Author Topic: Saturated fat and heart disease  (Read 1669 times)

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gukl

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Saturated fat and heart disease
« on: March 18, 2014, 10:50:05 am »
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http://mobile.nytimes.com/blogs/well/2014/03/17/study-questions-fat-and-heart-disease-link/

New study involving 600k people shows no link between sat fat and heart disease! Probably won't come as a surprise to most on this site but hopefully we start to see guideline changes from the stupid obed currently out! Also nice to see this in mainstream news after all the comments/shock /concerns I got when doing keto...

TKXII

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Re: Saturated fat and heart disease
« Reply #1 on: March 23, 2014, 10:04:02 am »
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Yea no surprise. Keto though, will be interesting to see cohort studies on that in the future. I doubt keto can be successful long term.
"Performance during stretch-shortening cycle exercise is influenced by the visco-elastic properties of the muscle-tendon units. During stretching of an activated muscle, mechanical energy is absorbed in the tendon structures (tendon and aponeurosis) and this energy can subsequently be re-utilized if shortening of the muscle immediately follows the stretching. According to Biscotti (2000), 72% of the elastic energy restitution action comes from tendons, 28% - from contractile elements of muscles.

http://www.verkhoshansky.com/Portals/0/Presentations/Shock%20Method%20Plyometrics.pdf

LBSS

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Re: Saturated fat and heart disease
« Reply #2 on: March 24, 2014, 10:24:57 am »
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a lot of the studies around using keto in medical practice are for epilepsy and migraines. e.g.:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24464515

Quote
J Child Neurol. 2014 Jan 23. [Epub ahead of print]
The Ketogenic Diet as Broad-Spectrum Treatment for Super-Refractory Pediatric Status Epilepticus: Challenges in Implementation in the Pediatric and Neonatal Intensive Care Units.
Cobo NH1, Sankar R, Murata KK, Sewak SL, Kezele MA, Matsumoto JH.
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Abstract
Refractory status epilepticus carries significant morbidity and mortality. Recent reports have promoted the use of the ketogenic diet as an effective treatment for refractory status epilepticus. We describe our recent experience with instituting the ketogenic diet for 4 critically ill children in refractory status epilepticus, ranging in age from 9 weeks to 13.5 years after failure of traditional treatment. The ketogenic diet allowed these patients to be weaned off continuous infusions of anesthetics without recurrence of status epilepticus, though delayed ketosis and persistently elevated glucose measurements posed special challenges to effective initiation, and none experienced complete seizure cessation. The ease of sustaining myocardial function with fatty acid energy substrates compares favorably over the myocardial toxicity posed by anesthetic doses of barbiturates and contributes to the safety profile of the ketogenic diet. The ketogenic diet can be implemented successfully and safely for the treatment of refractory status epilepticus in pediatric patients.

but not all:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24557522

Quote
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2014 Feb 19;11(2):2092-107. doi: 10.3390/ijerph110202092.
Ketogenic diet for obesity: friend or foe?
Paoli A.
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Abstract
Obesity is reaching epidemic proportions and is a strong risk factor for a number of cardiovascular and metabolic disorders such as hypertension, type 2 diabetes, dyslipidemia, atherosclerosis, and also certain types of cancers. Despite the constant recommendations of health care organizations regarding the importance of weight control, this goal often fails. Genetic predisposition in combination with inactive lifestyles and high caloric intake leads to excessive weight gain. Even though there may be agreement about the concept that lifestyle changes affecting dietary habits and physical activity are essential to promote weight loss and weight control, the ideal amount and type of exercise and also the ideal diet are still under debate. For many years, nutritional intervention studies have been focused on reducing dietary fat with little positive results over the long-term. One of the most studied strategies in the recent years for weight loss is the ketogenic diet. Many studies have shown that this kind of nutritional approach has a solid physiological and biochemical basis and is able to induce effective weight loss along with improvement in several cardiovascular risk parameters. This review discusses the physiological basis of ketogenic diets and the rationale for their use in obesity, discussing the strengths and the weaknesses of these diets together with cautions that should be used in obese patients.
Muscles are nonsensical they have nothing to do with this bullshit.

- Avishek

sunday: long very easy run 80+ mins @ 5:40+ (14+ km)
monday: strength/cross training
tuesday: extensive tempo (7 km) OR fartlek (mostly easy pace with mix of strides, hills, long tempo) 45 mins (8+ km)
wednesday: easy run 60+ mins @ 5:20-5:30 (11+ km)
thursday: easy run 60+ mins @ 5:20-5:30 (11+ km), strength/cross-training
friday: rest
saturday: short tempo 6-8x500 @ sub-4:00 (7 km)

strength would be:
- hops 2x10
- box jumps or ME SVJ 2x5
- squats 3x6-8 or weighted BSS/lunges 3x10/leg
- RDL/hypers 2x10-12 or SLRDL 2x10-12/leg
- upper push myo-reps or sets to technical failure
- upper pull myo-reps or sets to technical failure
- leg raises, holds, pallof presses