Author Topic: Weightlifter VS Athlete VS Freerunner :: SVJ box jump competition  (Read 1947 times)

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vag

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<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zg2Z1pusas8" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zg2Z1pusas8</a>

Fuck box jumps!
Cool video though...
woot

Raptor

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Re: Weightlifter VS Athlete VS Freerunner :: SVJ box jump competition
« Reply #1 on: October 12, 2013, 07:08:55 pm »
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The weightlifter has an advantage in the shoes allowing him to get lower in the SVJ and exert more power through a longer ROM.

vag

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Re: Weightlifter VS Athlete VS Freerunner :: SVJ box jump competition
« Reply #2 on: October 13, 2013, 03:14:19 am »
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The weightlifter has an advantage having done endless squats and cleans and snatches in the shoes allowing him to get lower in the SVJ and exert more power through a longer ROM.

Fixed!  :P
woot

TKXII

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Re: Weightlifter VS Athlete VS Freerunner :: SVJ box jump competition
« Reply #3 on: October 14, 2013, 01:27:14 am »
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The weightlifter has an advantage having done endless squats and cleans and snatches in the shoes allowing him to get lower in the SVJ and exert more power through a longer ROM.

Fixed!  :P

Great. I'm going to start doing box jumps from a below parallel position, since that clearly confers biomechanical advantages.

 :uhhhfacepalm:
"Performance during stretch-shortening cycle exercise is influenced by the visco-elastic properties of the muscle-tendon units. During stretching of an activated muscle, mechanical energy is absorbed in the tendon structures (tendon and aponeurosis) and this energy can subsequently be re-utilized if shortening of the muscle immediately follows the stretching. According to Biscotti (2000), 72% of the elastic energy restitution action comes from tendons, 28% - from contractile elements of muscles.

http://www.verkhoshansky.com/Portals/0/Presentations/Shock%20Method%20Plyometrics.pdf

Raptor

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Re: Weightlifter VS Athlete VS Freerunner :: SVJ box jump competition
« Reply #4 on: October 14, 2013, 02:56:46 am »
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The weightlifter has an advantage having done endless squats and cleans and snatches in the shoes allowing him to get lower in the SVJ and exert more power through a longer ROM.

Fixed!  :P

Great. I'm going to start doing box jumps from a below parallel position, since that clearly confers biomechanical advantages.

 :uhhhfacepalm:

It does - more time to generate power. In any kind of SVJ, that's a good thing.

TKXII

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Re: Weightlifter VS Athlete VS Freerunner :: SVJ box jump competition
« Reply #5 on: October 14, 2013, 05:36:08 pm »
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Really? I just assumed since most of his training involves moving the body from that position it's just his motor pattern.
"Performance during stretch-shortening cycle exercise is influenced by the visco-elastic properties of the muscle-tendon units. During stretching of an activated muscle, mechanical energy is absorbed in the tendon structures (tendon and aponeurosis) and this energy can subsequently be re-utilized if shortening of the muscle immediately follows the stretching. According to Biscotti (2000), 72% of the elastic energy restitution action comes from tendons, 28% - from contractile elements of muscles.

http://www.verkhoshansky.com/Portals/0/Presentations/Shock%20Method%20Plyometrics.pdf