Author Topic: Pre Testing Warm ups  (Read 219 times)

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seifullaah73

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Pre Testing Warm ups
« on: August 01, 2020, 09:02:06 am »
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I'm curious to know the warm up routine of people on here before they test their vertical jumps, max lifts and before timing their sprint times.
Warm up drills
   - a walk, b skip quick powerful switch (heel to hams focus), a runs, dribbles small to big to run, straight leg to runs (force, reflex, go up/forward). force to hit the ground before it hits the ground knee/hip is at 90 degrees.
   - acceleration: low heel recovery, shin angle low, drive legs back before hitting the ground and drive thighs/knee forward not up
-------------------------------------------------------------
Measuring reminder:
5 toe to heel steps = 148cm
------------------------------------------------------------------------

�Strength comes from the legs, Power comes from the torso and Speed comes from the arm.� � Al Vermeil
Arm also aids the legs in driving it down with power - seifullaah73

My Progress Log
A Journey to Running fast and Jumping High
http://www.adarq.org/progress-journals-experimental-routines/my-journey-to-hypertrophy/

CoolColJ

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Re: Pre Testing Warm ups
« Reply #1 on: August 01, 2020, 10:10:18 am »
+1
dynamic swings for legs, front/back, side to side, tib/calf rocking, backwards/ sideways moving
movement efficiency hops

then start jumping from light effort building up

for weights, the above and then I just warm up with light loads and ramp up to singles towards the test weight, then walkout with a load 10% heavier than the test load, hold for 10 secs, then lift within 1.5 mins

LBSS

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Re: Pre Testing Warm ups
« Reply #2 on: August 01, 2020, 10:39:32 am »
+1
^^^pretty much that, except i'd also add glute activation (e.g. bridges or SL bridges)
Muscles are nonsensical they have nothing to do with this bullshit.

- Avishek

sunday: run 14+ km
monday: lift
tuesday: run 10-12 km
wednesday: run 10-12 km
thursday: run 10-12 km
friday: rest
saturday: run tempo/VO2 max/speed x 6-8 km

https://www.savannahstate.edu/cost/nrotc/documents/Inform2010-thearmstrongworkout_Enclosure15_5-2-10.pdf

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seifullaah73

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Re: Pre Testing Warm ups
« Reply #3 on: August 01, 2020, 12:12:46 pm »
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So you don't light weight box squats or any light lower body explosive workout to activate fibres and motor neurons and feel light maybe giving you a good result in the vertical jump or faster sprint time with light resistance running.
Warm up drills
   - a walk, b skip quick powerful switch (heel to hams focus), a runs, dribbles small to big to run, straight leg to runs (force, reflex, go up/forward). force to hit the ground before it hits the ground knee/hip is at 90 degrees.
   - acceleration: low heel recovery, shin angle low, drive legs back before hitting the ground and drive thighs/knee forward not up
-------------------------------------------------------------
Measuring reminder:
5 toe to heel steps = 148cm
------------------------------------------------------------------------

�Strength comes from the legs, Power comes from the torso and Speed comes from the arm.� � Al Vermeil
Arm also aids the legs in driving it down with power - seifullaah73

My Progress Log
A Journey to Running fast and Jumping High
http://www.adarq.org/progress-journals-experimental-routines/my-journey-to-hypertrophy/

CoolColJ

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Re: Pre Testing Warm ups
« Reply #4 on: August 01, 2020, 01:15:45 pm »
+2
So you don't light weight box squats or any light lower body explosive workout to activate fibres and motor neurons and feel light maybe giving you a good result in the vertical jump or faster sprint time with light resistance running.

for me no, I find that stuffs tightens and tires me

when your peaked and jumping well, it will feel effortless and you jump high without evening trying to do so

LBSS

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Re: Pre Testing Warm ups
« Reply #5 on: August 01, 2020, 05:18:09 pm »
+1
i tried using squats to stimulate myself for jumping but it didn't seem to have an effect and took a lot of time. starting with a few max effort SVJs and then progressively increasing effort on jumps did the trick better than anything. that's for jumps.

