Author Topic: Hormones, supercompensation and over-reaching  (Read 8638 times)

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tychver

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Hormones, supercompensation and over-reaching
« on: March 25, 2011, 05:36:43 am »
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If a thread for this stuff has already been started I appologize but I couldn't find it at a cursory glance.

Lon Kilgore:
Hartman, M.J., B. Clark, D.A. Bemben, J.L. Kilgore, and M.G. Bemben (2007).  Comparisons between twice-daily and single-daily training sessions in male weightlifters.  International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance, 2:159-169.

Kilgore, J.L., G.P. Pendlay, J.S. Reeves, and T.G. Kilgore (2002).  Serum chemistry and hematological adaptations to 6 weeks of moderate to intense resistance training.  Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, 16(4):509-15.

Kraemer, R.R., E.O. Acevedo, D.A. Dzewaltowski, J.L. Kilgore, G.R. Kraemer, and V.D. Castracane (1996). Effects of low-volume resistive exercise on Beta-endorphin and cortisol concentrations. International Journal of Sports Medicine, 17(1): 12 - 16.

Kraemer, R.R., J.L. Kilgore and G.R. Kraemer (1993).  Plasma volume changes in response to resistive exercise. Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness, 33, 246 - 251.

Kraemer, R.R., J.L. Kilgore, G.R. Kraemer, and V.D. Castracane (1992).  Growth hormone, IGF-1, and testosterone responses to resistive exercise. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 24(12), 1346 - 1352.

I'll post abstracts when I have time or full articles if possible. Anything anyone else wants to contribute I wanna read. I know there's some interesting shit out there on the phisiological changes during over-reaching.

JelloPuddinPup

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Re: Hormones, supercompensation and over-reaching
« Reply #1 on: March 25, 2011, 08:34:03 am »
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Can you find those by just typing them in to Google?
My real name is Daniel. (6'5" - 217lbs.)

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tychver

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Re: Hormones, supercompensation and over-reaching
« Reply #2 on: March 25, 2011, 08:01:35 pm »
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Kilgore, J.L., G.P. Pendlay, J.S. Reeves, and T.G. Kilgore (2002).  Serum chemistry and hematological adaptations to 6 weeks of moderate to intense resistance training.  Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, 16(4):509-15.

Quote
This study examined immune cell and blood chemistry changes occurring in trained weightlifters after 1 week of rest followed by 6 weeks of Olympic-style resistance exercise. Blood was drawn weekly after 1 day of rest at the same time and on the same day of the week for 7 weeks. Lymphocyte numbers increased in weeks 5 through 7. Sodium concentration rose above entry levels in week 2, remained elevated, and peaked in week 5. Direct bilirubin dropped below baseline values in the final week. Chloride and alkaline phosphatase concentrations increased as training progressed. Chloride, potassium, albumin, CO(2), and alkaline phosphatase concentrations peaked in weeks 4 through 6. Serum creatinine was elevated in weeks 2 through 5. Data indicate that resistance training induces changes in immune cell count and blood chemistry that remain within, or near, normal clinical values. It appears that resistance training does not induce immunosuppression or negatively affect hepatic or renal function.

tychver

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Re: Hormones, supercompensation and over-reaching
« Reply #3 on: March 25, 2011, 08:03:28 pm »
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Effect of oral DHEA on serum testosterone and adaptations to resistance training in young men.
by G A Brown, M D Vukovich, R L Sharp, T A Reifenrath, K A Parsons, D S King Journal of Applied Physiology (1999)
Volume: 87, Issue: 6, Pages: 2274-2283

Quote
This study examined the effects of acute dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) ingestion on serum steroid hormones and the effect of chronic DHEA intake on the adaptations to resistance training. In 10 young men (23 4 yr old), ingestion of 50 mg of DHEA increased serum androstenedione concentrations 150% within 60 min (P < 0.05) but did not affect serum testosterone and estrogen concentrations. An additional 19 men (23 1 yr old) participated in an 8-wk whole body resistance-training program and ingested DHEA (150 mg/day, n = 9) or placebo (n = 10) during weeks 1, 2, 4, 5, 7, and 8. Serum androstenedione concentrations were significantly (P < 0.05) increased in the DHEA-treated group after 2 and 5 wk. Serum concentrations of free and total testosterone, estrone, estradiol, estriol, lipids, and liver transaminases were unaffected by supplementation and training, while strength and lean body mass increased significantly and similarly (P < 0.05) in the men treated with placebo and DHEA. These results suggest that DHEA ingestion does not enhance serum testosterone concentrations or adaptations associated with resistance training in young men.

tychver

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Re: Hormones, supercompensation and over-reaching
« Reply #4 on: March 25, 2011, 08:10:11 pm »
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Kraemer, R.R., E.O. Acevedo, D.A. Dzewaltowski, J.L. Kilgore, G.R. Kraemer, and V.D. Castracane (1996). Effects of low-volume resistive exercise on Beta-endorphin and cortisol concentrations. International Journal of Sports Medicine, 17(1): 12 - 16.

