Author Topic: Random Strength and Conditioning Posts/Articles/Info That I Like  (Read 10408 times)

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LanceSTS

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Random Strength and Conditioning Posts/Articles/Info That I Like
« on: February 02, 2011, 03:16:35 am »
+2
  Glenn Pendlay, EXCELLENT progression into full snatch. 

http://www.californiastrength.com/olwete.html


  The first and second videos, of the high hang position into snatch, is very very beneficial to athletes, especially jumping athletes, without having to get into much technical difficulty at all.
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LanceSTS

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Re: Random Strength and Conditioning Posts/Articles/Info That I Like
« Reply #1 on: February 02, 2011, 03:19:13 am »
0
 Great squat by Donny Shankle, one of his athletes.

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j_ki721pSso" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j_ki721pSso</a>

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BMully

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Re: Random Strength and Conditioning Posts/Articles/Info That I Like
« Reply #2 on: February 02, 2011, 05:08:36 am »
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This was the most beneficial thing I have ever seen. My oly lifts are drastically going to change

I cannot thank you enough lance!!!

Raptor

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Re: Random Strength and Conditioning Posts/Articles/Info That I Like
« Reply #3 on: February 02, 2011, 08:58:12 am »
0
  Glenn Pendlay, EXCELLENT progression into full snatch. 

http://www.californiastrength.com/olwete.html


  The first and second videos, of the high hang position into snatch, is very very beneficial to athletes, especially jumping athletes, without having to get into much technical difficulty at all.

Oh boy, these are GOLD! :highfive:


Nightfly

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Re: Random Strength and Conditioning Posts/Articles/Info That I Like
« Reply #5 on: February 02, 2011, 11:55:07 am »
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Great find. Very helpful  :strong:

tychver

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Re: Random Strength and Conditioning Posts/Articles/Info That I Like
« Reply #6 on: February 02, 2011, 04:03:31 pm »
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  Glenn Pendlay, EXCELLENT progression into full snatch. 

http://www.californiastrength.com/olwete.html


  The first and second videos, of the high hang position into snatch, is very very beneficial to athletes, especially jumping athletes, without having to get into much technical difficulty at all.

Yeah that's a great resource for learning proper technique.

LanceSTS

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Re: Random Strength and Conditioning Posts/Articles/Info That I Like
« Reply #7 on: February 02, 2011, 10:55:14 pm »
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 Glad you guys like the videos, Pendlay has a great way of breaking things down in the lifts and structuring progressions that are effective and simple.
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LanceSTS

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Re: Random Strength and Conditioning Posts/Articles/Info That I Like
« Reply #8 on: February 23, 2011, 03:49:23 am »
+2
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Raptor

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Re: Random Strength and Conditioning Posts/Articles/Info That I Like
« Reply #9 on: February 23, 2011, 06:07:35 am »
+1
Interesting, indeed. It's similar to a MSEM, with the exception that MSEM is much lower in volume usually and it's geared towards heavy weights.

LanceSTS

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Re: Random Strength and Conditioning Posts/Articles/Info That I Like
« Reply #10 on: February 23, 2011, 04:23:38 pm »
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Interesting, indeed. It's similar to a MSEM, with the exception that MSEM is much lower in volume usually and it's geared towards heavy weights.

Well its kind of similar but different overall goals, its VERY similar to the rest pause/dc style training, but still different in its own ways.  One of the best things about myo reps, rest pause, etc. is the work you get in the range that is so beneficial to progress and hypertrophy, and how easy it is to make constant progress in your training. 

  I use myo reps alot, even with relatively green trainees, when they are on the verge of a plateau, to be able to break their previous set/rep pr.  Beginners make great linear progress with 3x5, 4x8, etc., but many times, when the 3x5/etc. plateaus, I will add a couple of myo-rep style reps at the end of their last set, which still gives them a pr and some very beneficial extra work.  The more seasoned the athlete the more they tend to benefit from this style of training in my experience, beginners dont need to use these techniques nearly as frequently but they can still have their place in their training if used at the right times. 

  The thing that matters most over time is progressive resistance, beating your previous best.  Using this type of training can enable a higher training frequency if the volume of exercises and total sets are kept in check, progress is much easier ( instead of having 3x5 to beat a certain load/# you now have one extended set via rest pause/ myo-reps, which can be manipulated either by more load or more reps, and a single set using these principles can be enough to stimulate great strength and hypertrophy increases.)