for squats i wouldn't even do a walk-out like coolcolj suggested, although it's not a bad idea. i'd just warm up normally until i got close-ish to my goal single, and then do a few progressively heavier singles until i got to the target. so like: bar x 10, 60 x 5, 100 x 3, 120 x 2, 140 x 1, 150 x 1, goal weight: 160 x 1. lots of visualization along the way, while resting, and if it was a true max then i'd hype myself up before the goal weight by slapping my legs and cursing a lot and kind of quietly yelling at myself, if that makes sense.

for sprints, dunno. i was never very good at them.
Muscles are nonsensical they have nothing to do with this bullshit.

- Avishek

sunday: run 14+ km
monday: lift
tuesday: run 10-12 km
wednesday: run 10-12 km
thursday: run 10-12 km
friday: rest
saturday: run tempo/VO2 max/speed x 6-8 km

https://www.savannahstate.edu/cost/nrotc/documents/Inform2010-thearmstrongworkout_Enclosure15_5-2-10.pdf

black lives matter

seifullaah73

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Re: Pre Testing Warm ups
« Reply #6 on: August 03, 2020, 06:12:38 am »
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Would you take a week rest from last workout or is 2 to 3 days rest enough to be recovered fully to test out your jump/run/lifts.
Warm up drills
   - a walk, b skip quick powerful switch (heel to hams focus), a runs, dribbles small to big to run, straight leg to runs (force, reflex, go up/forward). force to hit the ground before it hits the ground knee/hip is at 90 degrees.
   - acceleration: low heel recovery, shin angle low, drive legs back before hitting the ground and drive thighs/knee forward not up
-------------------------------------------------------------
Measuring reminder:
5 toe to heel steps = 148cm
------------------------------------------------------------------------

�Strength comes from the legs, Power comes from the torso and Speed comes from the arm.� � Al Vermeil
Arm also aids the legs in driving it down with power - seifullaah73

My Progress Log
A Journey to Running fast and Jumping High
http://www.adarq.org/progress-journals-experimental-routines/my-journey-to-hypertrophy/

CoolColJ

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Re: Pre Testing Warm ups
« Reply #7 on: August 03, 2020, 08:35:42 am »
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Taper and deload, and then a few days rest, at least for jumping, the more rest the better it seems

For max lifts, deload is enough. Just follow what powerlifters do

seifullaah73

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Re: Pre Testing Warm ups
« Reply #8 on: August 03, 2020, 02:11:58 pm »
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Never heard of tapering before. After some google search I find the following:

Quote
‘a progressive nonlinear reduction of the training load during a variable period of time, in an attempt to reduce the physiological and psychological stress of daily training and optimise sports performance’.

What's the difference between taper and deload, they look the same.

Thanks
« Last Edit: August 03, 2020, 02:28:11 pm by seifullaah73 »
Warm up drills
   - a walk, b skip quick powerful switch (heel to hams focus), a runs, dribbles small to big to run, straight leg to runs (force, reflex, go up/forward). force to hit the ground before it hits the ground knee/hip is at 90 degrees.
   - acceleration: low heel recovery, shin angle low, drive legs back before hitting the ground and drive thighs/knee forward not up
-------------------------------------------------------------
Measuring reminder:
5 toe to heel steps = 148cm
------------------------------------------------------------------------

�Strength comes from the legs, Power comes from the torso and Speed comes from the arm.� � Al Vermeil
Arm also aids the legs in driving it down with power - seifullaah73

My Progress Log
A Journey to Running fast and Jumping High
http://www.adarq.org/progress-journals-experimental-routines/my-journey-to-hypertrophy/

LBSS

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Re: Pre Testing Warm ups
« Reply #9 on: August 03, 2020, 03:33:35 pm »
+1
no difference.
Muscles are nonsensical they have nothing to do with this bullshit.