Quote
It has been recently suggested that high and sustained lactate levels may elicit increases in peripheral B-EN concentrations (16). We have observed elevated and sustained lactate concentrations in response to a low-volume resistive exercise protocol (14) that were similar to those from other exercise protocols that produced elevated beta-endorphin (B-EN) concentrations. Thus, the purpose of the study was to determine the effects of a low-volume (21,700 J) resistive exercise repetition maximum (RM) protocol using weight machines on peripheral lactate, B-EN and cortisol concentrations. Subjects completed 3 sets of bench press, lat-pull, leg extension, and leg curl exercise at a 10-RM load. Blood samples were collected and rating of perceived exertion (RPE, 15-point Borg scale) was assessed before exercise (-40 and -10 min), after each exercise, and after the exercise session (+ 35 min); blood samples were collected at 7 additional post-exercise times. RPE increased significantly throughout the exercise. Lactate concentrations rose significantly to peak at 8.54 mM at LE. B-EN and cortisol concentrations (-10) of 4.63 +/- 0.54 pmol.l-1 and 12.09 +/- 1.44 micrograms.dl-1, respectively, were not significantly elevated over time. The data suggest that a low-volume resistive exercise protocol using weight machines elevates lactate concentrations without altering B-EN and cortisol concentrations.

tychver

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Re: Hormones, supercompensation and over-reaching
« Reply #5 on: March 25, 2011, 08:21:16 pm »
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Kraemer, R.R., J.L. Kilgore and G.R. Kraemer (1993).  Plasma volume changes in response to resistive exercise. Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness, 33, 246 - 251.

Quote
The present study was designed to determine the cumulative effects of a series of four resistive exercises on intravascular plasma volume throughout one exercise session. Seven healthy males, mean (+/- SE) age 26.7 +/- 1.2 y, participated in the study. In two separate trials the subjects' one-repetition maximum (1-RM) and 10-RM were determined. In a third session, an IV catheter was inserted into a forearm vein at 0800 h and kept patent with a heparin lock. At 0940 h three sets of bench press (BP), lat pull (LP), leg extension (LE), and leg curl (LC) were executed at a 10-RM load for 10 repetitions or until failure. Blood samples were collected before (-30, 0), during (after BP, LP, LE, LC), and after [5 min, 15 min, and 25 min into recovery (R5, R15, R25)] the resistive exercise session. Plasma volume was reduced as much as -13.35% at LE and returned to normal after R15. We conclude that plasma volume is substantially reduced after performing a short session of upper and lower body resistive exercises. The findings demonstrate the magnitude of resistive-exercise-induced plasma volume loss and underscore the importance of accounting for plasma volume change when determining response of a particular blood parameter to resistive exercise.

DocAndy

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Re: Hormones, supercompensation and over-reaching
« Reply #6 on: April 12, 2012, 10:06:42 pm »
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Hartman M, Clark B, Bemben D, Kilgore J, Bemben M. Comparisons Between Twice-Daily and Once-Daily Training Sessions in Male Weight Lifters. International Journal Of Sports Physiology & Performance [serial online]. June 2007;2(2):159-169.

Quote
EMG (+20.3% vs +9.1%), testosterone (+ 10.5% vs +6.4%), and testosterone:cortisol ratio (-10.5% vs +1.3%) than did the once-daily training group. Conclusions: There were no additional benefits from increased daily training frequency in national-level male weightlifters, but the increase in ISO and EMG activity for the twice-daily group might provide some rationale for dividing training load in an attempt to reduce the risk of overtraining

Can you say testosterone!! And double the EMG?  Talk about creating potential for some serious jump improvements!

LBSS

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Re: Hormones, supercompensation and over-reaching
« Reply #7 on: April 13, 2012, 09:04:08 am »
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tiny sample size, short duration, inconclusive with respect to performance improvement... what's the big deal again?
Muscles are nonsensical they have nothing to do with this bullshit.

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sunday: run 14+ km
monday: lift
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thursday: run 10-12 km
friday: rest
saturday: run tempo/VO2 max/speed x 6-8 km

DocAndy

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Re: Hormones, supercompensation and over-reaching
« Reply #8 on: April 13, 2012, 12:57:53 pm »
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For the avg. Joe, nothing too exciting.  For the elite lifter, it may show some insight. 

TKXII

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"Performance during stretch-shortening cycle exercise is influenced by the visco-elastic properties of the muscle-tendon units. During stretching of an activated muscle, mechanical energy is absorbed in the tendon structures (tendon and aponeurosis) and this energy can subsequently be re-utilized if shortening of the muscle immediately follows the stretching. According to Biscotti (2000), 72% of the elastic energy restitution action comes from tendons, 28% - from contractile elements of muscles.

http://www.verkhoshansky.com/Portals/0/Presentations/Shock%20Method%20Plyometrics.pdf