  I use rest pause sets and workouts very similar to what you are using now on your upper body days and some of my best progress has been made using these methods, even though I have been training for several years.  For example, say you have a previous best on military press of 185x7, 5, and 3, for a total of 15 rest paused reps. The next time you perform that exercise with 185, you end up with still 15-16 rest paused reps, you can easily take a short myo-rep style pause, and perform one or two more reps to break the previous pr.  Many times this will be enough to push you over that hump and the next time that particular exercise comes around in your training, you are able to break your previous 3 rest pause set record in 3 rest paused sets, convincingly.  There are about 1000 different ways to incorporate it into your training but those are just a few examples.
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Raptor

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Re: Random Strength and Conditioning Posts/Articles/Info That I Like
« Reply #11 on: February 23, 2011, 06:08:45 pm »
0
So for a squat myo-workout, you would to stuff like 80%, 8-10 +14 (8-10 +2+2+2+2+2+2+2), and for all these +2s, you'd keep the bar on your back, not re-rack it and unrack it back, right? You only put the bar back at the "fatigue stop", right? So after you reach the 10th rep, you wait say 10-20 seconds with the bar still on your back, do 2 more reps, wait some more with the bar on the back, do another 2 reps etc?

All these +2+2+2 is in reality one grueling long set of reps or you actually, like you said for fatigue stop, rack the bar back when the speed starts to drop? (I think that's the case).

If it's so, then it should be illustrated like this:

80%, 8-10 +2+2
+2+2
+2
+2
+2 etc

For each bar rack there should be a separation as a different set.

IN OTHER WORDS (as I'm not very clear when I re-read what I wrote)

Quote
10 reps (activation) + 10sec rest, 3 reps + 10 sec rest, 3 reps (third rep slow and grindy) this is Fatigue Stop 1 (FS1)

now... + 20sec rest, 2 reps (so - longer rest and less reps) + 20sec rest, 2 reps etc until 2nd rep slow and grindy - you've reached Fatigue Stop 2 (FS2) so STOP.

Do you put the bar back on the squat rack when FS1 occurs?
« Last Edit: February 23, 2011, 06:11:50 pm by Raptor »

LanceSTS

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Re: Random Strength and Conditioning Posts/Articles/Info That I Like
« Reply #12 on: February 23, 2011, 06:49:25 pm »
0
 Yes, you re rack the bar during each pause.  The length and number of pauses will depend on your goals, and you dont have to use 10 reps either.  at times u may end up with 8 + 2+2+1, or 9+3+3+3+2, etc.  You can pause just long enough (10-15 secs) to be able to do another rep (this will be alot less intensive and allow a sooner second workout of the same body part), or you can pause longer like you would for a traditional rest pause set.  
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LanceSTS

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Re: Random Strength and Conditioning Posts/Articles/Info That I Like
« Reply #13 on: March 02, 2011, 04:05:19 pm »
0
 Post from CT on raw bench press form.


Quote
For as long as I can remember every time I started to get really strong on the bench press, my shoulder started hurting. I did everything right, but it still ended up hurting. Until I adopted a benching technique that is almost the polar opposite of what is taught in powerlifting circles.

And this is not a dig at the top powerlifters. But I learned that what is applied to equipped powerlifting technique, training and exercise selection-wise is not always adapted to raw lifting.

In powerlifting you are taught to depress and retract the scapula and spread the lats when benching. This technique takes advantage of the bench shirt, and the bench shirt itself stabilized the shoulder joint, decreasing the risk of injury.

But I found that this technique didn't help me avoid shoulder issues.

What did help is the technique I developed which consists of powerfully contracting (shrugging) the traps when setting up to bench and maintaining that contraction during the whole set. This action stabilized the shoulders A LOT. This helped me to keep my shoulders healthy, even though I'm at my strongest ever, and boosted my bench almost instantly. It did the same with my training partner Nick and all who I've taught it to.