- Avishek

sunday: run 14+ km
monday: lift
tuesday: run 10-12 km
wednesday: run 10-12 km
thursday: run 10-12 km
friday: rest
saturday: run tempo/VO2 max/speed x 6-8 km

https://www.savannahstate.edu/cost/nrotc/documents/Inform2010-thearmstrongworkout_Enclosure15_5-2-10.pdf

black lives matter

CoolColJ

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Re: Pre Testing Warm ups
« Reply #10 on: August 04, 2020, 12:19:07 am »
+1
Never heard of tapering before. After some google search I find the following:

Quote
‘a progressive nonlinear reduction of the training load during a variable period of time, in an attempt to reduce the physiological and psychological stress of daily training and optimise sports performance’.

What's the difference between taper and deload, they look the same.

Thanks

Taper is more of a sports training term, deload more for weights if you want to get anal :)

For lifting, say squat/deadlft, people who can lift very heavy loads like 700-1000+ lbs can take up to 2-4 weeks to recover from their last heavy session, so they spend those weeks leading up to a meet/test doing light/medium workouts to recover and peak.
Can be acomplished by reduced volume and load/intensity.
But usually intensity is kept fairly high with a big reduction in volume, and hope muscle mass doesn't drop off

Look up fitness/fatigue theory/model, and it will make more sense

https://medium.com/@SandCResearch/what-is-the-fitness-fatigue-model-6a6ca3274aab

Quote
The traditional fitness-fatigue model starts with the observation that performance tends to reduce immediately after a workout, and stays reduced for up a few days in some cases. Yet, after the initial reduction, there is a rebound, and performance then improves.

The fitness-fatigue model explains this curve by proposing that it is the sum of two curves, one representing the fatigue effect, and the other representing the fitness improvement. Only once the fatigue effect has dissipated is it possible to see the fitness effect, even though fitness has actually been improving from immediately after the end of the workout.

Without the fitness-fatigue model, we could easily fall into the trap of believing that the fitness adaptations to a workout only occur after a couple of days, because of the reduction in performance. In fact, adaptations probably occur very soon after the workout itself.

Quote
What is “fitness” in an updated model?

The traditional fitness-fatigue model does not take into account newer research showing that strength can be positively affected by transient changes in the ability to produce force, as well as by long-lasting adaptations.

Long-lasting changes in strength involve adaptations inside the central nervous system or muscle-tendon unit, such as increases in voluntary activation, or increases in muscle size.

Transient improvements in the ability to produce force occur because of potentiation, which may also involve changes in either the central nervous system or inside the muscle.

Potentiation has most often been observed to occur immediately after a strength training workout, where it is referred to as the “post-activation potentiation” effect. Even so, potentiation can also be recorded several hours or even days after a workout. It is typically only seen when fatigue is minimal, such as after training with light loads and fast bar speeds.

Thus, in an updated fitness-fatigue model, we should refer to multiple fitness effects, some of which reflect long-lasting adaptations, and some of which reflect short-term potentiation.

In the traditional fitness-fatigue model, the temporary increase in fatigue that causes transitory reductions in performance was not well-defined, because of a lack of research in the area. Yet, the fatigue and recovery literature has developed substantially since the fitness-fatigue model was first suggested.

Research into recovery has shown that there are three factors that cause transient reductions in strength after a workout: (1) peripheral fatigue, (2) central fatigue, and (3) muscle damage.

Peripheral fatigue after a strength training workout is largely caused by the accumulation of metabolites, and its effects are dissipated within hours. Similarly, central fatigue is extremely transitory, and is rarely seen beyond an hour after a strength training workout (except when it occurs subsequent to severe muscle damage).

Muscle damage can produce reductions in strength that last for up to weeks in some cases, where the damage to the muscle is severe. More commonly, however, the reductions in strength because of muscle damage last only a couple of days.

