Author Topic: basketball conditioning  (Read 493 times)

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maxent

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basketball conditioning
« on: April 30, 2018, 01:43:02 pm »
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Did you guys know know that the average heart rate for a male basketball is 169 ± 9 beats? Or in other words in the range of 160-180? That's average for the whole match (including live and dead periods). I found this surprising. 

The more I research the conditioning demands of basketball the more interesting it gets. Take this table from a brazilian study. It gives a glimpse of how HR varies for different positions through out the game:



Another study to read. Interesting table below:


Had no idea the demands on the heart were so great for basketball players..
Making a new strength setpoint of 75/100/150 on OHP/BP/BS.

acole14

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Re: basketball conditioning
« Reply #1 on: May 01, 2018, 08:12:07 am »
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I can definitely believe all that. BBall fitness is underrated. For me, the hardest sessions in terms of RPE in my life have been: speed endurance sprinting>full-court bball scrimmage with good players>XC running>pretty much everything else.

On a related note, a lot of ex-NBA players (usually bigs) have had heart issues. Some of it might be lifestyle, but still interesting.

maxent

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Re: basketball conditioning
« Reply #2 on: May 01, 2018, 08:28:24 am »
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I can definitely believe all that. BBall fitness is underrated. For me, the hardest sessions in terms of RPE in my life have been: speed endurance sprinting>full-court bball scrimmage with good players>XC running>pretty much everything else.

Interesting to hear you say that with your track background. Would you conjecture why you think basketball in a competitive, full court setting is so demanding on fitness? In the live setting your defender is playing close to max effort trying to stop you and you're trying max effort to beat them that it's a game of maximum efforts on both sides.

Quote
On a related note, a lot of ex-NBA players (usually bigs) have had heart issues. Some of it might be lifestyle, but still interesting.

Been doing a lot of reading and in particular studies of the heart disease of AF affects taller men quite a bit more than shorter men. Females in general have it best when it comes to heart disease also. Tall and male is a bad recipe for heart health, esp later down the line when the excess weight and stress on the heart adds up over a lifetime. Or in other words, there is a reason why small old men live longer lives .. the tall big guys dont make it as far.

Making a new strength setpoint of 75/100/150 on OHP/BP/BS.

LBSS

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Re: basketball conditioning
« Reply #3 on: May 01, 2018, 12:47:14 pm »
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fast pace, lots of change of direction, lots of time in a semi-squat position, lots of explosive movement. the equivalent for me in terms of effort is indoor ultimate, which is exhausting.
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adarqui

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Re: basketball conditioning
« Reply #4 on: May 01, 2018, 09:24:19 pm »
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nice data & discussion!

Definitely can see HR's being up near that high (160+ for sure) during a competitive game (while you're in it).

From my experience in basketball, I was much less aerobically developed than I was lactic threshold developed. I mean I could go hard in bursts for from a few seconds to say 60s, over and over, but I can't imagine I would have been good at running a solid pace for a decent amount of time. I was adapted to start-stop-repeat. Working on their aerobic base might help get the HR's down a bit & make them more efficient, but it comes at the cost of skill work etc. Could help to build it up more in the off season. In-season it would be hard to maintain, for sure. If I go a week without long run work, my HR starts going back up, which is probably good tbh - having it "chronically" low can bring its' own problems.

The key to this kind of data to me points to the lack of sustained aerobic long running. Add to that the idea that it's a contact sport with more adrenaline surges, HR is going to be high. If you're not highly aerobically trained, HR has to be high in order to pump all of that blood around, just don't have the efficiency of doing so at lower HR's like a highly aerobically trained athlete is.

Also, when I was intense basketball dribbling a month ago or so, my HR was very low. I had to work incredibly hard to get it into the 130's. It was mostly 10X-12X. I'd love to know how that would differ (if at all) to when I was actually basketball trained, ie if it is considerably lower now due to how i've been training.

Oh also #2: jumping gets your HR way up, very fast. So going up for rebounds, layups, shots etc, really causes the HR to shoot up very quick based on what i've seen from my own HR data when I was jumping with my HRM.

my quick 2cents.

peace!

ChrisM

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Re: basketball conditioning
« Reply #5 on: May 02, 2018, 01:45:36 am »
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This explains why I felt like dying the other day 😂

Agree with Andrew though thoroughly in regards to aerobic distance running having a negative correlation to the start>stop>start environment of a competitive game. I was told (incorrectly) to run cross country to help build a better stamina base for basketball at the end of my freshman year. I got really good at running steady for a 5k. And sucked ass in spring practice. It took the entire summer to get my explosive tendency back and, this is unquantifiable data, I felt LESS tired in the 4th quarter than when I was running distance. I bro science it towards wiring my body to explode consistently vs training it in slow, steady states. Just my uneducated pennies
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