Author Topic: Bobsled training and 60m times  (Read 4922 times)

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TKXII

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Re: Bobsled training and 60m times
« Reply #15 on: November 16, 2013, 10:56:39 pm »
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nope, I simply acknowledged what you said and revised my original statement. that's not a contradiction.
"Performance during stretch-shortening cycle exercise is influenced by the visco-elastic properties of the muscle-tendon units. During stretching of an activated muscle, mechanical energy is absorbed in the tendon structures (tendon and aponeurosis) and this energy can subsequently be re-utilized if shortening of the muscle immediately follows the stretching. According to Biscotti (2000), 72% of the elastic energy restitution action comes from tendons, 28% - from contractile elements of muscles.

http://www.verkhoshansky.com/Portals/0/Presentations/Shock%20Method%20Plyometrics.pdf

T0ddday

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Re: Bobsled training and 60m times
« Reply #16 on: November 20, 2013, 09:41:35 am »
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Lol, this thread is really silly.  Personally I really hate when the words timed electronically are used to describe something other than FAT timing.  It REALLY leads to confusion.  The 40yd dash is timed electronically, but it isn't FAT.  Now in bobsledding we have this strange standing past the line weird timing.... Since the base it on the footstrike do they end the clock when the foot lands past 60m or the torso crosses?  Wish we could stick to hand-times and electronic (FAT) times.  Would make things simpler. 

Saying they are the fastest requires you to describe what speed is.  200m athletes have the fastest average velocity.   Distance runners certainly are fast over the distances they cover.   In track we call the 100m winner the world fastest because he usually they invariably always hit the highest instantaneously velocity.    Bolt is tops at 12.3 m/s (or a 0.82 10m split).   That's what should be compared when we talk about fastest. 

By FAT reaction time measures the initial reaction (first twitch), this "electronic time" seems to start when your foot leaves the ground.  Way different.  One of the world-record beaters on that list (6.36) is Johnny Quinn who I've run against and he is a 10.6-10.9 guy.   I promise if you put a world class sprinter in this test they would all be sub 6.