Thus, in an updated fitness-fatigue model, we should refer to multiple fatigue effects. Also, we should be clear that peripheral and central fatigue usually reflect effects lasting only a few hours, while muscle damage reflects a longer-lasting effect, and is likely the primary determinant of losses in strength on the day or days after a hard workout.






« Last Edit: August 04, 2020, 12:40:46 am by CoolColJ »

seifullaah73

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Re: Pre Testing Warm ups
« Reply #11 on: August 04, 2020, 08:01:28 am »
0
Never heard of tapering before. After some google search I find the following:

Quote
‘a progressive nonlinear reduction of the training load during a variable period of time, in an attempt to reduce the physiological and psychological stress of daily training and optimise sports performance’.

What's the difference between taper and deload, they look the same.

Thanks

Taper is more of a sports training term, deload more for weights if you want to get anal :)

For lifting, say squat/deadlft, people who can lift very heavy loads like 700-1000+ lbs can take up to 2-4 weeks to recover from their last heavy session, so they spend those weeks leading up to a meet/test doing light/medium workouts to recover and peak.
Can be acomplished by reduced volume and load/intensity.
But usually intensity is kept fairly high with a big reduction in volume, and hope muscle mass doesn't drop off

Look up fitness/fatigue theory/model, and it will make more sense

https://medium.com/@SandCResearch/what-is-the-fitness-fatigue-model-6a6ca3274aab

Quote
The traditional fitness-fatigue model starts with the observation that performance tends to reduce immediately after a workout, and stays reduced for up a few days in some cases. Yet, after the initial reduction, there is a rebound, and performance then improves.

The fitness-fatigue model explains this curve by proposing that it is the sum of two curves, one representing the fatigue effect, and the other representing the fitness improvement. Only once the fatigue effect has dissipated is it possible to see the fitness effect, even though fitness has actually been improving from immediately after the end of the workout.

Without the fitness-fatigue model, we could easily fall into the trap of believing that the fitness adaptations to a workout only occur after a couple of days, because of the reduction in performance. In fact, adaptations probably occur very soon after the workout itself.

Quote
What is “fitness” in an updated model?

The traditional fitness-fatigue model does not take into account newer research showing that strength can be positively affected by transient changes in the ability to produce force, as well as by long-lasting adaptations.

Long-lasting changes in strength involve adaptations inside the central nervous system or muscle-tendon unit, such as increases in voluntary activation, or increases in muscle size.

Transient improvements in the ability to produce force occur because of potentiation, which may also involve changes in either the central nervous system or inside the muscle.

Potentiation has most often been observed to occur immediately after a strength training workout, where it is referred to as the “post-activation potentiation” effect. Even so, potentiation can also be recorded several hours or even days after a workout. It is typically only seen when fatigue is minimal, such as after training with light loads and fast bar speeds.

Thus, in an updated fitness-fatigue model, we should refer to multiple fitness effects, some of which reflect long-lasting adaptations, and some of which reflect short-term potentiation.

In the traditional fitness-fatigue model, the temporary increase in fatigue that causes transitory reductions in performance was not well-defined, because of a lack of research in the area. Yet, the fatigue and recovery literature has developed substantially since the fitness-fatigue model was first suggested.

Research into recovery has shown that there are three factors that cause transient reductions in strength after a workout: (1) peripheral fatigue, (2) central fatigue, and (3) muscle damage.

Peripheral fatigue after a strength training workout is largely caused by the accumulation of metabolites, and its effects are dissipated within hours. Similarly, central fatigue is extremely transitory, and is rarely seen beyond an hour after a strength training workout (except when it occurs subsequent to severe muscle damage).

Muscle damage can produce reductions in strength that last for up to weeks in some cases, where the damage to the muscle is severe. More commonly, however, the reductions in strength because of muscle damage last only a couple of days.

