles unless your anatomy is different from everybody else. Just make sure to do a valsalva and keep that spine rigid and your glutes will do work. That work will increase with increasing resistance as well.

I have no experience with your injury though, so I cannot help you with that unfortunately. But it probably is unrelated to your imagined problems regarding you extending your hips with your lower back. Are you sure that you are actually injured?

Raptor

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Re: Lower back injuries and olympic lifts
« Reply #2 on: July 21, 2011, 10:50:28 am »
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Yup, I am. And whatever happens (maybe more piriformis gets used in a movement he has no business with) is happening again and again and traps the sciatic nerve underneath it. Apparently, for some people, the sciatic nerve actually GOES THROUGH the piriformis and if the piriformis hypertrophies it can trap the nerve and cause all kinds of problems.

LBSS

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Re: Lower back injuries and olympic lifts
« Reply #3 on: July 21, 2011, 10:56:23 am »
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@steven-miller: surely you have seen countless people in the gym doing dead lifts, power cleans and power snatches that are really more like standing back extensions, sometimes with a flourish (the latter two). maybe i've got a biased sample because i go to a crossfit-happy gym and some of the form there is just, well, it's just awful.

of course your low back muscles can't extend your hips, but they sure can take your upper body from parallel to the ground to perpendicular.
Muscles are nonsensical they have nothing to do with this bullshit.

- Avishek

handstand + backflip + flag

steven-miller

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Re: Lower back injuries and olympic lifts
« Reply #4 on: July 21, 2011, 11:06:56 am »
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@steven-miller: surely you have seen countless people in the gym doing dead lifts, power cleans and power snatches that are really more like standing back extensions, sometimes with a flourish (the latter two). maybe i've got a biased sample because i go to a crossfit-happy gym and some of the form there is just, well, it's just awful.

of course your low back muscles can't extend your hips, but they sure can take your upper body from parallel to the ground to perpendicular.

Yes, but that does not happen if you start with your spine in lumbar and thoracic extension and keep it that way. That is the case sometimes and people still think they are lifting "with their back" whenever their torso is not completely vertical to the floor. Raptor keeps bringing this up and phrasing it in a way that suggests that he thinks the muscles of the lumbar spine can hip extend, something that many people actually believe.

LBSS

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Re: Lower back injuries and olympic lifts
« Reply #5 on: July 21, 2011, 11:29:19 am »
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fair enough
Muscles are nonsensical they have nothing to do with this bullshit.

- Avishek

handstand + backflip + flag

Raptor

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Re: Lower back injuries and olympic lifts
« Reply #6 on: July 21, 2011, 01:20:12 pm »
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of course your low back muscles can't extend your hips, but they sure can take your upper body from parallel to the ground to perpendicular.

How do you call that? "Hip parallel-to-perpendicular-extension"? Or just good ol' plain "hip extension"?

Because that's what I'm doing whenever I PC or PS. I just do what I usually do in a deadlift, I don't really hip extend because, frankly, I think my ultra-stiff hip flexors stop this from happening.

steven-miller

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Re: Lower back injuries and olympic lifts
« Reply #7 on: July 21, 2011, 02:13:17 pm »
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of course your low back muscles can't extend your hips, but they sure can take your upper body from parallel to the ground to perpendicular.

How do you call that? "Hip parallel-to-perpendicular-extension"? Or just good ol' plain "hip extension"?

Because that's what I'm doing whenever I PC or PS. I just do what I usually do in a deadlift, I don't really hip extend because, frankly, I think my ultra-stiff hip flexors stop this from happening.

@LBSS: I think you can see in the above example what I am talking about....

Raptor

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Re: Lower back injuries and olympic lifts
« Reply #8 on: July 21, 2011, 02:42:59 pm »
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By the way, discovered something else:

If I point my feet A LOT to the sides then I can bend forward without much pain if at all in the buttock. If I have my feet oriented forward, then the pain is pretty severe at the top of my left buttock. I think this is consistent with the piriformis syndrome.

Now this is something to keep in mind while squatting - it appears that if I have a narrow stance and the feet are not oriented to the sides at least a for a bit (or more) then bad things will happen. I'm writing this because other people might experience the same thing and they didn't discovered it.

PS. And seriously, that's a back extension.