Author Topic: Loaded vs. unloaded plyos -- effects on basketball players  (Read 4383 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

LBSS

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 11430
  • plugging away...
  • Respect: +6066
    • View Profile
    • Email
Loaded vs. unloaded plyos -- effects on basketball players
« on: October 19, 2010, 11:13:59 am »
0
Muscles are nonsensical they have nothing to do with this bullshit.

- Avishek

handstand + backflip + flag

adarqui

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 30416
  • who run it.
  • Respect: +7440
    • View Profile
    • Email
Re: Loaded vs. unloaded plyos -- effects on basketball players
« Reply #1 on: October 19, 2010, 05:16:46 pm »
0

any idea what the plyometric routine was? curious to see how intense it was.

LBSS

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 11430
  • plugging away...
  • Respect: +6066
    • View Profile
    • Email
Re: Loaded vs. unloaded plyos -- effects on basketball players
« Reply #2 on: October 19, 2010, 08:31:07 pm »
0
Muscles are nonsensical they have nothing to do with this bullshit.

- Avishek

handstand + backflip + flag

LBSS

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 11430
  • plugging away...
  • Respect: +6066
    • View Profile
    • Email
Re: Loaded vs. unloaded plyos -- effects on basketball players
« Reply #3 on: October 21, 2010, 10:09:08 pm »
0
Muscles are nonsensical they have nothing to do with this bullshit.

- Avishek

handstand + backflip + flag

ssr7

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 288
  • Respect: +4
    • View Profile
    • Email
Re: Loaded vs. unloaded plyos -- effects on basketball players
« Reply #4 on: October 22, 2010, 10:31:35 am »
0
Interesting study. I remember Kellyb mentioning that loads on jumping/bounding/sprinting movements should be such that they reduce height/distance covered/sprint times by no more than 10%. Do you think a 10-11% BM load would only elicit a <10% performance drop-off?

LBSS

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 11430
  • plugging away...
  • Respect: +6066
    • View Profile
    • Email
Re: Loaded vs. unloaded plyos -- effects on basketball players
« Reply #5 on: October 22, 2010, 10:41:08 am »
0
Interesting study. I remember Kellyb mentioning that loads on jumping/bounding/sprinting movements should be such that they reduce height/distance covered/sprint times by no more than 10%. Do you think a 10-11% BM load would only elicit a <10% performance drop-off?

No idea. Wonder why he said that...
Muscles are nonsensical they have nothing to do with this bullshit.

- Avishek

handstand + backflip + flag

T0ddday

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1343
  • Respect: +1114
    • View Profile
    • Email
Re: Loaded vs. unloaded plyos -- effects on basketball players
« Reply #6 on: August 22, 2011, 05:25:23 pm »
0
Interesting.  Do you have data on the SVJ/RVJ and strength numbers of the athletes before the test?  My point of view has always been:

1) Athlete is weak and slow:  Plyometrics are of little use
2) Athlete is moderately strong: Plyometrics are useful but weighted plyometrics are not.
3) Athlete is strong reactive and does not carry extra bodyfat:  Plyometrics and weighted plyometrics are useful.


Obviously the scale is continuous.  But the point is basically the more advanced the trainee is the more helpful weighted plyos are.  I think of weighted plyos sort of like depth jumps from a large height.  For advanced athletes they are great.  For beginners they are simply a fast track to injury.     

adarqui

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 30416
  • who run it.
  • Respect: +7440
    • View Profile
    • Email
Re: Loaded vs. unloaded plyos -- effects on basketball players
« Reply #7 on: August 25, 2011, 09:27:19 am »
0
Interesting.  Do you have data on the SVJ/RVJ and strength numbers of the athletes before the test?  My point of view has always been:

1) Athlete is weak and slow:  Plyometrics are of little use
2) Athlete is moderately strong: Plyometrics are useful but weighted plyometrics are not.
3) Athlete is strong reactive and does not carry extra bodyfat:  Plyometrics and weighted plyometrics are useful.


Obviously the scale is continuous.  But the point is basically the more advanced the trainee is the more helpful weighted plyos are.  I think of weighted plyos sort of like depth jumps from a large height.  For advanced athletes they are great.  For beginners they are simply a fast track to injury.    

ya, that's why on here you'll catch alot of us talking about "low level reactive work", stuff like repetitive tuck jumps, pogos, line hop drills, etc.. i like those for beginners or any experience level, as long as they do not carry a high body fat % and are healthy, it's good to get in some rebounding training even if you're weak, but the intensity of the rebound training has to be low if you're weak... people who are really weak trying to perform depth jumps, bounds, etc, are asking for problems.. however, i consider low box dj's as safe for beginners, like 12" boxes etc.. any level of athlete will benefit from light rebound training, it still reinforces improvements in rfd/SEC efficiency.

pC