Thus, in an updated fitness-fatigue model, we should refer to multiple fatigue effects. Also, we should be clear that peripheral and central fatigue usually reflect effects lasting only a few hours, while muscle damage reflects a longer-lasting effect, and is likely the primary determinant of losses in strength on the day or days after a hard workout.







I looked up tapering and came across a lot explanations and graph and it is an amazing concept but hard to get right just before the meet/competition especially amount of tapering for i.e. Olympic trials compared to actual Olympic games. This is where I have been going wrong, I just work and work and work, with a day or two rest between each week. that's why fatigue has been building up and even though the fitness has been going up and feel strong for each session, the performance during testing is not high it's actually low, but recovering from fatigue while maintaining routine to get stronger.

They mentioned the concept of overshooting phenomenon, a result of tapering in power demanding sports. But it's hard to implement in shorter sprints then it is with long distance running.

But great information, thanks.
Warm up drills
   - a walk, b skip quick powerful switch (heel to hams focus), a runs, dribbles small to big to run, straight leg to runs (force, reflex, go up/forward). force to hit the ground before it hits the ground knee/hip is at 90 degrees.
   - acceleration: low heel recovery, shin angle low, drive legs back before hitting the ground and drive thighs/knee forward not up
-------------------------------------------------------------
Measuring reminder:
5 toe to heel steps = 148cm
------------------------------------------------------------------------

�Strength comes from the legs, Power comes from the torso and Speed comes from the arm.� � Al Vermeil
Arm also aids the legs in driving it down with power - seifullaah73

My Progress Log
A Journey to Running fast and Jumping High
http://www.adarq.org/progress-journals-experimental-routines/my-journey-to-hypertrophy/

CoolColJ

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Re: Pre Testing Warm ups
« Reply #12 on: August 05, 2020, 08:00:20 am »
+1
That's why you want to maximize fatigue to stimulus ratio in your training sessions.
Deadlift max outs are probably the worst in this regard :)

seifullaah73

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Re: Pre Testing Warm ups
« Reply #13 on: August 05, 2020, 12:38:16 pm »
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That's why you want to maximize fatigue to stimulus ratio in your training sessions.
Deadlift max outs are probably the worst in this regard :)

Isn't the aim of maximizing stimulus to fatigue ratio if you want to achieve hypertrophy or can it also be for strength and explosiveness.

Would you do tapering after end of each phase instead at end of season. Such as end of GPP and then at end of strength training and at end of explosive training (SPP)  etc
Warm up drills
   - a walk, b skip quick powerful switch (heel to hams focus), a runs, dribbles small to big to run, straight leg to runs (force, reflex, go up/forward). force to hit the ground before it hits the ground knee/hip is at 90 degrees.
   - acceleration: low heel recovery, shin angle low, drive legs back before hitting the ground and drive thighs/knee forward not up
-------------------------------------------------------------
Measuring reminder:
5 toe to heel steps = 148cm
------------------------------------------------------------------------

�Strength comes from the legs, Power comes from the torso and Speed comes from the arm.� � Al Vermeil
Arm also aids the legs in driving it down with power - seifullaah73

My Progress Log
A Journey to Running fast and Jumping High
http://www.adarq.org/progress-journals-experimental-routines/my-journey-to-hypertrophy/

CoolColJ

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Re: Pre Testing Warm ups
« Reply #14 on: August 06, 2020, 12:29:01 am »
+1
That's why you want to maximize fatigue to stimulus ratio in your training sessions.
Deadlift max outs are probably the worst in this regard :)

Isn't the aim of maximizing stimulus to fatigue ratio if you want to achieve hypertrophy or can it also be for strength and explosiveness.

Would you do tapering after end of each phase instead at end of season. Such as end of GPP and then at end of strength training and at end of explosive training (SPP)  etc

both

You taper when you want to peak.
People deload every 4-6 weeks with power/strength work, to freshen up, since they usually do not recover between sessions.
If you have your training dialed right so you can recover fully month to month you do not need to deload

If you feel like crap, then you would deload