The technique is simple:

- Set-up on the bench... the initial set-up is much like a regular powerlifting bench.
- Grab the bar and lift your butt in the air. There should be as little of "you" touching the bench as possible, help yourself by pulling on the bar if needed.
- From that position shrug your traps forcefully as if trying to touch your ears with your shoulders.
- When this is done, lower yourself back to the bench while keeping the traps contrated HARD. Keep the lower back arched.
- Unrack the bar, stay shrugged and lower the bar to your chest, still shrugged.
- Lift the bar explosively from your chest

This technique has the advantage of protecting your shoulders and making it easier to set up. With the traditional powerlifting bench, when you unrack the bar it is hard to keep the lats tensed and the body in the proper position, not so with my technique.

In my experience this method is optimal for the raw lifter, especially if he has shoulder issues.
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LanceSTS

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Re: Random Strength and Conditioning Posts/Articles/Info That I Like
« Reply #14 on: March 10, 2011, 04:08:41 pm »
0
 Another rest pause variation, specifically geared towards the big lifts, from Christian Thibadeau.









Scheme #1: 5-4-3-2-1 Rest/Pause

I just recently began using this specific method and the gains are quite impressive! I've always been a fan of rest/pause training, especially when it comes to building muscle mass in the advanced trainee (who needs more intense stimulation). It's one of the only ways to combine very heavy loading with moderately high volume without having to jack up the sets significantly.

With this specific rest/pause technique, you end up performing 15 reps with a load that you could normally perform for five or six reps. To do so you'll need to take several pauses during the set to allow for partial metabolic and neural recovery to occur so that you can get a few more reps. A set will look like this:

Perform five reps. The weight should be challenging but not lead to failure. If you reach failure on the first leg of the set, you won't have time for sufficient metabolic and neural recovery to occur before starting the second leg of the set. After you've completed the five reps, rest for 10 to 12 seconds.

After the short 10-12 seconds of rest, unrack the same weight again and complete four more repetitions, then take another 10-12 seconds of rest.

When the 10-12 second break is over, grab the weight and lift the load for three additional reps. As with the completion of the preceding legs, rest for 10-12 seconds once you've completed the required reps.

You're now into the next-to-last leg of the set. During this one you have to lift the weight for only two repetitions (but they'll feel like 30 reps!). Once you're done, take one last 10-12 second break before attempting the last leg of the set.

Okay, you're almost there! Once the 10-12 seconds have elapsed you only have to lift the weight one more time to complete the set. So that gives you a total of 15 reps with a load you could've lifted probably six, maybe seven times during a normal set.

I have no doubt in my mind that this is one of the most powerful ways to train if you want to build a lot of muscle mass, density, and strength. However, understand that this is a very taxing method, both on the CNS, muscular structures, and metabolic processes. You really can't do a lot of such sets on an exercise.

Ideally you shouldn't do more than three 5-4-3-2-1 sets for an exercise, and most people will be better served doing only two (and even just one set!). If you can do more than three it's because you're not putting a proper effort into your sets.


Q & A: 5-4-3-2-1 Method

Q: If one early leg of the set was taken to failure or was particularly grueling, what do I do?

A: The objective of the 5-4-3-2-1 method is to complete all 15 reps of the set. If you reach muscle failure, it should be on that final rep.

However, on some sets it might occur earlier, normally in the second (four reps) leg of the set. If that happens you should extend the length of the interval prior to the next leg to 15 or even 20 seconds to allow a little extra time for sufficient recovery to take place so that you can complete the upcoming legs.

Q: I'm a beginner and I really want to pile on muscle fast!Would this method be a good choice for me?

A: Hell no! This method should be limited to advanced trainees and some strong intermediate ones. I know how the beginner's mind functions: adding muscle is an emotional issue, especially in the newbie. You want to grow a ton of muscle now. So when you read about a method that's as effective as this one, it's normal to be seduced into trying it. The thing is that for a beginner this method is:

1. Not necessary: More advanced trainees require a more pronounced/intense training stimulus to force muscle growth to happen. Beginners are much more responsive because they're starting from a much lower point. The further away you are from your maximum potential, the easier progress should be. It's smarter to keep this method in the toolbox for when it's really needed.

2. Not optimal: The average beginner doesn't have the capacity to recruit the high-threshold motor units as effectively as advanced trainees. This is because their nervous system isn't "good" at activating these powerful fibers yet. This method targets these HTMUs extensively; if you're not good at recruiting them, then the method won't be super effective for you.

3. More hazardous: Beginners who might not have perfect control of their lifting technique yet, or young individuals who don't yet have a fully developed structure, shouldn't use maximal intensity methods since the risk for injury is higher.
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